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Sun May 24, 2015, 08:57 PM

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This message was self-deleted by its author (NRaleighLiberal) on Mon Jun 20, 2016, 12:59 AM. When the original post in a discussion thread is self-deleted, the entire discussion thread is automatically locked so new replies cannot be posted.

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Reply This message was self-deleted by its author (Original post)
NRaleighLiberal May 2015 OP
NJCher May 2015 #1
NRaleighLiberal May 2015 #2
Brainstormy May 2015 #3
NRaleighLiberal May 2015 #4
mopinko May 2015 #5

Response to NRaleighLiberal (Original post)

Sun May 24, 2015, 11:04 PM

1. I was amazed at the size of the flowers on some

Then I read your post. Who would ever think that a tomato flower could be that size?

They look so healthy. What was the ratio of compost to soil you put in the straw bale beds?




Cher

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Response to NJCher (Reply #1)

Sun May 24, 2015, 11:16 PM

2. Hi! Flower size is genetically specific by variety - older heirloom types and large fruited types

will throw the occasional large flower. It is surprising to see such large flowers on some of the dwarfs, but they do use heirlooms as breeding material in their creation, and some have remarkably large fruit (just wait and see!).

This is the remarkable part - the only soil or mix is the small amount that cling to the roots when the transplant is inserted, and a bit to "heel in" the plant after that....the bale itself, as it slowly composts internally, is what is proving the growing environment. In a way, you can think of it as "structured hydroponics" - wheat straw is mostly cellulose, and has the structure to hold the roots and absorb slightly water and nutrients to feed the plants...and as time goes on and the bale centers compost more and more, they can absorb more and more water (and dry out more slowly).

So you just put the bales through a 10-12 day prep, then create an opening in the bale and slip in the tomato plant (or eggplant or pepper plant etc).

Cool, hey!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Original post)

Mon May 25, 2015, 12:04 AM

3. plants look beautiful!

Wish I could see the actual straw bales in the pics. Interested in the weekly blog.

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Response to Brainstormy (Reply #3)

Mon May 25, 2015, 12:08 AM

4. if you look at my blog tab, there are lots of bales in previous pics.

Standard size bales, wheat straw, two plants per bale - though I've planted all sorts of other things in bales (as you will see in my blogs). Have fun looking and ask anything!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Original post)

Mon May 25, 2015, 09:25 AM

5. my friend, you have no idea how proud i am to sell seedlings from

your seed!!
this years plant sale went very well. starting to get some repeat customers, who were amazed by the flavor of the tomatoes they have grown.
and when i post a list of the plants i am selling, it blows people away.

this being a place where most gardens, the dwarfs sell very well.

and this year instead of telling people that i get my seeds from some guy i know on the interwebs, i get to wave your book at them!!

you have been an invaluable friend to my little farm.
and to me.
thank you from the bottom of my heart.

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