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Judi Lynn

Judi Lynn's Journal
Judi Lynn's Journal
November 2, 2022

Bolivia Urges Brazil To Extradite Former Minister Of Defence For Possibly Plotting To Assassinate Pr

Bolivia Urges Brazil To Extradite Former Minister Of Defence For Possibly Plotting To Assassinate President Luis Arce

By Manuel Rueda?|?AP
November 1, 2022 at 7:50 p.m. EDT

Bolivia has requested the extradition of former Minister of Defense, Luis Fernando Lopez Julio, from Brazil for his involvement in the attempted assassination of President Luis Arce. Lopez was said to have fled to Brazil in 2020 around the same time as Arce’s inauguration after his plot had failed.

According to Kawsachunn News, Interior Minister, Eduardo Del Castillo said that Bolivia had filed a complaint to Brazil a few months back, which has now gained much attention when the details of the complaint were expanded by his ministry to include the assassination plot. Castillo continued that the end goal of the complaint was the extradition of Lopez from Brazil so that Bolivian justice may be rendered.

Del Castillo revealed further details of the assassination attempt on Monday citing that Lopez had contracted third parties to bring mercenaries and paramilitaries into Bolivia to kill Arce, who was running for candidacy at the time. The goal was to prevent Arce from being sworn in if he were to win the election. Information provided by The Intercept said Lopez had poured in hundreds of mercenaries from the United States to see his plan fulfilled.

In a leaked recording, a person who was identified as Lopez said he was working to “avoid the annihilation of my country”. He continued calling on the armed forces as well as the Bolivian people to “rise up” and prevent the accession of the Arce administration. Disagreement between ministers and divisions within the armed forces was strained further by Arce’s convincing electoral victory on Oct 18, 2020. The plot was never executed and several officials including Lopez either fled the country or were arrested by authorities on charges of corruption and alleged involvement in a coup in 2019.

The Intercept also said one of the hired group mercenaries that entered Bolivia had lodged at a hotel nearby government offices. The group was later arrested in Haiti for another assassination plot that saw the death of former President Jovenel Moise.

More:
https://www.latintimes.com/bolivia-urges-brazil-extradite-former-minister-defence-possibly-plotting-assassinate-531454



Jeanine Áñez, coup-installed president, and Luis Fernando López Julio



Luis Fernando Lopez Julio and illegitimate
president, backed by Trump, Jeanine Áñez.

Luis Fernando López Julio (born 15 October 1964) is a Bolivian businessman, retired military officer, and politician who served as minister of defense from 2019 to 2020. Appointed in the tail end of the 2019 political crisis, López, along with Minister of Government Arturo Murillo, quickly became characterized as the "strong men" of the Jeanine Áñez administration and were implicated in the deadly events at Senkata and Sacaba. López was called to hearings by the Plurinational Legislative Assembly but failed to present himself three consecutive times, ultimately resulting in his censure by the legislature. As per the terms of the Constitution, he was dismissed as minister but, exploiting a loophole in the document's text, he was reappointed just a day later. Soon after, reports revealed his participation in the tear gas case, which accused the ministries of government and defense of irregularly purchasing non-lethal weapons at inflated prices.

After the 2020 general election, López entered contact with American ex-army soldiers, seeking to facilitate the transport of mercenaries and paramilitaries to Bolivia in order to launch a preemptive coup d'état that would prevent President-elect Luis Arce from coming to office. After that endeavor proved unfruitful, he, along with Murillo, fled the country just three days prior to Arce's inauguration. He remains in hiding in Brazil as the Bolivian government seeks his extradition for crimes of breach of duties, among others.

. . .

