HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Science » Science (Group) » World's oldest known cave...

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:06 PM

World's oldest known cave painting found in Indonesia

January 13, 2021
Agence France-Presse via Raw Story

Archaeologists have discovered the world's oldest known cave painting: a life-sized picture of a wild pig that was made at least 45,500 years ago in Indonesia.

The finding described in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday provides the earliest evidence of human settlement of the region.

Co-author Maxime Aubert of Australia's Griffith University told AFP it was found on the island of Sulawesi in 2017 by doctoral student Basran Burhan, as part of surveys the team was carrying out with Indonesian authorities.
Tired of ads? Want to support our progressive journalism? Click to learn more.

The Leang Tedongnge cave is located in a remote valley enclosed by sheer limestone cliffs, about an hour's walk from the nearest road.

https://www.rawstory.com/worlds-oldest-known-cave-painting-found-in-indonesia/


6 replies, 681 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply World's oldest known cave painting found in Indonesia (Original post)
Wicked Blue Jan 13 OP
Arne Jan 13 #1
Wicked Blue Jan 13 #3
Warpy Jan 13 #5
jpak Jan 13 #2
mitch96 Jan 13 #6
DBoon Jan 13 #4

Response to Wicked Blue (Original post)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:10 PM

1. Could they have been preparing dinner as he painted this?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Arne (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:22 PM

3. It's the menu

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Arne (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:32 PM

5. Could have been boasting about a hunt or hoping for something on the menu

It might have been a bored, artistically talented teenager of either sex decorating a wall. We just don't know after 45,000 years.

We do know it was a popular activity and that ancient people accessed some of the most difficult areas of deep caves to decorate.

I just wonder what they used for lighting, of if they did these things in the dark and from memory. A loit of paintings were high up and light from a pine knot or other smoky source would have poisoned them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Wicked Blue (Original post)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:14 PM

2. Are the hands the artist's signature?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jpak (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 05:22 PM

6. I think it's interesting that in many of these ancient cave drawings there is the hand print..

Blown colored pigment to say " I was here"...
I wonder if he got the idea off of Facebook? Painting class?
m

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Wicked Blue (Original post)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 03:22 PM

4. Science News link

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/oldest-known-cave-painting-art-pig-found-indonesia

Inside a cave on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, scientists have found one of the oldest known artistic depictions of a real-world object or organism. It’s a painting of a warty pig, an animal still found on Sulawesi, that was rendered on the cave’s back wall at least 45,500 years ago, researchers report January 13 in Science Advances.

The discovery adds to evidence that “the first modern human cave art traditions did not emerge in Ice Age Europe, as long supposed, but perhaps earlier in Asia or even in Africa, where our species evolved,” says study author Adam Brumm, an archaeologist at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.

At least two, and possibly three, other partially preserved pig paintings appear on the cave wall near the newly dated figure. All of the painted pigs in the Sulawesi cave appear to be confronting each other in a scene of some sort, says archaeologist Iain Davidson of the University of New England in Armidale, Australia. Similarly positioned, painted animals dating to roughly 30,000 years ago or more appear in scenes in France’s Chauvet Cave, says Davidson, who did not participate in the new study.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread