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Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:23 PM

 

Why don't millennials vote in the numbers they represent?

I pray that what happened with Brexit doesn't happen here. And it won't if the millennials GOTV for the Dems up and down ticket.

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Reply Why don't millennials vote in the numbers they represent? (Original post)
glennward Jun 2016 OP
tonyt53 Jun 2016 #1
NurseJackie Jun 2016 #5
cwydro Jun 2016 #16
akbacchus_BC Jun 2016 #26
HassleCat Jun 2016 #2
LonePirate Jun 2016 #3
silvershadow Jun 2016 #11
LonePirate Jun 2016 #13
silvershadow Jun 2016 #15
KittyWampus Jun 2016 #18
SheilaT Jun 2016 #4
Sancho Jun 2016 #6
TheCowsCameHome Jun 2016 #7
BlueStater Jun 2016 #14
Scootaloo Jun 2016 #28
Travis_0004 Jun 2016 #36
beachbum bob Jun 2016 #8
JI7 Jun 2016 #10
silvershadow Jun 2016 #12
JI7 Jun 2016 #9
forjusticethunders Jun 2016 #17
name not needed Jun 2016 #19
JustABozoOnThisBus Jun 2016 #40
Xyzse Jun 2016 #20
Exilednight Jun 2016 #21
Starry Messenger Jun 2016 #22
forjusticethunders Jun 2016 #34
Starry Messenger Jun 2016 #37
Nye Bevan Jun 2016 #23
JI7 Jun 2016 #24
Scootaloo Jun 2016 #29
akbacchus_BC Jun 2016 #25
hack89 Jun 2016 #38
Lord Magus Jun 2016 #27
Recursion Jun 2016 #30
Just reading posts Jun 2016 #31
Go Vols Jun 2016 #32
Ash_F Jun 2016 #33
CobaltBlue Jun 2016 #35
zenabby Jun 2016 #39

Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:23 PM

1. Young people just do not take voting seriously - yeah, I was young once.

 

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:55 PM

5. That. And, I think many are impatient and want immediate results, and instant gratification...

... and, if they don't get it, many assume that it's not worthwhile to vote, or assume that everything is "rigged".

(I was young once too.)

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:20 PM

16. I've voted in every election since I came of age to do so.

No excuse not to vote imo.

I know a lot of millennials. Few of them seem to give a crap about voting. A shame.

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Response to tonyt53 (Reply #1)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:26 AM

26. I beg to differ! Young people do take voting seriously. Which group voted more

for Senator Obama, the young people! Who are more behind Mr. Sanders, the young people. You folks need to stop thinking that young people are only into posting on social media. They pay attention and they vote!

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:30 PM

2. As they look up and down the ticket

 

They might not find as many people as they would like who deserve the title "Democrat."

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Response to HassleCat (Reply #2)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:38 PM

3. Until they show up to vote, their definition of who is and is not a Democrat doesn't matter.

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Response to LonePirate (Reply #3)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:07 PM

11. Until the candidate is there who excites them, it would seem voting doesn't matter?

 

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Response to silvershadow (Reply #11)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:14 PM

13. Voting seldom offers a buffet of choices where you choose your favorite.

Voters can choose from the limited choices on the menu or they can go without. Many millennials prefer to go without.

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Response to LonePirate (Reply #13)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:16 PM

15. Gerrymandering is just one of many problems that affects the choices on the

 

non-existent buffet. Many would prefer candidates much further to the left than currently exist. I can't fault them for not voting if they choose not too. What I *can fault them for is not running for office, if they see the void there.

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Response to silvershadow (Reply #11)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:44 PM

18. Voting for candidates shouldn't be about excitment, IMO. It's not like dating... or American Idol.

 

It's called "Civic Duty".

It about responsibility and caring about things greater than ones self.

But perhaps those things come with age.

I'm not arguing with you, btw.

I've had jobs that I wasn't excited about but got up every day and did them. But it sure makes it easier when you do like your job.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:50 PM

4. Young people are always slow to come to voting.

 

It's been that way pretty much from the beginning.

One reason given for lowering the voting age to 18 from 21 was that it would get young people to vote in greater numbers. While obviously, there are those who are between 18 and 21 who do vote, it's not in the large numbers originally predicted. But almost anyone who used to be young could have told you that.

It doesn't help that in this country simply getting registered to vote can be a huge hassle, even in states where the Republicans haven't subverted the registration and voting process.

As the Millennials get older, they will be more reliable and frequent voters.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 02:56 PM

6. Young people don't vote...

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 03:13 PM

7. It requires work.

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Response to TheCowsCameHome (Reply #7)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:15 PM

14. Screw your idiotic stereotypes.

This kind of comment is something I expect to see on Free Republic, not here.

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Response to TheCowsCameHome (Reply #7)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:37 AM

28. No, in fact it doesn't

 

Which is why so many people want election days to be work holidays. So we can go vote without endangering our jobs.

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Response to Scootaloo (Reply #28)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 06:33 AM

36. I don't think thats necessary

 

Plus, a lot of businesses won't close anyway even if it was a holiday.

