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Sun Nov 19, 2017, 09:25 AM

Neuroscientists have identified how exactly a deep breath changes your mind

Neuroscientists have identified how exactly a deep breath changes your mind



In times of stress, science shows focusing on breathing can really help. (Reuters/Lucy Pemoni)


WRITTEN BY
Moran Cerf
Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
1 hour ago

Breathing is traditionally thought of as an automatic process driven by the brainstem—the part of the brain controlling such life-sustaining functions as heartbeat and sleeping patterns. But new and unique research, involving recordings made directly from within the brains of humans undergoing neurosurgery, shows that breathing can also change your brain.

Simply put, changes in breathing—for example, breathing at different paces or paying careful attention to the breaths—were shown to engage different parts of the brain.

Humans’ ability to control and regulate their brain is unique: e.g., controlling emotions, deciding to stay awake despite being tired, or suppressing thoughts. These abilities are not trivial, nor do humans share them with many animals. Breathing is similar: animals do not alter their breathing speed volitionally; their breathing normally only changes in response to running, resting, etc. Questions that have baffled scientists in this context are: why are humans capable of volitionally regulating their breathing, and how do we gain access to parts of our brain that are not normally under our conscious control. Additionally, is there any benefit in our ability to access and control parts of our brain that are typically inaccessible? Given that many therapies—Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, trauma therapy, or various types of spiritual exercises—involve focusing and regulating breathing, does controlling inhaling and exhaling have any profound effect on behavior?

This recent study finally answers these questions by showing that volitionally controlling our respirational, even merely focusing on one’s breathing, yield additional access and synchrony between brain areas. This understanding may lead to greater control, focus, calmness, and emotional control.

More:
https://qz.com/1132986/neuroscientists-have-identified-how-exactly-a-deep-breath-changes-your-mind/

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Reply Neuroscientists have identified how exactly a deep breath changes your mind (Original post)
Judi Lynn Nov 2017 OP
lindalou65 Nov 2017 #1
ms liberty Nov 2017 #2
blimablam Nov 2017 #3
Dream Girl Nov 2017 #4
RandomAccess Nov 2017 #5

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 19, 2017, 12:09 PM

1. Breathing and stress

Thanks for posting this. An interesting article.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 19, 2017, 12:10 PM

2. K&R. Very interesting. n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 19, 2017, 12:28 PM

3. thats pretty cool

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 19, 2017, 01:20 PM

4. Thanks for posting. Fascinating stuff!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Nov 19, 2017, 11:28 PM

5. Ah, so modern science begins to catch up with

 

the yogis with their pranayama.

Actually, this does give possible new insight into those ancient practices.

A few weeks ago I enrolled in a course/program from NeuroGym, which is run by John Assaraff. It's based entirely on neuroscience and consists primarily of lectures, audiotapes to listen to daily that are simply wild, homework, and some other stuff. The first week's audiotape made me into a different person and even changed my handwriting! I was elated. My handwriting had gotten irrepressibly sloppy and nearly unreadable, and by the end of that week it was back to my normal old handwriting for the first time in a couple of years. The program has had a very positive effect on my life overall I think I need to go back and listen to Week 1 some more.

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