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Sun Apr 20, 2014, 12:56 PM

 

What I like to remember for Easter (bible inconsistencies and contradictions):

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Reply What I like to remember for Easter (bible inconsistencies and contradictions): (Original post)
Vashta Nerada Apr 2014 OP
Stuckinthebush Apr 2014 #1
onager Apr 2014 #2
trotsky Apr 2014 #4
onager Apr 2014 #5
Arugula Latte Apr 2014 #3
nil desperandum Apr 2014 #6
Vashta Nerada Apr 2014 #7
nil desperandum Apr 2014 #8

Response to Vashta Nerada (Original post)

Sun Apr 20, 2014, 08:48 PM

1. Good stuff!

Add in the clerical errors and redevelopment of the texts to conform with various socio-political needs over 2000 years and you get a really muddled "book" of tales.

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Response to Stuckinthebush (Reply #1)

Mon Apr 21, 2014, 06:11 PM

2. Lots of fascinating history in that.

Like all the back-and-forth when Constantine was trying to give Xianity a religious monopoly.

As most of us know, Xianity splintered into a gaggle of combative sects right from the start. Some had their own Holy Texts incorporating paganism, or Greek philosophy, or who knows what-all.

One of Constantine's biggest headaches came from Alexandria, Egypt, where two powerful church leaders battled for years over the nature of Christ. In those days, Alexandria was a power center of the Church, second only to Constantinople itself. (Rome was just one more Bishopric and not an especially influential one. Despite later propaganda to the contrary.)

In this corner: Athanasius. A truly nasty piece of work who organized gangs of thugs to attack his opponents on the streets of Alexandria. Claimed Christ was part of God.

And in that corner: Arias, who claimed Christ was separate from God and fully human.

That little squabble led to, among other things, the Council of Nicaea and the Nicene Creed. Which settled everything - HA! - by simply stating that Christ was "of the same substance" as God. Whatever that substance is...

But even after the Creed supposedly settled everything, Constantine kept changing his mind. He sent letters to Athanasius telling him to go easy on Arias and his followers.

Everybody else was just as confused. Arias was branded a heretic at one church Council, exonerated by the next Council, then declared a heretic AGAIN at a third Council.

Maybe it's no wonder that when Arias finally died, one story says Athanasius publicly danced for joy thru Alexandria's streets.

In 641, a new god came to live in Alexandria. His name was Allah and he didn't give a damn about the nature of Christ. The former grand Church of Athanasius became the Attarine Mosque, which you can still visit in Alexandria today.

And to this day, Xians are still stuck with trying to explain the baffling Trinitarian bullshit in the Nicene Creed. Which serves them right.

/pedantry

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Response to onager (Reply #2)

Mon Apr 21, 2014, 08:18 PM

4. Damn.

I just love reading your posts, onager.

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Response to trotsky (Reply #4)

Mon Apr 21, 2014, 11:38 PM

5. Thanks, but I steal nearly everything.

Most of that I stole from Charles Freeman's amazing book, "The Closing of the Western Mind: The Rise of Faith and the Fall of Reason." A fantastic read.

Weirdly, in his next book, Freeman dedicated the Foreword to bashing Richard Dawkins. Freeman wrote that he "enjoyed discussing religion" and seemed to have some goofy idea that Dawkins wanted to ban such discussions. Or something.

And I had the advantage of living in Alexandria, where I read lots of books about the history of the city.

E.M. Forster wrote one of the best, when he was serving as a medic in Alexandria during World War I. "Alexandria - A History and a Guide." And it really is a combination history and guidebook. I used to take that book, or notes from it, and get on the same streetcar routes Forster mentioned in the book. Most of them were still running pretty much the same as they did when he lived there.

One day I was getting on a rare street car that was nearly deserted. I could sit anywhere! Only 2 other people were in the car, a young woman and a little girl. Sat down and opened my book.

The woman started talking to me, rather excitedly, in Arabic. And making "get out" motions with her hands.

Fortunately the little girl spoke a little English. She said, "This is the Women's Tram. If the conductor catches you sitting in here, he will fine you 50 pounds."

50 pounds was only a couple of bucks. But I sure didn't want the hassle, so I thanked the kid profusely and left. While also thanking the Egyptian school that started teaching English at a very young age...

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Response to Vashta Nerada (Original post)

Mon Apr 21, 2014, 07:42 PM

3. What a mess.

 

I think about the time and effort that has been wasted over the centuries hashing out these differences in ludicrous fairy tales ... such a waste.

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Response to Vashta Nerada (Original post)

Tue Apr 22, 2014, 10:57 AM

6. Inconsistencies

Hey now, don't spoil a good fairy tale with some accurate observations of obvious falsehoods and mythological story telling...

Remember, religious fundamentalists of all stripes don't need no stinkin' facts....everything that's important to know is in their little magic books...along with a host of inconsistent tripe that even their most dedicated scholars squirm to explain...watch a muslim try to explain away the whole bit about treating infidels with cruelty...it's quite entertaining...at least in the US, in the rest of the world question their little magic man will get you killed...ya gotta love the openly tolerant minds of zealots...

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Response to nil desperandum (Reply #6)

Tue Apr 22, 2014, 01:44 PM

7. I know your post is sarcastic, but I don't tolerate people's idiotic beliefs.

 

Especially when those beliefs hurt the advancement of science.

I'm kind of a bigger jerk about it than Dawkins and Myers.

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Response to Vashta Nerada (Reply #7)

Tue Apr 22, 2014, 02:07 PM

8. Nice

That works for me, I understand your position and I believe that religion has done it's level best to maintain control through corrupting the political process in many nations, including our own...

Fairy tales are indeed just fairy tales....because some weak minded fools need to think there is a higher power watching their every move doesn't make that less true. That those weak minded fools feel the need to jam that crap down my throat in spite of the protections afforded under the constitution of our natural rights is for me, and should be for everyone, a serious concern.

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