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Fri Jan 6, 2012, 12:17 PM

Please, please, please do not breed or buy while shelter pets die.

I dropped off food and blankets at my county shelter this morning and it was overflowing with dogs and cats. It is a kill shelter and many beautiful animals won't be there when I stop next week.

My town will only license 3 dogs to a household or I would have filled my car with them. I called Yorkie rescue about two little frightened recent arrivals and they will be picked up tomorrow.

I encourage you to remember the pets in your local shelter. This time of year they need your old clean towels, blankets and sheets as well as treats. You can call ahead and see what they need the most. My shelter needed clean newspapers last year and one of my friends made arrangements to pick up the recycle from the nearby schools.

If you can make the walk through, check if you see any pure breeds or mixes that look like one breed or another. Take down their information and get in touch with their breed rescue. If they have a good organization they may have someone in the area that will pick up the dogs and get them to foster.

It's important that people who love animals get involved even in a small way.



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Reply Please, please, please do not breed or buy while shelter pets die. (Original post)
Walk away Jan 2012 OP
phylny Jan 2012 #1
CountAllVotes Jan 2012 #2
Warpy Jan 2012 #3
CountAllVotes Jan 2012 #4
badgerpup Jan 2012 #33
CountAllVotes Jan 2012 #35
roody Jan 2012 #5
ceile Jan 2012 #6
Walk away Jan 2012 #7
Curmudgeoness Jan 2012 #13
roody Jan 2012 #16
joeybee12 Jan 2012 #31
hamsterjill Jan 2012 #36
japple Jan 2012 #12
Coyote_Bandit Jan 2012 #8
roody Jan 2012 #17
Coyote_Bandit Jan 2012 #20
Mac1949 Jan 2012 #9
wildeyed Jan 2012 #10
avebury Jan 2012 #11
RavensChick Jan 2012 #14
astonamous Jan 2012 #15
TorchTheWitch Jan 2012 #18
avebury Jan 2012 #19
TorchTheWitch Jan 2012 #26
Coyote_Bandit Jan 2012 #24
michaz Jan 2012 #25
99Forever Jan 2012 #21
Stinky The Clown Jan 2012 #27
madinmaryland Jan 2012 #22
Stinky The Clown Jan 2012 #23
onestepforward Jan 2012 #28
Joe Shlabotnik Jan 2012 #29
badgerpup Jan 2012 #34
PotatoChip Jan 2012 #30
avebury Jan 2012 #32

Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 12:21 PM

1. Thanks for this plea.

On my bed, about a foot from me, is our shelter boy Jack. He would have told you himself how important it is to adopt a shelter dog, but he's deep in fluffy covers, on his back, blissfully snoring.

Jack has been with us almost two years. We can't imagine life without him.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 01:12 PM

2. both of my cats are rescues

They are lovely cats and I love them both.

One (who is now almost 11 years old) is from a no-kill shelter (that I donate money to) and the other one was at the local shelter where they kill them.

Said kitten from the shelter is now a 5 year old cat and she is perfect in every way; never makes any mistakes or gives you cause to correct her. She was so happy that I adopted her. To this day, she still sleeps on the little Boogie Mat I got her as a little 2 lb. kitten filled with worms. She remembers; all of it.

When I got her, she was very sick. Had I not adopted her that day, they would have figured out that she was very sick and they'd have put her down and she would not exist today.

People that buy animals ... ugh ... won't comment further because I know where this is going in my mind from puppy mills to greedy breeders that enjoy inbreeding.

You are very right, people need to get involved and stop buying animals just because they want a particular type. I'll keep my two cats (one is likely a purebred and the one one is your classic American Shorthair with very short legs to go with the short hair!).






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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 01:12 PM

3. This is important and really needs to be repeated often.

Adopting rescues from a shelter not only gives an existing animal a needed home, it also supplies the new owner with an animal who is damned grateful for the chance.

