HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Science » Anthropology (Group) » You Can Now Look At The F...

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 03:04 AM

You Can Now Look At The Faces Of Some Of Britain's Earliest Inhabitants



Rosie McCall
By Rosie McCall
31 JAN 2019, 10:53

Thanks to an exhibition at the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery in the UK (open Tuesday to Sunday, 10am to 5pm), you can now take a look at some of Britain's oldest residents.

The museum opened the doors to their shiny new Elaine Evans Archaeology Gallery last weekend, where they are displaying facial reconstructions of those who lived in southern England (and places slightly further afield) thousands of years ago. The collection includes a young Neolithic woman, a Cro-Magnon man sporting a hipster-like beard, and a Neanderthal. Together, these individuals span 40,000 years of European history.

The man responsible for resurrecting these characters is archaeologist and sculptor Oscar Nilsson, whose previous work has included a 9,000-year-old teen and a 1,200-year-old Peruvian queen.

To create their likeness, he starts with a 3D replica of the skull and builds on it, determining the thickness of the skin and other tissue from the origin, sex, and age of the person in question. Next, he "colors it in", basing his color choices on genome studies that reveal the eye, skin, and hair color of different human populations.

More:
https://www.iflscience.com/editors-blog/take-a-look-at-some-of-britains-oldest-residents-0/

3 replies, 946 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 3 replies Author Time Post
Reply You Can Now Look At The Faces Of Some Of Britain's Earliest Inhabitants (Original post)
Judi Lynn Feb 2019 OP
GeoWilliam750 Feb 2019 #1
UpInArms Feb 2019 #2
bronxiteforever Feb 2019 #3

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 03:09 AM

1. Cool!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 09:55 AM

2. Wow ... that is fascinating


The Whitehawk woman (above) is named after the place of her burial the Whitehawk suburb of Brighton. She lived around 5,500 years ago during the Neolithic period and is just 4 foot 9 inches (1.45 meters) tall, small even for the time. Studies on the skeleton reveal she was born on the Welsh border but moved to Sussex, where she was buried. There are no signs of illness or injury. However, fetal bones found around her pelvis indicate she probably died in childbirth.

....

And beautiful.... thank you for posting

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 10:10 AM

3. Thanks for posting Judi Lynn. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread