HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » JHB » Journal
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 34 Next »

JHB

Profile Information

Gender: Do not display
Current location: Somewhere in the NYC metropolitan statistical area
Member since: 2001
Number of posts: 34,014

Journal Archives

'Cancel Culture' Is About the Past, Not the Future

From 2009: Learn to Speak Tea Bag

Insist Republicans speak English Only. Real English, not that weird conservative dialect they have with Calvinball rules for definitions.

Joe Biden Is Right - The Professional Left with Driftglass & Blue Gal

Podcast. 57 min. You can probably skip to the ~14:40 mark.

Rubin (WaPo): Biden should defend local officials against tyrannical GOP governors

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/08/10/biden-should-defend-local-officials-against-tyrannical-gop-governors/

The Republican Party used to hold fast to the mantra that the government closest to the people governs best. It also used to support latitude among local governments to improvise as “laboratories of democracy” on everything from school curriculum to zoning and policing, under the assumption that lower levels of government are more responsive to voters.

No longer. Today, Republicans are on a binge of micromanaging local actors and punishing those who do not knuckle under. Now it’s up to the Biden administration to protect local leaders from their overreach.

***

Local officials resisting their governors’ edicts in Texas and Florida underscore the wisdom of the “go local” philosophy that used to animate the GOP. Voters in these communities are siding with their local leaders, asking for mask and vaccine mandates. If only bullying Republican governors still believed in their own principles.

The Biden administration and Democrats more generally should ride to the rescue of local actors battling intrusion by reckless, hyperpartisan governors. The feds can intervene in cases to defend local officials and protect them from fines and punishment. The administration can stand shoulder to shoulder with local school officials trying to save lives and those trying to protect democracy. Democrats might even remind their political opponents that the government closest to the people often knows best.

TOON Bonus 2 - Hobbes And Bacon

Since I posted The Compleat Bloom'n Hobbes earlier, I thought I'd add another loving continuation/tribute to Calvin And Hobbes.

These appeared in an online comic strip by Dan and Tom Heyerman called Pants are Overrated in 2011. Between May and October 2011, four of the Pants are Overrated strips were tributes to Calvin and Hobbes taking place about 26 years after the end of the original. Calvin is in his early 30s, he's married Suzy Derkins, and they have a little girl named Bacon who's about the same age they were in the original.

The original site no longer has the content, though a posting from February says it's under construction to get it back up and running.

In the meantime I've saved copies to the Imgur account I use for when I want to post an image that I can't directly link to.

So here they are, with a bonus treat: Guess who was nightmare fodder in 2011!:



---



---



---




TOON Bonus - The Compleat Bloom'n Hobbes

Berkeley Breathed has been continuing Bloom County on Facebook, allowing a much slower pace than syndication, and has recently finished up a storyline featuring other old friends.





















































Added for your C&H pleasure, TOON Bonus 2 - Hobbes And Bacon



Let's talk about how talk radio shaped Republican politicians... - Beau of the 5th column

The original links are gone. Jeez, I had to dig to find copies...

...although most of that was figuring out the right search terms to get the one(s, plural) you're thinking of. Quite a few other people have made attempts, including attempts to continue these ones.

They appeared in an online comic strip by Dan and Tom Heyerman called Pants are Overrated in 2011. Between May and October 2011, four of the Pants are Overrated strips were tributes to Calvin and Hobbes taking place about 26 years after the end of the original. Calvin is in his early 30s, he's married Suzy Derkins, and they have a little girl named Bacon who's about the same age they were in the original.

The original site no longer has the content, though a posting from February says it's under construction to get it back up and running.

In the meantime I've saved copies to the Imgur account I use for when I want to post an image that I can't directly link to.

So here they are, with a bonus treat: Guess who was nightmare fodder in 2011!:



---



---



---




TOON Bonus - Bloom'n Hobbes

As of July 31, 2021, the crossover story arc is complete. Be sure to catch The Compleat Bloom'n Hobbes here.




Berkeley Breathed has been continuing Bloom County on Facebook, allowing a much slower pace than syndication, and has recently visited another old friend.
























We do need more brackets that stretch higher up the income scale, though the details...

...should be open for debate. The main goal is reversing what the 80s ushered in, that the highest virtue was shooting money skyward -- as much as possible, as fast as possible, as high as possible. Even with all the loopholes that let the well-off and wealthy avoid paying the top rates, the old high-level brackets put a damper in that upward geyser (and many of the loopholes still helped push money outward rather than upward). It was the 80s tax cuts and other policies that removed that damper and eliminated drawbacks to grabbing for every last dollar.

Back during the centennial of the Income Tax in 2013, the Tax Foundation put out a spreadsheet of historical tax rates (in both original and inflation-adjusted terms). Since "Is $250K/year 'rich'?" was still making the rounds in tax discussions (or blather, from some sources) and I know things had been very different pre-Reagan, I crunched some numbers and wound up focusing on the number and spread of brackets rather than the rates themselves.

For instance, here's the distribution of brackets from 1942 to 2013 (using 'married couple filing jointly' inflation-adjusted data):



I used 1942 as a start because in inflation-adjusted numbers spiked so far upward before then (and even more just before the Roosevelt administration but quickly came back to a less-astronomical top bracket boundary) that I would have needed to build a "skip" in the graph, and my Excel skills weren't up to that.

The compression of rates as you move forward in time is how inflation shows up in the inflation-adjusted numbers, and you can see when various tax reform efforts changed things. It wasn't until the mid-80s that tax brackets indexed to inflation and stayed relatively steady across years.

But look how far up the income spectrum those past brackets ran. To pick one year, "good old 1955" as the movie said, there were 24 brackets. Adjusted for inflation, 16 of them affected taxable income over $250K. Two thirds of all the brackets. 11 of those affected income over the equivalent of $500K. About 45% of the brackets. The top rate (91% that year) kicked in for taxable income over the equivalent of about $3.3 million.

Here's the yearly breakdown for total brackets vs number affecting inflation-adjusted income over $250K and $500K:


The reason I think raising awareness of these bracket spreads rather than the raw rates is because how it changes the framing and terms of the debate. Instead of going hammer and tongs over particular thresholds like $250K or $400K, it points up that there is a lot more room to maneuver. Historical bracket levels were wiped out in the 80s and have never returned. They should, even if the actual rates are open to debate.
Go to Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 34 Next »