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Sun Jun 16, 2019, 12:37 PM

What Fiction are you reading this week, June 16, 2019?


To all you dads out there, Happy Day!

Back on Mother’s Day I received Probable Claws, A Mrs. Murphy Mystery by the lovely Ms. Rita Mae Brown. I didn’t know she was such an activist. That, along with her opinionated 4-legged companions, and beautiful illustrations, are making this a very enjoyable read.

I’m also getting to know the characters in the harrowing tale of a world’s end, The Fifth Season. I can see why N. K. Jemisin keeps winning Hugo Awards for this series.

What books are you enjoying this week?

To all the rest of you out there, Happy Sunday!

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Reply What Fiction are you reading this week, June 16, 2019? (Original post)
hermetic Jun 16 OP
trev Jun 16 #1
hermetic Jun 16 #2
murielm99 Jun 16 #3
hermetic Jun 16 #4
PoindexterOglethorpe Jun 20 #15
hermetic Jun 16 #5
yellowdogintexas Jun 16 #10
trev Jun 16 #7
yellowdogintexas Jun 16 #11
trev Jun 16 #14
FakeNoose Jun 16 #6
hermetic Jun 16 #9
highmindedhavi Jun 16 #8
yellowdogintexas Jun 16 #12
hermetic Jun 16 #13
PoindexterOglethorpe Jun 20 #16
spin Jun 23 #17
elfin Jun 23 #18
hermetic Jun 23 #19

Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 12:47 PM

1. Just finished "Black House" by Stephen King and Peter Straub.

The last two King books I've read continue the Dark Tower theme. Unfortunately, I haven't read that series. It's too bad I'm getting in on it at the end, but I have to say I like the tale. Writing with Straub really changes King's style, and I like that, too.

Today I'm starting his The Green Mile. I enjoyed the movie, thought I'd check out the book. (Literally; I'm getting my reading material from the library of late, which is why I'm limited in my choices. Otherwise, I'd definitely be reading the Tower right now.)

As a new author myself, I was thrilled to have Straub ask me to friend him on FB.

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Response to trev (Reply #1)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 12:55 PM

2. How nice!

Best of luck with your writing. Keep us apprised of your progress.

You live in a small town? I do so I know what you mean by limited choices. Yesterday though, I drove to our nearest "big" city and got a library card there. They have EVERYTHING. I am so thrilled that I will finally be able to read so many of the books I've learned about here but could never find.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 01:00 PM

3. You don't have interlibrary loan?

My small library can get most things for me that way.

Also, I am just finishing another Mary Russell book. Next, I will read William Kent Krueger's Heavens Keep.

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Response to murielm99 (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 01:06 PM

4. They charge you to use it

Books get sent thru the mail so they ask you to pay postage. This is the result of R government here for a long time and severe library funding cuts.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #4)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 12:21 PM

15. That's unfortunate.

I believe most libraries do not charge for interlibrary loan.

I get most of my books from the library because I can't afford to buy so many, and I have only so much space here for them. My local library in Santa Fe is quite good. I can also request that they purchase books, and about half or a bit more of my suggestions get bought. No charge for interlibrary loan, which I appreciate. Also no fines for overdue books. Plus, now with the miracle of the internet, I can put books on hold and renew them two times on my computer. Life is good.

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Response to murielm99 (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 01:13 PM

5. AND, Mr. Krueger

has written quite a few books and my new library looks like they have ALL of them. Woohoo!!

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Response to murielm99 (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 03:37 PM

10. check into the availability of E-books via the library

especially if you can get a card at a larger library.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 01:47 PM

7. I'd say my city is above average in size.

We actually have three library branches here, with the main one being downtown, an adjunct on the eastern edge, and a small room in the mall about a mile from my place. The main one is awesome: five stories tall, with banks of internet computers filling half the bottom floor. It's new, having been built just a few years ago. The land, materials and construction costs were all donated by locals. I love the place. I can sit in a comfortable chair on the 5th floor--which is surrounded by an observation deck--and look out through floor-to-ceiling windows over the river just half a mile away.

But even a good library can't carry everything, so with someone like King it's hard to find all his works. Plus half the floor space is set up for reading and studying.