My last cats have been rescues, adopted as adults from shelters. Yes, even my crotchety old tomcat had the sense to be grateful to be rescued from Kitty Auschwitz. The odd part is that he'd been an expensive designer cat, neglected for the first four years of his life by people who didn't know how to care for him properly.

People who are looking for dogs to adopt can also find mutts at the shelter. The advantage to the generic mutt is that they're generally healthier and a bit smarter than designer dogs. They certainly lack the physical problems that overbreeding has caused a lot of dogs out there.

If you insist on a designer breed, there are organizations out there dedicated to the rescue of specific breeds. A quick Google of the breed name + rescue will turn them up.

It's impossible to overstate the rewards people get from adopting shelter animals, rewards that don't exist when animals are purchased from breeders, going from one good home to another. Cats and dogs who have experienced the cold, cruel world really do have a better appreciation for the homes we give them.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 01:44 PM

4. I couldn't agree more Warpy!

>> Cats and dogs who have experienced the cold, cruel world really do have a better appreciation for the homes we give them.

Never has a truer statement been made, never!

Adopt don't buy an animal that is purebred nightmare! Genetic defects are indeed rampant as you state due to inbreeding, etc.



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Response to CountAllVotes (Reply #4)

Mon Jan 9, 2012, 10:32 PM

33. One of my Caturday friends...

...was given a kitten from a bad breeder (she didn't buy him; he was a gift from somebody who didn't know better).
This kitten has all sorts of health issues and will never be a normal cat...and he is a dear sweet cuddly loving boy who is going to break both his human and his feline 'brother's' heart by dying young.

The animals the breeders produce are real, unfortunately...and even if they get a good 'forever home', they don't have a fair shake and tend to prejudice their owners about getting ANY other animal after they're gone. Who wants heartbreak?

We know that heartbreak is part of the contract...but one expects to have a bit of time with the furkid, not immediate right-off-the-bat.



I hope I'm making sense...I DO NOT condone breeders and am all for adopting shelter animals (two of mine are rescues; the other two adopted ME).

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Response to badgerpup (Reply #33)

Tue Jan 10, 2012, 11:59 AM

35. several years ago I adopted a dog

Said dog was a Sheltie that no one wanted. She had a myriad of health problems from the get-go. I had her for about 6 mos. and found her in the backyard in a pit she had dug next to the grave of my other old Sheltie that had died.

That told me where I stood with the dog. It was a sad day when that happened and I've never owned another dog since.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 01:57 PM

5. Spay and neuter is the solution!

Please never pass up the chance to encourage people to spay and neuter their pets. Give to spay/neuter charities. I walk shelter dogs and help them get adopted. It is the most fun thing I have ever done. Our county shelter only euthanizes those deemed unadoptable. But we have an incredible corps of volunteers who help them become adoptable.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 02:13 PM

6. Your title is flame bait.

The rest of the thread I agree with, but your title is inflamatory.

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Response to ceile (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 02:44 PM

7. It's amazing to me that anyone would think that advocating adoption...

and politely asking people not to breed or buy is flame bait. Why do you thing these shelters are overflowing in the first place?

If you like to breed animals then go ahead. I cannot stop you but I am actually floored that you would accuse me of trying to start an argument. I would be much happier to hear only from people who agree with me whole heartedly. It would restore my faith in this board. There seems to be quite a few home breeders here.

Apparently, there is no place in DU where it is acceptable to stand up for the millions of shelter animals put to death in this country while people choose to buy and back yard breed. I get it.



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Response to Walk away (Reply #7)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 09:48 PM

13. I love your title.

And I wholeheartedly agree.

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Response to Walk away (Reply #7)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 02:22 AM

16. This IS the place to advocate for the animals.

Thank you for doing so.

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Response to Walk away (Reply #7)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 07:53 PM

31. I agree with you...

 

No one should be buying pets especially since they're most likely getting them from puppy mills.

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Response to Walk away (Reply #7)

Tue Jan 10, 2012, 01:25 PM

36. Your title is perfectly fine.

I stand WITH you for the millions of shelter animals put to death in this country, many, many of them in the city where I live.