Where I live, we have early voting, and no excuse absentee voting. If somebody doesn't vote, it probably because they didn't want to.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 03:23 PM

8. Too hard to pry away from their cell phones

 

....now if they could vote by phone....people would pay more attention to them as a voting block

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Response to beachbum bob (Reply #8)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 03:31 PM

10. it was true of younger people before cell phones also

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Response to beachbum bob (Reply #8)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:08 PM

12. Actually I wish we could vote by phone...providing we can somehow lock down

 

the important things that secure the integrity of the vote. Right now, we don't even have that with the electronic machines under corporate control.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 03:29 PM

9. younger people usually have low turnout. it was true of previous younger generations also

It's not just a millenials thing

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 04:36 PM

17. It's a combination of things

 

Less settled, more chaotic work schedules, yes part of it is maturity too.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 05:06 PM

19. We're too busy having unprotected sex and listening to that damned rap music.

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Response to name not needed (Reply #19)

Sun Jun 26, 2016, 07:52 AM

40. Ok, you win, these are completely acceptable, laudable excuses.

Except for that damned rap music.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 06:53 PM

20. Better question is...

Why can't politicians energize them to vote.

In regards to the primaries it would have meant pigeon holing themselves to a party and many don't want that.

It also makes them unable to vote then.
During the actual general elections many fail to see the difference between the parties as both tends to ask for votes while breaking promises, where all they expect sometimes is to at least fight for them.

I'm going to vote as I consider it a duty. Not everyone feels that way.

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Response to Xyzse (Reply #20)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 07:32 PM

21. Very good points. I would also add that they don't see themselves in the candidates. They see

Their parents or grandparents as the people running the country. Very few young people run for office at any level. If more people in their later 20s ran for the House, we might actually see more younger people vote.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 07:59 PM

22. My stepson said that once he was settled in life he felt it was time to pay attention to politics.

He just turned 27. Maybe there are other young people who feel that way. I never read political news or did vote much in college. Once you are out in the world and see your place in the system, you connect the dots a little more.

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Response to Starry Messenger (Reply #22)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 02:18 AM

34. For me I've always been interested in politics

 

But I just hit 27 too and this is the first time I'm thinking of taking a more boots on the ground activist role.

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Response to forjusticethunders (Reply #34)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 08:19 AM

37. You're definitely way ahead of where I was. :)

I think looking at things like Brexit, where people were not educated about what their vote meant, shows that active outreach and not just leaving things to the chance people might just have an educated opinion, really matters.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Fri Jun 24, 2016, 11:19 PM

23. Too busy on Snapchat and Instagram (nt)

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Response to Nye Bevan (Reply #23)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:13 AM

24. why didn't the same age group vote before there was snapchat and instagram ?

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Response to Nye Bevan (Reply #23)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:39 AM

29. And we're on your lawn, with our jungle music turned up too loud.

 

My hair is too long and my girlfriend wears short sleeves, too.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:20 AM

25. Why are the millennials now responsible for voting? Time and time shows that older

voters do not turn out. I would be angry if am blamed as a millennial for low voter turn out!

Am not a millennial by the way but I dislike the blame game!

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Response to akbacchus_BC (Reply #25)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 09:45 AM

38. Older voters historically have the highest voting rates

While younger voters historically have the lowest voting rates.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:34 AM

27. It's not going to happen here.

The UK is considerably less diverse than the US, and xenophobia has broader appeal there.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 12:58 AM

30. Boomers and Xers didn't at their age either

Just one of those things.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 01:04 AM

31. Young people never do. Probably for the largely the same reason many of them don't save for

 

retirement. They don't give due consideration to the long term.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 01:04 AM

32. Stupid is all I can figure

I voted for Jimmy in '80 @ 18.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 01:55 AM

33. Cynicism

ps - I don't blame them

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 05:11 AM

35. Well…

 

When I was following the 2016 Democratic presidential primaries, the two youngest voting-age groups of 17 [18] to 29 and 30 to 44 underperformed in participation. The youngest should have been about 18 to 20 percent the size of the vote. The 30 to 44 should have been about 30 percent. (In some cases, the 30 to 44, more so than the 17 [18] to 29, voters really did not turn out the vote.) Together, they combine for 50 percent normally for general elections … making them even with the two oldest voting-age groups, 45 to 64 and 65+. A key reason why particular states carried for Hillary Clinton, over Bernie Sanders, by +5 or less percentage points was because the 60 percent (in some cases, 61 or 62 percent) size of a state's overall vote, specially by those 45 to 64 and 65+, delivered those eked-out wins to Hillary. So the lesson is: show up.

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Response to glennward (Original post)

Sat Jun 25, 2016, 09:36 PM

39. Something about the age war

is bothering me.. In Brexit as well as here, the younger generation (millennials) seem to think that older people who don't think their way are stupid, are going to die soon and are deciding for younger generation. I am against Brexit, but the younger generation don't realize the older people were younger too, and they have exactly the same right to vote and have their voices heard as much as the millennials. The older votes don't weigh less and it shouldn't. They have earned the right to vote. On Bill Maher yesterday, there was this 16 year old who said everyone was "crushing their voices" or something like that. Hey, you are not special because you are younger. You are not smarter or better. You may be the future, but I am the present. I've lived a bit longer, seen a bit more than you and am using my sane judgement. If you want your voices to be heard, then please go out and vote. Don't disparage the older voters.

And yes, if you lose by 48-52, it's still losing. The biggest success of democracy is the peaceful transfer of power and acceptance of losing. Al Gore peacefully accepted it even though he won the popular vote. That's what makes us great. Obama won 51.1% to Romney's 47.2%. Yes, almost 48% of the voters voted for Romney. But we don't get to have a Romney platform or republican presidency. That's how it works. Sorry.

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