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JHB

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Current location: Somewhere in the NYC metropolitan statistical area
Member since: 2001
Number of posts: 33,247

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He passed in 2001, and he did take a swipe at Trump

This is from 1999, when Trump was dabbling with a candidacy in Ross Perot's Reform Party.



According to editorial cartoonist Herb Block, better known as Herblock, the stupidest tea party was when, in October 1999, presidential candidate Patrick Buchanan switched from the Republican Party to the Reform Party, creating divisiveness within the emerging third party as his political platform differed markedly from that of founder Ross Perot. In the meantime, real estate magnate Donald Trump had formally established his Reform Party candidacy. Trump was favored as the “Stop Buchanan” candidate, but in February 2000, he withdrew from the race. In August 2000, Patrick Buchanan accepted the presidential nomination from one wing of a decidedly split Reform Party. For Herb Block, the situation evoked one of Sir John Tenniel’s famous illustrations for Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.”

https://downtherabbitholemag.wordpress.com/2015/04/24/political-cartoons/

If Trump tries to stay in the WH past noon 1/20, there's a simple way to get him to leave quietly...

Remember, after noon, WH workers answer to the incoming administration. No need for dragging him out or anything.

Have the kitchen start making mashed potatoes. Lots and lots of mashed potatoes. Put in carry-out orders to restaurants to add capacity.

Scrounge up every medium-sized bowl in the WH inventory that isn't valuable on its own. Start a drive a week or two beforehand to borrow/rent bowls from DC residents and restaurants.

Show him a sea of bowls of mashed potatoes that will be dumped on his head until he leaves. Dozens, hundreds of them.

If he thinks it's a bluff, start following through. Dump a bowl on his head and everybody laugh. Then dump another bowl and repeat. And repeat. And repeat.

He'll leave. Either when faced with it, or after the first with the second looming, and all those others behind it. Meekly, and dodging attention as hard as he can manage.

Even better if they can dredge up someone who can do a passable Fred Trump impression.

This very topic came up back in May. I expanded on it at the time...

...because I was a comics nerd back when it came out in 1984 (still have it in a box somewhere). It was one of the things that inspired me to not just give up our symbols to them. There can be plenty of problems, but there is good stuff near and dear to peoples' hearts, so don't let the bastards take them and use them as their toys.

https://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1002&pid=13516300

That third panel is from 1984's What If #44, which echos so much today
The premise was "What If Captain America were revived today?" ("today" being 1984).

It has two different Caps being revived: First, the 1950's replacement Cap, who's a McCarthyite Bircher-in-all-but-name, who'd been created to get back that ol' WW2-Cap "living symbol of patriotism" spirit during the crusade against the commies. At some point in the '50s he became inconvenient and was put in some sort of suspended animation. Some time in the 70s he was released by a "patriotic citizen", who was a janitor at the secret facility where he was being kept on ice. Once again posing as WW2 Cap, he becomes a magnet for RW politicians and other zealots.

Including one who wants to put severe restrictions on immigrants, get tough with unruly minorities, and reinvigorate "the real America". With fake-Cap's backing he wins in a landslide. Fake-Cap endorses militias, the "Sentinels of Liberty", to confront protesters. At one such protest, fake-Cap's higher-level backers have a sniper shoot him so it can be blamed on the protesters and justify a crackdown, Reichstag-Fire-style.

Fake-Cap survived (believing it was the protesters who shot him), and went on to help his backers consolidate power under -- I kid you not -- the America First Party. The Sentinels of Liberty are elevated to practically an internal occupation army. They build walls to seal off minorities from the rest of the country, most notable the Harlem Wall. An Emergency Information Freedoms Act is passed to restrict the press. To maintain the appearance of following the 1st Amendment, some dissent (within limits) is allowed. One such dissident is the New York Daily Bugle's cantankerous and idiosyncratic editor/publisher, J. Jonah Jameson.

This is the environment in which WW2 Cap, Steve Rogers, is found in the ice and revived by a submarine crew (submarine duty being the main "See? We're not discriminating. We accept the good ones." job for minorities and Jews in the Navy).

The old-timer sub skipper is able to identify this Cap as the real one, and when they get back to port he sneaks Cap to the Resistance, led by Jameson, Nick Fury, Sam Wilson (who's not The Falcon here, but instead leads "the Black Cadres," intentionally modeled after the Black Panther Party), and Spider-Man.

I give the above rundown to set the stage for the couple of pages below. Clipping panels here and there don't do them justice.

The Resistance strikes back at the America First Party's first national convention in Madison Square Garden. With all the restrictions, its leader is a veritable shoe-in to win the election, and once he's in place he'll consolidate further and make himself the king of America.

First, however, the Resistance upstages the festivities...



Over the next several pages Cap & fake-Cap fight, and other Resistance members take out the Sentinels in the room and keep the TV cameras running. Being the real deal, Cap beats the fake. The crowd reacts, and Cap says his piece.





End scene.

The resolution is wildly simplistic, sure, but they had to wrap it up on a high note.

"TV" is a Secret Service code word...

From what I've seen, they'll enjoy finally having some time to breathe

Attributed to Dan Perkins (a.k.a. Tom Tomorrow): cartooning in the age of Trump has been like "trying to take a sip from a fire hose open full blast."




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