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Wed Mar 30, 2016, 08:59 PM

Anyone use a "Wall-o-water" for tomatoes?

If so, what was your experience?

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Reply Anyone use a "Wall-o-water" for tomatoes? (Original post)
NutmegYankee Mar 2016 OP
kentauros Mar 2016 #1
NutmegYankee Mar 2016 #2
kentauros Mar 2016 #3
Elad Mar 2016 #4
NutmegYankee Mar 2016 #5

Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Wed Mar 30, 2016, 09:16 PM

1. I can't add to your thread with experience,

but have been wondering about that technique, too. I have something called "climbing spinach" that a certain type of bird (my father and I think they're grackles) seems to like eating it. As it grows taller, I need something that will protect it, yet still allow the light through, and not the birdies

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Response to kentauros (Reply #1)

Wed Mar 30, 2016, 09:25 PM

2. I'm not sure it would work for long in that application.

The concept is the water filled plastic collapses into a teepee shape when half full and makes a mini green house. Later, when the plant gets taller you straighten out the tubes by completely filling them. In theory, it accelerates the growth and season by up to 6 weeks.

http://greenhousefarming.net/2013/06/01/wall-o-water/

I picked up a few to try. I have black cherry, yellow pear, mortgage lifter, black krim, pink brandywine and brandyboy for this years crop.

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Response to NutmegYankee (Reply #2)

Wed Mar 30, 2016, 10:09 PM

3. Thanks for the link :)

I'll probably just dig up my plant and put it in a pot inside. I did that already with another plant of succulent leaves (sorry, don't know what it's called, but is apparently extremely tasty to grackles.)

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Wed Mar 30, 2016, 10:57 PM

4. Yes, and peppers.

Last edited Thu Mar 31, 2016, 12:05 AM - Edit history (2)

They work really well if you live somewhere cool and need to keep them warm early in the season. I start my tomatoes indoors in late February, and just moved them outside into the wall of water containers. I'll leave them in there until mid May, which is when temps are consistently above 40 degrees at night around here, and they'll be busting out of them by then. I have ripe tomatoes by July 4th, weeks before pretty much everyone else in my area.

They are a bit difficult to manage, and cells leak, compromising the structure, but you can get repair sleeves. For me, the effort involved in filling them and moving them around is worth it.

They work better than a traditional greenhouse for keeping plants warm at night because the water absorbs heat during the day and releases it slowly at night. Basically, tomatoes need to be above 40 degrees at night to avoid shock. So if your nights are still getting close to that, these will help, but they are difficult to handle. It's a trade off that you choose, for earlier tomatoes - but you have to start your tomatoes earlier too - starting them at the same time and putting them in these won't help much, if at all.

I don't buy the red ones. I like the transparent green ones. The opaque green ones don't let as much light through.

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Response to Elad (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 31, 2016, 10:19 PM

5. Thanks for the info!

I live up in Connecticut and would like to get a jump start on my tomatoes.

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