I find it appalling that people are willing to contribute to the numbers for monetary gain! When the problem to begin with is that there are too many animals, the solution is certainly NOT to bring more into the situation.

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Response to ceile (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 09:22 PM

12. It's not a bit inflammatory, esp. to one who has worked to save and rescue animals from high-kill

animal shelters. The shelter where I volunteer puts down about 50% of the animals that come in. In the last year alone, thousands of animals have died because of pet over-population. Most of it is due to lack of spaying & neutering, but backyard breeders are a huge problem, often dumping unsold litters in the shelter and expecting taxpayers to deal with their negligence.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 03:32 PM

8. Every animal I have ever had was in immediate need of a home

None of them came from a traditional rescue organization.

None ever will.

There are many other places to obtain such an animal. Some considerably less glamorous and all considerably less recognized as a source to find an animal in need of a home. Sometimes they come at no cost - or lower cost than that of a rescue organization. Sometimes the animal comes with a medical history. Sometimes they come with shots, spay/neuter and basic training. Usually you don't have to deal with 20+ page applications to adopt that require a recommendation from your first grade teacher (ok maybe not but many groups do have a highly intrusive application process). Usually you do not have to contract to surrender the animal back to the rescue group should it become necessary to re-home the animal. Sorry, but if I have had the animal for any length of time then I am the one most suited to make that decision because I am the one who best knows the animals' experiences, needs, preferences and acquaintances.

I have known several vets that rescue animals from shelters and rescue groups - not to mention the animals that are dumped in their clinics or left tied to their door. It is not uncommon for shelters and some rescue groups to euthanize animals for treatable medical conditions - even for such minor things as ringworm. The vets I have known who did that often placed the animals through their own practice without any cost whatsoever. My own vet does that and only asks for voluntary conributions. In the past I have contributed money and towels and labor and ...... to her efforts. I'll continue to do so.

Thanks for the reminder.





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Response to Coyote_Bandit (Reply #8)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 02:25 AM

17. There is nothing glamourous about the county

shelter where I volunteer. Seeing the dogs and cats get adopted is very satisfying. Knowing who got euthanized is heartbreaking.

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Response to roody (Reply #17)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 11:12 AM

20. The majority of people know

the shelter is there and that they can get an animal there. Usually fairly low cost without a particularly intrusive adoption process. Shelters perform a valuable and necessary service.

Some rescue groups have budgets large enough to permit them to do significant advertising. Some have fairly significant adoption fees and a lengthy and sometimes intrusive adoption process.

Meanwhile I can take you to several vet offices that do medical rescue where the only budget is volunatary contributions and the only advertising is a small bulletin board in the lobby identifying animals in need of a home - usuallly without mention of the in-house rescue efforts. If you want to get an animal from a vet rescue like this then you generally have to seek out the opportunity. Often their own clientelle are unaware of their rescue efforts.

Advertising, budgets, awareness. Given the fact that there are far more animals in need of a home than people willing to take them in, that's glamorous.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 05:41 PM

9. Over the last 10 years we have had 7 cats (of which we still have 5).

Each was a feral or stray we brought inside, and each was among the most clever and most loving animals I've ever known. Adoption is the way to go.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 06:26 PM

10. All my animals are rescues.

I have had a couple of really nice pure breeds as well as some wonderful mutts. I usually adopt adult dogs. The benefit of this is they are usually house trained and I get to see their real, adult temperament and energy level and can make a better decision about how the dog will fit into our lifestyle.

