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Sun Sep 8, 2019, 12:58 PM

Owning a dog means playing God - a pet owner's story.

Owning a dog means playing God. It's a role no human wants to play:
Neil Macdonald

CBC News

Link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/lola-charley-1.5273073

(snip)
Oh, one other thing people who don't own dogs don't have to do: assume the role of God. Sooner or later, like Jack the Beagle did, the dog will grow quiet, and start spending hours far back in a closet.

So you take the little fellow to the vet, hoping maybe it was something he'd eaten, or slurped up in a mud puddle, but really you know what's probably happening. And the vet will poke a bit, and look at his gums, and say well, he's getting older, maybe after a few tests we'll know better.
+++
I know, First World problems. And I know we anthropomorphize our pets. But anyone who speaks dog will understand.

I swear Lola gazes at us with utter trust. She has no idea what's coming. For now, I take her to the beach every day, and she takes long swims in the warm September river water and glories in fighting Charley for sticks, but she yips in pain sometimes.

I saw a bumper sticker once that stayed with me: "God help me become the person my dog thinks I am."

I don't have the heart for this. Meaning, of course, that I'm the failure.

I ran across this while reviewing the storm damage in Canada and thought I would share.

Don't currently have a dog but from past experience, I can relate.........

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Reply Owning a dog means playing God - a pet owner's story. (Original post)
KY_EnviroGuy Sep 8 OP
Big Blue Marble Sep 8 #1
KY_EnviroGuy Sep 8 #5
hlthe2b Sep 8 #2
lapfog_1 Sep 8 #3
KY_EnviroGuy Sep 8 #4
Bayard Sep 8 #6
AnnieBW Sep 8 #7

Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Original post)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 01:20 PM

1. Years ago,

I had a beloved dog who was diagnosed with deadly tumor which could rupture at any time,
yet she was free of pain and fully enjoying her life. The vet explained that she could
live comfortably for many more months, but her death would be horrific.

His words still resonate: "Your animal companions give you deep love all their lives. In return, you
have the ability to give them the gift of a comfortable death."

After several days of anguish, I chose to say goodbye my precious dog while she was feeling well,
rather to risk her suffering.

His wise words have guided me during multiple end-stage crises with other animals.
It is always hard to accept the responsibility, especially the timing, and yet is something
we can give our animals we cannot give our human loved ones during their exit.
And for this, I am grateful.

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Response to Big Blue Marble (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 01:41 PM

5. Thanks for your story. I had two die at home.

I tend to get very attached to the dogs I've had and have not been able to get another since I lost the last one. Maybe someday.

I think both had tumors, a Spitz and a Pit Bull. Neither showed signs of suffering but both became lethargic for a time before death.

As with you, I am very grateful for the time we had...

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Original post)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 01:21 PM

2. One day out of their (hopefully long life) you face nearly unimaginable sadness...

but every day before that day rewards you infinite times over.

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Original post)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 01:24 PM

3. It's not just dogs

my dad had a favorite horse... this horse had personality... at feeding time he would heard the other horses into a holding pen and close the gate on them so he could be the only horse to greet my dad with the bucket of grain. He would jump the fence and come up the house and stand politely at the front door for my dad to take him for a morning ride. You put an adult on his back (not my dad) and he was a handful... put a little kid on his back and he would do everything he could to make sure the kid didn't fall off.

When he got to the age of 18 or 20 (we didn't really know how old he was)... he would lay down and not get up... for long periods of time... he was in pain and it showed in his eyes... and my dad went one morning out to the pasture where his horse was laying there not moving... held his head cradled in his lap for a few minutes... and then stood up and shot him through his brain (we couldn't afford a vet to come put him to sleep). I never saw my dad cry until that morning... but he cried the entire time. AFAIK, my dad never rode another horse (even though we had a horse ranch).

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Response to lapfog_1 (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 01:31 PM

4. Beautiful story, thanks. That's the country way.

And your horse didn't suffer any more......

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Original post)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 03:33 PM

6. Every time I think my heart can't break any more,

It does. Just because I have a lot of animals on our little farm, doesn't mean it gets any easier.

What I've never been able to figure out is how many I've lost to some weird cancer.....

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Original post)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 09:46 PM

7. Owning a cat

Means worshiping them as a God!

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