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Mon Apr 27, 2020, 07:48 AM

Could virophages be a way to stop or slow Covid-19?

I am searching for info, and so far only mention I have turned up is that the virophages only infect giant viruses and that the covid-19 is not a giant virus.
Appreciate any referrals if anyone has more info..

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Reply Could virophages be a way to stop or slow Covid-19? (Original post)
ellenrr Apr 2020 OP
Anon-C Apr 2020 #1

Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Mon Apr 27, 2020, 10:01 AM

1. Interesting field of study, here's what I could find:


*UC San Diego School of Medicine
Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics

https://medschool.ucsd.edu/som/medicine/divisions/idgph/research/center-innovative-phage-applications-and-therapeutics/Pages/default.aspx

https://www.motherjones.com/environment/2018/05/the-best-viral-news-youll-ever-read-antibiotic-resistance-phage-therapy-bacteriophage-virus/

He Was Dying. Antibiotics Weren’t Working. Then Doctors Tried a Forgotten Treatment.
Phages are making a comeback.
MARYN MCKENNA
MAY/JUNE 2018 ISSUE

Excerpt:
...

To understand how phage therapy works, it helps to know a little biology, starting with the distinction between bacteria and viruses. Most of the drug-resistant superbugs that cause medical havoc are bacteria, microscopic single-celled organisms that do most of the things that other living things do: seek nutrition, metabolize it into energy, produce offspring. Viruses, which are much smaller than bacteria, exist only to reproduce: They attach to a cell, hijack its reproductive machinery to make fresh viruses, and then, in most cases, explode the cell to let viral copies float free.

Phages are viruses. In the wild, they are the cleanup crew that keeps bacteria from taking over the world. Bacteria reproduce relentlessly, a new generation every 20 minutes or so, and phages kill them just as rapidly, preventing the burgeoning bacterial biomass from swamping the planet like a B-movie slime monster. But phages do not kill indiscriminately: Though there are trillions in the world, each is tuned evolutionarily to destroy only particular bacteria. In 1917, a self-taught microbiologist named Félix d’Herelle recognized phages’ talent for targeted killing. He imagined that if he could find the correct phages, he could use them to cure deadly bacterial infections.

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