Thanks for the good wishes. I've published one novel and a short story, and have just submitted another short story. I currently have three projects: I'm writing a sequel to the first book, finishing a Young Adult novel, and shopping around another completed novel. Selling is the hard part; writing is fun.

Enjoy your new privileges!

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Response to trev (Reply #7)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 03:41 PM

11. another thought: does your Library have a Friends of the Library organization?

the library here resells all the donated books at their book fairs twice a year. You can go on line and peruse the selection any time and order a book for pickup. I have picked up some real bargains this way..

King is so popular that you might also find a good selection at paperback trade in stores.

Your small branch charges for interlibrary loan between the three branches in your town?

Ours only charges if it is outside our library's service area

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Response to yellowdogintexas (Reply #11)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:26 PM

14. Yes, we have a Friends

I volunteered for a year with the Friends in the next city over. We had some great books there. The main branch here has a used bookshop on the premises, open every day. I haven't bought anything there yet, but I have learned of some new authors whose books I've checked out.

We don't have interlibrary loans. But the branches are so close I just go to them instead. I can check out a book anywhere, and return it anywhere. Very convenient.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 01:47 PM

6. I just finished The Girl from Berlin by Ronald H. Balson



It's an awesome story that would make a great movie IMHO. Despite the title most of it takes place in Italy, and the title character is indeed from Berlin originally. It's a story-within-a-story, and it jumps between present time to the years between the wars in Tuscany and Bologna. The two interwoven themes are riveting enough with a few surprises along the way. It's partly a love story from the pre-World War II times, and partly a modern legal thriller.

I couldn't put it down, and after I finished it I gave it to my sister and niece who also enjoy such novels. As a rule I don't often read fiction, but this book was quite enjoyable.


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Response to FakeNoose (Reply #6)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 03:11 PM

9. That sounds really good

Thanks for telling us about it.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 03:03 PM

8. Re-reading Wind in the Willows

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 03:57 PM

12. The Lost Road to Key West by Michael Reisig

Latest in a 10 book series in which the main characters (Kansas and Will) live in Key West. They have boats, and a plane and are divers - they are equipped to handle a variety of tourist needs. They also have an assortment of outrageous friends, with whom they hunt for treasure, run into all sorts of dangerous trouble, and get themselves out of jams in some very original ways.

The group of friends was nicknamed "The Hole in the Coral Wall Gang" back around book 8.

I recommend these books be read in order for better continuity. They are a fun read - great for the beach. One might think this is a 'guy's" series, but this woman loves adventure escapades. My first adventure read was H. Rider Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines" and "She". I have been hooked ever since.

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Response to yellowdogintexas (Reply #12)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 04:14 PM

13. Hi! Good to see you again

Those do sound fun. There is something about Key West that I find most compelling. I have lived on larger islands and by the ocean but that place just seems so unique. So this woman is all for reading about adventures and treasure hunts and shenanigans going on down there, too.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 12:29 PM

16. Skin Deep by Liz Nugent.

It's her third novel.

She writes the best opening lines ever:
"I wondered when rigor mortis would set in, or if it already had.'

Opening line of her first novel, Unraveling Oliver: "I expected more of a reaction the first time I hit her."

Second novel, Lying in Wait: "My husband did not mean to kill Annie Doyle, but the lying tramp deserved it."

Really, really good stuff.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 23, 2019, 03:26 AM

17. Dracula by Bram Stoker. ...

The novel “The Night Crossing” by Robert Masello sparked my interest in this old classic as Bram Stoker was one of the lead characters.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Jun 23, 2019, 11:42 AM

18. Nobody's Fool by Richard Russo

Fantastic! It has very little plot and yet is a page-turner with many laugh-out-loud passages along with profound observations by its flawed characters in a small town.

Immediately after finishing it, downloaded "Everybody's Fool" in the same small town a decade later.

I usually read only mysteries and now it is a mystery to me why I never found this award-winning author before now.

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Response to elfin (Reply #18)

Sun Jun 23, 2019, 12:12 PM

19. Aren't they wonderful?

Russo is a terrific writer.

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