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Tue Aug 15, 2017, 06:00 PM

Watching the eclipse with your smart phone.


So I live close to the zone of totality and eclipse glasses are sold out nearly everywhere.

Somone said to me that they plan on viewing the eclipsed sun via their smart phone.

I assume this would protect the eyes, but is that assumption, correct?

Also, would it damage the camera, screen, or other parts of the phone?

I feel like an idiot for asking, but I thought I should.

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Reply Watching the eclipse with your smart phone. (Original post)
aikoaiko Aug 2017 OP
CaliforniaPeggy Aug 2017 #1
aikoaiko Aug 2017 #3
Thor_MN Aug 2017 #2
aikoaiko Aug 2017 #4

Response to aikoaiko (Original post)

Tue Aug 15, 2017, 06:07 PM

1. If you're using the phone as a camera, then you must take the same precautions as that.

In other words, solar filter over the camera's eyepiece (equivalent to the end of the lens on a camera) during the partial phases of the eclipse.

You take the filter off during (and only during) totality.

Yes, the direct, unprotected sun WILL injure your phone, just as it would your eyes.



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Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #1)

Tue Aug 15, 2017, 07:59 PM

3. Thank you.

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Response to aikoaiko (Original post)

Tue Aug 15, 2017, 07:49 PM

2. The only safe way to watch the eclipse with your smart phone is to stream it.

 

As in, watch a stream of it from a site where they have the proper filters.

Your phone camera won't be able to see anything, assuming that it doesn't get burned out aimed at the sun too long.

>DURING< totality, after all the bright spots have gone away, you can look at it with your naked eyes, but be aware it is going to last less than two minutes, at best.

I envy you your geographic advantage, I'm in Minnesota and will have to make do with a pinhole view...

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Response to Thor_MN (Reply #2)

Tue Aug 15, 2017, 07:59 PM

4. Thank you.

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