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Sun Jun 14, 2015, 10:26 PM

Jaw dropping list of apple varieties grown in Virginia estate in 1736

Found a marvelous site of Gardening History.
Contains a list of all plants grown by Virginian William Byrd II's in 1736.
and this is just the apple trees:

Golden russet
Summer pearmain
Winter pearmain
Fall harvest apple
Winter queening
Lader-goller
Juntin' apple
Golden pippin
Carpendich
Red streaks
Jungferen
Long-stem apple
Red apple
Kabapffel
Green apple
French rennets

Very informative site ....http://americangardenhistory.blogspot.com/

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Reply Jaw dropping list of apple varieties grown in Virginia estate in 1736 (Original post)
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2015 OP
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2015 #1
NCarolinawoman Jun 2015 #2
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2015 #3
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2015 #4
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2015 #5
mopinko Jun 2015 #7
applegrove Jun 2015 #6
bigmonkey Jun 2015 #8
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2015 #9

Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Sun Jun 14, 2015, 10:33 PM

1. I love botanical history. Of the apples on that list, I've eaten and really enjoyed

Golden Russet and Winter Pearmain. I suspect many others are no more. (the great rush to the perfect looking, corky/punky, god awful Red Delicious of today has left mayhem in its path...)

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #1)

Sun Jun 14, 2015, 11:11 PM

2. Red Delicious are only good for Christmas displays--might as well have wax apples.

Horrible to eat. MEALY and TASTELESS.

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Response to NCarolinawoman (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 14, 2015, 11:16 PM

3. but aren't they purty! I've not had a RD in decades. We in NC have a great apple expert

Lee Calhoun - probably knows more about southern apple varieties than anyone. I've yet to meet him - not sure if apples and tomatoes mix!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 14, 2015, 11:40 PM

4. ohh..does have a web site or books or ...?

Our winters are changing and I am tempted to try cool spring vegies, but would also love a decent apple.

We gotta start thinking of growing more foods locally.

I am getting too old to enjoy the kind of gardening I did when I had my 15 acre produce place, but I am encouraging a friend who is very gung ho and who freely shares her bounty.
We are eating organic fresh picked Silver Queen corn, several varieties of old timey tomatoes, lots of zucchini, green beans this week, thanks to her.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #4)

Sun Jun 14, 2015, 11:54 PM

5. this looks like a good story on him

http://wunc.org/post/preserving-old-time-southern-apples

The real current apple expert that I meet each year when speaking at Monticello is Tom Burford - he had lots of his trees at Albemarle Cider Works near Charlottesville.

You can also order great heirloom apples each fall from Tree Mendus fruits in Michigan

http://www.treemendus-fruit.com/

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #5)

Mon Jun 15, 2015, 12:31 AM

7. my friend who is an organic apple grower recommends

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #1)

Mon Jun 15, 2015, 12:29 AM

6. The russet was my mom's favorite apple. She had a tree on the farm

she grew up on.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Mon Jun 15, 2015, 11:29 PM

8. Question for a friend

Anybody know of the Burlington Pippin, a late-19th century favorite centered in Burlington VT? Or know where I could find out about it? My friend is interested in the history, and also if it has survived.

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Response to bigmonkey (Reply #8)

Tue Jun 16, 2015, 12:11 AM

9. I would Google at this point

and you might try searching the blog at the link in my post.....

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