I posted a picture in this forum of my newest guy Ziggy recently. The trainer who works with us said that she had seen dogs that people paid 2k+ for that were not as nice as my rescue dog. He was skinny and neglected looking at first, but he is filling out nicely, is super smart and great with my kids and other animals. Could not ask for a nicer dog.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 08:20 PM

11. Totally Agree! nt

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Fri Jan 6, 2012, 11:32 PM

14. Well said!

I didn't get my cat from a shelter but this thread is encouraging me to help out the local shelter near me. I've had my little one for almost 2 years and he's sweet as he can be. My neighbor's cat had 3 kittens and he turned out to be the runt, so it was meant for me to take him in. I've been taking good care of him and so far so good. I wish everyone can be considerate enough to remember all the animals in shelters who would otherwise be put down if they even appear to be sick or aggressive.

Thanks for posting!

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 01:06 AM

15. Elsie says:

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 05:55 AM

18. A shelter pet isn't for everyone

Sorry, but I already went through getting a dog with unknown genetic history, and though his behavior was impeccable (aside from his separation anxiety) his physical health was a disaster. Though I got him through a decent lifespan, it cost a fortune I couldn't afford and why I'm STILL in financial dire straights all these years later, and there was a lot he couldn't do. He likely spent most of his life in some stage of misery. Never again. When I get a pet I need him to have good odds at a healthy and long life, and I don't want any other kind of dog but an Akita since I'm completely hooked on the breed.

After the first one I will only get my dogs through a respectable breeder that I can be certain the dogs are breed for health and temperment to greatly lessen the odds of physical or behavioral problems, that they will be raised and cared for correctly in those very important weeks before they are old enough to go to their forever home, and that cares just as much about the sort of person they sell their pups to as I care about the sort of person breeding them.

My dog is my best friend, my family abd my protector. I won't apologize for being even more discerning about what kind of dog I choose than what mate... after all, I can always unload a mate that becomes too much to bear but not my dog.

I already spent nearly 12 years of martyrdom with a pet, and though I loved him so much I wouldn't have traded him for the world once I had him, I'll NEVER run such a high risk with another pet again. I did my time, went broke and was almost perpetually heartbroken because of all of his problems. Been there, done that, NEVER EVER again.


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Response to TorchTheWitch (Reply #18)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 08:07 AM

19. Then I hope that you thoroughly research any breeder that you

aquire your pets from. I have heard too many horror stories of people who thought that they were getting pets from healthy lineages only to find themselves in financial quagmires because the breeders were in it only for the money not the good of the breed. People cannot assume that all breeders will sell healthy puppies. When I was growing up, we had two breeder produced dogs, one of which had health problems and ended up being put to sleep at the age of 3. I have only gotten rescue animals and have never had any health problems with them besides the normal issues they incur due to old age.

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Response to avebury (Reply #19)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 12:14 AM

26. Of course, that goes without saying

I did a ton of research on which Akita breeders were good enough for me. In the entire world I discovered that there's really only about five of them. Luckily for me, two of them were in my state though neither at a reasonable distance and they co-own a lot of their dogs. It's no easy thing to get a pup from the most respected breeders since they generally don't sell to companion only homes, their waiting lists are LOOOOOOOONG, and the breedings are few and far between. With the last two dogs (the one I have now I just got in September) I just got extremely lucky, and with both a lot of that luck had to do with being somewhat known personally to the breeders as well as the timing during the year.

Still, I almost didn't get so lucky with the current pup. He wasn't from the litter of pups I was hoping on. He was supposed to be the breeder's own dog, but unforseen circumstances made him decide that he just couldn't devote the necessary time and attention to him and had to make the very hard decision to give him up as a companion dog to someone (me!). Had it not been for the unforseen circumstances he would have kept the dog, and it isn't likely that I was high enough of the list to get one of the pups from the new litter. So, again with this dog, I just happened to get very lucky in not having to have to wait a long time even though I started my search months before the current dog had even passed away. But because he was already four months old when I got him, I did miss out on a bit of his puppyhood. I'm ok with that though. There were some plusses in getting an older pup, like he was already potty trained and had been socialized well with people and a lot of other dogs, and knew how to ride in a car.

