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Thu Nov 28, 2019, 12:49 AM

Painting in the Americas before European colonization

Just discovered this site unintentionally, saw it is so interesting it needs to be seen as it has so much to examine! Don't forget to check all the wonderful live links, as they lead beyond the page, of course, to completely interesting images and information. Looks like a great place to spend some time!






Tepantitla at Teotihuacan. The Mountain of Abundance mural, also known as the “Paradise of Tlaloc”. Circa 450-600 AD, original fresco.

Painting in the Americas before European colonization is the Precolumbian painting traditions of the Americas. Painting was a relatively widespread, popular and diverse means of communication and expression for both religious and utilitarian purpose throughout the regions of the Western Hemisphere. During the period before and after European exploration and settlement of the Americas; including North America, Central America, South America and the islands of the Caribbean, the Bahamas, the West Indies, the Antilles, the Lesser Antilles and other island groups, indigenous native cultures produced a wide variety of visual arts, including painting on textiles, hides, rock and cave surfaces, bodies especially faces, ceramics, architectural features including interior murals, wood panels, and other available surfaces. Many of the perishable surfaces, such as woven textiles, typically have not been preserved, but Precolumbian painting on ceramics, walls, and rocks have survived more frequently.

The oldest known paintings in the South America are the cave paintings of Caverna da Pedra Pintada, in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that date back 11,200 years.[1] The earliest known painting in North America is the Cooper Bison Skull found near Fort Supply, Oklahoma, dated to 10,200 BCE.[2]

Painting in the Americas before colonization
Main articles: Native American art, Maya art, Pre-Columbian art, and Indigenous peoples of the Americas

Each continent of the Americas hosted societies that were unique and individually developed cultures; that produced totems, works of religious symbolism, and decorative and expressive painted works. African influence was especially strong in the art of the Caribbean and South America. The arts of the indigenous people of the Americas had an enormous impact and influence on European art and vice versa during and after the Age of Exploration. Spain, Portugal, France, The Netherlands and England were all powerful and influential colonial powers in the Americas during and after the 15th century. By the 19th century cultural influence began to flow both ways across the Atlantic.

Mesoamerica
See also: Mesoamerican writing systems, Oasisamerica, Aridoamerica, and Aztec calendar stone

The murals of Teotihuacan that adorn the archaeological site (and others, like the Wagner Murals, found in private collections) and from hieroglyphic inscriptions made by the Maya describing their encounters with Teotihuacano conquerors are the source of most of what is understood about that ancient civilization. The painting of the murals, perhaps thousands of them, reached its zenith between 450 and 650 CE. The painters' artistry was unrivalled in Mesoamerica and has been compared with that of Florence, Italy.[3]

More:
https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Painting_in_the_Americas_before_European_colonization

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Reply Painting in the Americas before European colonization (Original post)
Judi Lynn Nov 28 OP
WheelWalker Nov 28 #1
Judi Lynn Tuesday #4
safeinOhio Nov 28 #2
Judi Lynn Tuesday #5
alfredo Dec 1 #3
Judi Lynn Tuesday #6
alfredo Tuesday #7
RestoreAmerica2020 Thursday #8

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Nov 28, 2019, 01:10 AM

1. Superb. Thank you so much for sharing.

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Response to WheelWalker (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 3, 2019, 02:44 AM

4. Thank you for taking the time to examine it. n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Nov 28, 2019, 03:22 AM

2. First thing I noticed was that

all the figures have their faces facing side ways. Except the one on top of mountain, that is facing us.

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Response to safeinOhio (Reply #2)

Tue Dec 3, 2019, 02:48 AM

5. Stunned to read you spotted a face not facing away. I missed that one totally.

Thank you so much for letting those of us who wouldn't have caught know it was there!

So frustrating seeing it means something one can probably never divine, most likely! Whoever knew kept it a secret, it appears.

Very kind to point it out.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Dec 1, 2019, 11:39 PM

3. Thank you

Coming out of their mouths has to be singing or speaking.

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Response to alfredo (Reply #3)

Tue Dec 3, 2019, 02:53 AM

6. It does pull a person in closer. It seems so much like communication, but unknowable

at this stage....

If only....

Thank you.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #6)

Tue Dec 3, 2019, 10:21 AM

7. I will have to do some reading on this.

I noticed no women. Still haven't found waldo

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Dec 5, 2019, 04:36 PM

8. Fascinating!. Thanks for post and link. Paz.

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