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Thu May 19, 2011, 09:20 PM

Does anyone feel that learning about true crime has helped you protect yourself?

From, you know, criminals? I do. Just recently, reading the book, "When a Fan Hits the Shit: The Rise and Fall of a Phony Charity," has helped me learn about which non-profits I want to give money to and which I don't. I'm relieved to have been pointed in the right direction there.

I know there's always the risk that learning more about crime and criminal activity will make us more paranoid about this aspect of our society, and may not be a good thing for us emotionally. Still, I've found that learning about true crimes has been empowering.

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Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply Does anyone feel that learning about true crime has helped you protect yourself? (Original post)
BlueIris May 2011 OP
NJCher Dec 2011 #1
REP Jan 2012 #2
closeupready Jan 2012 #3
tawadi Jan 2012 #4
livetohike Feb 2012 #5
elbloggoZY27 Jul 2012 #6
elbloggoZY27 Jul 2012 #7
Scairp Jul 2012 #8
raccoon Aug 2012 #10
ailsagirl Aug 2012 #9
crimeauthor Mar 2013 #12
crimeauthor Mar 2013 #11

Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Thu Dec 22, 2011, 11:57 PM

1. absolutely!

I read many books about psychopaths and I think everyone should be aware of the fact that there are certain individuals out there without a conscience. The fact that they come off as charming makes them all the more dangerous.

Reading books about such individuals has made me aware that I'm going to run across one or two or maybe even more at some point in my life.


Cher

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Mon Jan 2, 2012, 08:56 PM

2. I wish I could justify it that way :-)

I'm more interested in the broken minds and how they got that way as well as the investigation. Most victims - not all; anyone can be a victim - but most victims of the most notorious crimes lead lives far different than the one I (or most of here) do. Which brings me to a well-worn rant: many killers are often not pursued vigorously until a victim is of the "valued" class - that is, a child or middle-class victim.

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Tue Jan 3, 2012, 02:54 PM

3. To some extent, probably. But

 

I've also been a violent crime victim, so I have also learned from my own mistakes about who to trust and where not to walk at night, when to listen to your instincts, etc.

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Sun Jan 29, 2012, 06:07 PM

4. Learning about real life has. eom

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Mon Feb 6, 2012, 01:32 PM

5. It's made me less naive and more cautious,

but not paranoid. I've always enjoyed reading true crime novels, mostly because the psychology of the perp and the victim(s) is interesting to me and so I think it has given me some knowledge that I might not find otherwise.

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Wed Jul 4, 2012, 01:21 PM

6. Texas Murder

 

A young Bosnian female from Germany was murdered the other day in Texas and it sure smells like she was targeted. Anybody who has some information needs to call the police or FBI and help solve this crime.

I am a advocate for children and crimes against them. Every day on the news or Internet you read about another child being kidnapped, murdered or abused and it is an epidemic here in the United States.

Teach your children street sense and let them take self defense courses like the Martial Arts. BE STREET SMART.

Have a great safe and fun July 04,2012.

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Sat Jul 21, 2012, 12:19 PM

7. Cousins Missing/Abducted ?

 

Last edited Sat Jul 21, 2012, 06:27 PM - Edit history (1)

Two young female cousins disappeared in Iowa and their bicycles found abandoned by Meyer Lake. Some evidence found.

There is a $50,000.00 reward. There appears to be an Interstate Highway that runs past the lake.

Somebody may know what happened. Call the Iowa State Police or FBI.


There is a Perpetrator out there.

It is my understanding based on a news story today that the FBI in Iowa believes that the two cousins are alive and asking for any information that may find these young girls.

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Tue Jul 24, 2012, 07:22 PM

8. NO

Last edited Wed Jul 25, 2012, 01:11 AM - Edit history (1)

It only makes you more afraid than you need to be. Bad things can happen out of the blue and there are only so many things you can guard against. Everyone thinks there is an epidemic of stranger abductions of children but the facts are that only about 200, or less, of these traditional type kidnappings by total strangers targeting children, or a specific child.

I meant to add per YEAR.

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Response to Scairp (Reply #8)

Wed Aug 29, 2012, 03:39 PM

10. ITA about the kidnapping--people are WAY too afraid of stranger kidnappings. nt

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Tue Aug 28, 2012, 02:17 PM

9. It has made me more cautious, but then, I was raised to be so

When I read Ann Rule's 'Stranger Beside Me,' I would often put myself in the shoes of the victims, that is, were I in that situation, how would I react? Take the period during which Bundy feigned a broken arm in an effort to get women to help him carry something to his VW, which was just around the bend. I believe all the women he asked agreed, but one balked upon reaching the car. Now, if a nice, handsome man in a cast asked me to help him, I would absolutely refuse. The point wasn't that he was nice-seeming and attractive, the point was that he was a complete stranger and you never get into a stranger's car. And that includes hitch-hiking!

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Response to ailsagirl (Reply #9)

Fri Mar 29, 2013, 01:22 AM

12. Bundy

Remember, though, we are talking about the 70's... we were more trusting then. Also, he was very charming and persuasive.
I too like to think I wouldn't fall for it, but to bend over to help pick up a good-looking guy's books that he dropped because his arm was in a cast?
I'd have to think about that one...

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Response to BlueIris (Original post)

Fri Mar 29, 2013, 01:00 AM

11. INVISIBLE KILLER: The Monster Behind the Mask

We just finished, my book partner and I, a book about serial killer Charlie Brandt.
Everyone referred to him as a "really great guy," "a great friend," "very gentle."
Nobody knew he had killed his eight-month pregnant mother when he was 13. He was released from the State Mental Hospital after a year.
He killed Sherry Perisho under the Big Pine Tree Bridge, and disemboweled her, using the bottom of her dinghy as a cutting board. He killed disemboweled a protitute in Miami. And he ended up killing his own wife, stabbing her seven times, and killing and dissecting her niece, in Altamonte Springs.
This is why we call him "invisible killer." To this day, friends of the wife and the niece have said to me, "How could I not have known?"
We have a page on Facebook with the same title:
Invisible Killer: The Monster Behind the Mask.
You are welcome to look.
Thanks!
Diana

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