Even going through the best and most respected breeder there is is no guarantee. But it does very much better the odds of getting a pup that is likely to be healthy and live a decent lifespan, and some problems actually can be guaranteed against (like hip displasia). I don't expect perfection since it can't be guaranteed, but I do really like being able to greatly better the odds by going through a well respected and responsible breeder.

Of course, by going through a well respected and responsible breeder it also means that you may have to wait a very long time, and may not be able to choose the pup that you want. Again, I just got lucky that I was able to get the gender that I wanted though I did tell the breeder that I'd be ok with either gender (I just think I always stick to males since every dog in my life has been male and just what I'm most accustomed to).

Another thing I really like about a responsible and well respected breeder is that in the event that you can't keep the dog they will take it back to re-home. Since I'm one of those people that doesn't have anyone else that I know would take my dog and give him the love and attention I expect I worry what would happen to them should I drop dead unexpectedly. I feel a lot better that should I get hit by a bus tomorrow or some other unforseen thing causes my death or inability to keep the dog that the breeder will take him back and either keep him themselves or find another good home for him.

I also really like it that they contract that their pups MUST be spayed/neutered and reserve the right to take the pup back if you don't. Since show dogs must be intact, they contract for those show people that the dogs can't be bred and can take them back if they are. Responsible breeders don't want any of the pups they produce to be used for any indiscriminant breeding or breeding at all. Since they work so hard at improving the breed through their line they don't want all that work and attention screwed up by breedings they don't approve of or can't have control over. Since I recently had my pup neutered I shot off an email with a copy of the paperwork proving he had it done to the breeder, and was happy to do it.

By the way, my first Akita WAS breeder produced, but as I learned much later by a backyard breeder that bred dogs they shouldn't have because of health issues in their history, and gave them up at far too young an age to a puppy mill. I didn't know about stuff like that then, but I sure learned the hard way throughout his life. Technically he was a purebred with a pedigree, but after finally acquiring his full four generation pedigree that the breeder had tried to hide it was discovered that there were several instances of inbreeding too close to his generation and too close in relationship. Now I know that no respectable breeder would ever breed their dogs indiscriminantly, hide the four generation pedigree nor sell pups to a puppy mill nor at too young an age. To this day I'm still angry at that terrible breeder and would love to give them a piece of my mind. Since then, I've done years of hard research, so now I know what breeders are worth it and which ones are iffy and which ones are horrible. It took a lot of hard work, but it was definitely worth it. I'll not be fooled again.


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Response to TorchTheWitch (Reply #18)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 01:52 PM

24. While I have always taken in animals in immediate need of a home

I have also started training them to show, to do competition obedience, to do agility work and to do therapy work.

It is one thing to take in a rescue animal as a companion and family pet. It is quite another to take in a rescue animal with uncertain genetics, breeding and experiences and invest that kind of time, effort and expense into training.

I have had dogs with uncertain pasts. I am well acquainted with the problems of caring for dogs with serious lifelong health problems and with multiple genetic and behavioral issues. It is expensive, its takes an emotional toll and it does impact other animals that share the same household. It certainly isn't for everyone - and no one should be made to feel obligated to take on such a challenge.

There are good breeders. You have to seek them out and know how to identify them. And if you want one of their animals then you need to be prepared to pay a premium.

If you want an animal companion and family pet and are willing and able to assume the costs and responsibility of caring for an animal with lifelong health and behavioral issues than by all means get a rescue or shelter dog. I'll applaud you for doing so - as long as you don't proselytize me to do the same and infer that I am somehow inferior should I make a different choice.

If you are not willing and able to assume that responsibility, then find a responsible breeder and negotiate contract terms that include health guarantees. Many responsible breeders guarantee that their animals will not have or develop certain health problems during their lifetime and will assume financial responsibility should those occur.

I adopted a dog from a traditional rescue organization once. Less than 24 hours after taking possession of the dog I had him examined by my vet because it appeared to me that his health was not as represented. My vet advised that the dog likely was considerably older than represented, had severe heart problems and likely would not survive for a year. The dog's physical condition was either intentionally misrepresented to me or the rescue organization was unaware of his condition. Either way, the dog did not meet my requirements and expectations and I immediately surrendered him back to that rescue group.

