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Tue Mar 17, 2015, 09:03 PM

Recommendation for shade tree/shrub between two driveways?

I'm in Zone 7, and the space is about 11' x 12' and gets BLAZING sun (6+ hours a day). Minimum debris is a must.

Kousa Dogwoods are planted between nearby driveways, but don't get as much afternoon sun as next to my driveway.

The space is in front of a pink crape myrtle, a purple-ish barberry, and some sort of blue spreading juniper. I was thinking of a Naylor's Blue Leyland Cypress, but evidently they're hard to find in my area.

I have two Yoshino Japanese Cedars in my yard that are doing really well, but don't think they'd work because of winter winds. This driveway tree would be very exposed.

I've been all over the map researching -- European Hornbeam, Cleveland Select Pear, Little Gem Magnolia -- but can't seem to nail this down.

Any suggestions? Thanks!

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Reply Recommendation for shade tree/shrub between two driveways? (Original post)
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 OP
hollysmom Mar 2015 #1
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 #2
Major Nikon Mar 2015 #3
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 #4
Major Nikon Mar 2015 #5
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 #6
Botany Mar 2015 #7
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 #8
Botany Mar 2015 #9
WorseBeforeBetter Mar 2015 #10
roody Apr 2015 #11

Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Original post)

Tue Mar 17, 2015, 10:15 PM

1. No recommendation, but something to think about

first no nut tree - your car will be dinged
no berries as well
then no super sap tree, hard to get off.

does it need to be spreading to cool both trees or does it only have to shade one side?

I think I am in zone 7 or 6 and I have a 9 foot rhododendron and a 6 foot azalea if that helps

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Response to hollysmom (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 17, 2015, 10:42 PM

2. Thanks. I was under an oak...

what a colossal mess that was. The tree was damaged and cut down last October, and phew, the summer sun will be brutal. I've planted a (white) Natchez Crape in the front yard which should be gorgeous. Azalea Formosas are in my side yard under pines and doing really well. This driveway space would be too sunny for them. Same with rhodos.

I probably need to do symmetry just based on how the house and driveway are situated. I'm looking for at least -- I guess -- 15' of shade to be cast on my side. A purple-leaf plum would be gorgeous, but I'm guessing too messy and too wide.



I know the perfect tree/shrub is out there... just need to keep digging. No pun intended.

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Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Original post)

Wed Mar 18, 2015, 12:19 PM

3. Natchez Crape Myrtle

I have two of them. They will fit that space pretty well and they are fast growing and will provide good shade without getting too large. The only debris you will get from them is the falling flowers, which easily blow away in the wind. They do drop seeds, but they aren't really noticeable.

The bark is very attractive although you will probably have to treat for insect bark scale occassionally if that problem appears, but that's no big deal.

They produce white blooms for about 90 days in the summer. It's a good idea to prune several of the branches each year to keep them blooming aggressively and you can deadhead the old blooms if you want to make it bloom even more.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #3)

Thu Mar 19, 2015, 08:43 PM

4. Ha, I planted one of those early last October...

in the front yard. I'm sort of obsessed with it now, looking for growth, but it's still a bit early for crapes. I may plant a Tonto crape off to the other side in a small space. Or a Kousa Dogwood. The overall tree colors will be white, red, pink and maybe the purple-leaf plum next to the driveway (still need to research how messy it gets).

I'll be heading to the *swanky* nursery next week to see what they suggest.

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Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 19, 2015, 08:49 PM

5. I have one that's as tall as my house

The Natchez is actually a hybrid between the common crapes you see everywhere and the Japanese crapes which tend to be more tree like, but don't flower as flagrantly. Each year I prune out the inside branches and it flowers quite well.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #5)

Thu Mar 19, 2015, 09:03 PM

6. Thanks for the tips.

I have a three-story red brick house and am expecting this Natchez to get big and bushy and gorgeous. It has plenty of space and will get about 6 hours of sun.

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Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Original post)

Tue Mar 24, 2015, 09:02 PM

7. Plant a tree that is native to your area

Do not plant an ornamental pear tree. They are invasive and do little if anything for
our native "critters." Callery Pears have become a real pest in many parts of America.

If you PM me where you live and the size of tree you want I might be able to help you out.

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Response to Botany (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 27, 2015, 07:47 PM

8. Thanks, Botany...

I'm in Raleigh, NC. Based on the amount of shade that needs to be cast (and overall proportion), I'm guessing between 25 - 30'.

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Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Reply #8)

Fri Mar 27, 2015, 11:43 PM

9. You do not want a tree that will give you "quick shade" .....

.... because those tend to be quick growing trees that will have weak wood and
so they tend to break up w/ winds.

A nice tree/large shrub would be blackhaw viburnum ..... great fall color and native too ....
some nurseries grow it as a single trunked tree.

The native magnolia aka cucumber tree might be another good choice. it is a strong
grower too.

Sourwood or a Black Gum might work for you too.

Spend the time and the money to get a good NATIVE tree and make sure that you
plant it right by digging a large hole and working in plenty of a quality planting mix.

BTW do not worry about the final height on the tree because your are not going to live
to 120.

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Response to Botany (Reply #9)

Sun Mar 29, 2015, 10:14 AM

10. Thanks for the suggestions. The Sourwood is gorgeous!

Not sure it would work in front of a hot pink crape myrtle (two big focal points), but I'll research it and the others. A neighbor has a magnolia in front of her house that's about 30' tall with good form, so I may go knocking on her door. She planted it strategically to block afternoon sun to her front door. I don't care about a little mess on my driveway, but I gotta watch out for the guy next door.

Yeah, 120... no. The tree will be the HOAs problem at that point.

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Response to WorseBeforeBetter (Original post)

Sun Apr 19, 2015, 11:24 PM

11. red tip photinia

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