I have not taken in an animal since then without first having my own veterianarian examine the animal and do a variety of tests. It is well worth the expense.

I'm not lookng for a dog at the moment. If I were looking for a dog that I expected to invest considerable time and effort and expense in training I would likely look for a dog through a responsible breeder. And I would make the placement conditional on the results of a physical exam by my vet.

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Response to TorchTheWitch (Reply #18)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 08:56 PM

25. The only dog we ever bought was a 3 month old Weimaraner.

Believe me we researched and researched and thought we had the best of breeders. Not. She had some problems and we spent a good deal of money getting her righted around. We lost her last year at the age of 11. We loved her dearly. Since then we have rescued 4 dogs from high kill shelters in the south (we live in upstate NY). We have a purebred Weimaraner, her puppy which is a Weim/Chocolate Lab mix, a Black Lab mix and a Border Collie mix. 2 came from GA and the Weim and her puppy from Mississippi. We also have another Weim that we have had for 9 years now (he came from rescue in Michigan). They are all wonderful dogs and extremely appreciative of all they now have. They are so loving and loyal. We will never purchase another dog again. Our neighbor bought 2 Black Labs from a "wonderful breeder" because he wanted them to hunt with and some day to breed. Both dogs ended up with degenerative hips. What a waste of money he now says. There is no guarantee with any animal, whether purchased from the best breeder or gotten at a shelter or rescue group. But I will take my chances with the animal that needs a home and am thrilled to save it's life.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 12:04 PM

21. Oh my.

Last edited Sat Jan 7, 2012, 12:39 PM - Edit history (1)

I'm almost hesitant to pitch in my nickles worth. What the heck, eh?

I'm less than inclined to simplistic black and white thinking on any subject and this is no exception. We've both fostered and adopted dozens of rescue dogs over the past 4 decades, and are huge proponents of doing so for those people who have the resources and the inclination. However, in the real world, right or wrong, some folks are looking for specific traits in a pet. I have heard convincing arguments made from all sides of this issue. In the end, I think taking a "morally superior" stance for any of them, is counter-productive and does little to advance a viewpoint.

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Response to 99Forever (Reply #21)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 12:41 AM

27. "What the heck, eh?"

I agree completely with your comments.

Well said.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 12:26 PM

22. Of our last six cats (over 15 years), three have been from shelters,

one has been from a woman who rescues pregnant cats (ours was one of the litter), and two have been adopted from others (one being DUer, Flaxbee!).

With three cats now, we just don't have anymore room. They need their space too!

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2012, 12:37 PM

23. We've never bred or bought an animal, ever.

And we've had more than a few of them.

Well, there *was* Harry, SparklyJr's goldfish. He was bred. Then he went belly up. I raced over to the Petco to buy a replacement before she noticed. The ersatz Harry was placed in the bowl. He looked identical to recently departed alter ego.

"Where's Harry?" asked SparklyJr, casually. "That's Harry, right there," said Sparkly. "Mooo-ooom, that's not Harry. Harry was floating upside down when I went to bed last night. I'll call this one Dirty Harry, okay?"

Anyway, I digress. Our first dog predates any of our children. 1972 was the first year. A barn little Beagle puppy we got when we lived in Durham, NC. Then Duchess, a rambunctious Lab who we got in Memphis right as StinkyJr2 was whelped . . . er . . . . born. The Lab was playful, but far too aggressive around the newborn. He was given away to a family we knew who had a lot of land about 20 miles east of where we lived in Bartlett.

And on and on. Every pet we've had has been from someone somewhere offering an unwanted or abandoned animal. Formal rescues, pound hounds, accidental/unwanted litters, etc. All we've ever paid for any one of them has been vet and rescue fees. For most of them, there wasn't even a rescue fee.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 04:10 AM

28. I've always gotten shelter pets

and they have been a true joy in my life

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 04:30 AM

29. 2 of my Shepherds came from the Toronto German Shepherd Rescue Society,

And they both turned out to be the sweetest and best dogs ever. 2 others I got were just barely still puppies, but unwanted by people I knew, they too became noble and wonderful members of our pack. I will promote this practice until the day I die. But be careful with adopting farm kittens/cats (ie if you live in a rural area), this practice worked well for me for many years, and I had 1/2 dozen adopted farm cats that became house cats. They all learned the rules of the house quickly and were wonderful, but....... the last 1 killed 2 of my others with feline lukemia, before he succumbed. so just be warned.

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Response to Joe Shlabotnik (Reply #29)

Mon Jan 9, 2012, 10:48 PM

34. Lost a kitty to feline leukemia...

...and that was one too many...especially this cat was on the shortlist to make World's 100 Coolest Cats.
Now when I adopt I have the vet check for fe-leuk and FIV before 'adopting' the little critter.
So far I've been lucky; everybody's come up negative and they all get the leukemia vaccine with their annual shots. Costs a bit more, but worth it.

I don't know what I'd do if I took a kitty in to get OK'd and it was positive for fe-leuk or FIV. Hope I'll never have to find out.

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2012, 12:12 PM

30. Though I am partial to German Shepherd dogs, I agree with you.

Our german shepherd is nearing his last days, so at this point, a new dog is not really on our radar.

However, if/when we are ready for another dog, he/she will definately come from our local animal shelter. Who knows, maybe I will find a nice GS mixed breed? But if not, that is ok too. What IS certain for me, is the fact that our shelter choice will NOT be a puppy. I have volunteered at our local animal shelter from time to time, and found that adult dogs and cats are much harder to place. Most people seem to want just puppies or kittens, sadly.

As you so rightly point out, there is a great need for more loving homes. The very idea of any healthy animal being put down for lack of a home, is a national disgrace- imho.

In the meantime, as a tribute to my dog Jimmy, I will be donating a modest sum of money, as well as his toys, food, treats and dog-beds. I have 3 very nice large-dog size beds that are machine washable... (they unzip-which keeps them from being too hard on the shelter washing machine).

Now, more then ever, we really need to be thinking of our furry friends in shelters. Times are hard everywhere and unfortunately shelter and animal control funds tend to be the first thing stripped from municipal budgets. Some municipalities provide very little or no monetary assistance at all anyway- hard economic times just make everything even worse.

Thanks for this very important reminder WA!

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Response to Walk away (Original post)

Mon Jan 9, 2012, 02:31 PM

32. I have a co-worker who recently took in her niece, great-niece, and three dogs.

One of the dogs is an in-tact (sp?) male pit who evidentally is afraid of his own shaddow. She talked about how sweet the dog is but he gets excitable when she comes home and jumps on her. We told her to ignore the dog until the dog calms down because all she is doing is encouraging bad behaviour.

We have mentioned to our co-worker that the pit should be neutered but apparently her niece is thinking about breeding him with a yet to found female. I have no problems with Pits because I recognize that the problem tends to be the owners and the way they raise/treat their dog(s). Unfortunately most people automatically thing they are evil and should be put down.

We immediately brought up:

1. If it is a fearful dog it could easily develop fear aggressive if they are not careful.
2. Neutering the dog might help to help keep some problems from developing.
3. Does her niece have any idea how many pits end up being put down all over the country because of the way people feel about them?
4. I stated that someone should take her niece and walk her through our local city animal shelter and she would see how many are sitting there at any one time. I know because I have been there many a time. Of course my co-worker cannot stand the thought of walking through the shelter. I stated that I would have no problem if it would get the point across to the niece.

If the niece does end up breeding this dog I doubt that any litter would be focused on improving the breed because it would not be any better then a backyard breeder situation and she would have to get a female pit if she did not find someone with one to breed with her dog.

The situation is not looking promising at this point.

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