Coup d'état plot
On 17 June 2021, journalists from The Intercept broke the story that in the few weeks after Luis Arce's victory in the 2020 general election López had attempted to facilitate a coup d'état to prevent his assumption to office. Leaked phone recordings and emails revealed that López had been in contact with Joe Pereira, a former civilian administrator with the U.S. Army. In the audio logs, López indicated that "military high command is already in preliminary talks" and promised that "the commander of the armed forces [Sergio Orellana] is working on all of this" and that "we have a united armed forces". López continued by stating that he was "focused on avoiding the annihilation of my country".[38] Among the concerns within the armed forces were fears that the Movement for Socialism intended to replace them with civilian militias along Venezuelan lines. During his ministerial administration, López had echoed such concerns, stating in January 2020 that "[Evo Morales] indicates that there is a serious intention to eliminate the Armed Forces and the Police so that there is a foreign militia in our country".[39] Bolivian political scientist Eduardo Gamarra also suggested that the armed forces "were rightly concerned there was going to be a major purge. The MAS was going to be furious".[38]

In different call logs, Pereira assured that he could "get up to 10,000 men with no problem", outlining a plan to pick up personnel in Homestead Air Reserve Base in Miami using Bolivian-owned C-130s, of which the Ministry of Defense had one. The mercenaries would be placed under shell contracts to disguise the purpose of their presence. Pereira's claims were later characterized as exaggerated with his assurance of 10,000 men being called "absurd". The coup plot ultimately never came to fruition, largely due to disagreements between López and Murillo, whose capacity as minister of government gave him singular control of police.[38]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Fernando_L%C3%B3pez

~ ~ ~

Añez confesses that Camacho appointed Fernando López as Minister of Defense
published June 9, 2021

By Carlos Corz / LA RAZON.- In her tax statement, former president Jeanine Áñez confirmed that the excivic and governor of Santa Cruz, Luis Fernando Camacho, suggested Fernando López for Minister of Defense and that the decrees that made the purchase of gases viable tear gas were approved on the fast track with the participation of the entire cabinet.

Áñez testified on Monday before the Prosecutor's Office for the tear gas case, whose main defendants are former ministers López and the Government Arturo Murillo. Murillo is detained in the United States, precisely, for the complaint of overpricing in the purchase of non-lethal material.

In his statement, he explained that he named Murillo because he was part of his circle of fellow legislators and López at the suggestion of Camacho, who in November 2019 led the protests and civic mobilizations that, along with other events, led to the resignation of former President Evo Morales.

. . .

Camacho himself revealed in 2019 that he put López in the Áñez cabinet so that he fulfills the commitments that his father, Luis, made with the military so that they do not come out in defense of the Morales government.

More:
https://plurinacional.info/2021/06/09/anez-confiesa-que-camacho-puso-de-ministro-de-defensa-a-fernando-lopez/

~ ~ ~



















~ ~ ~



Google translation:



Despite the clear protagonism that women's movements are generating in the Latin American region, or as a kind of mockery of fate to this social expression, the most virulent opposition to the government of Evo Morales in Bolivia emerges embodied in a man they call " The male". By Nodal

Who is Luis Fernando Camacho, the man who leads the coup in Bolivia

The story of the "Macho"

He was born and raised in Santa Cruz, one of the richest and most powerful areas of Bolivia and the department in which the majority of the country's white population of European descent historically lives. After graduating as a lawyer from the Private University of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, he completed postgraduate studies at the University of Barcelona where he completed a master's degree in Financial and Tax Law.

His activism began when he was 23 years old as vice president of the Unión Juvenil Cruceñista civic organization , which although it defines itself as "civic" was described by the International Federation for Human Rights as "a kind of paramilitary group" that carries out acts of racism and discrimination. against indigenous inhabitants and institutions of the area.

Already in 2015, he joined the Pro Santa Cruz Civic Committee -where his father was president between 1981 and 1983-, first as second vice president and then as first vice president. Since February 2019, Luis Fernando Camacho has chaired this organization that brings together business, neighborhood and labor entities in the region where most of the opposition to the transformation process led by Evo Morales since he became president in 2006 meets. In fact, He earned the nickname “macho” precisely because of the “courage” with which he leads the campaign against Morales, whom he accuses of being a “tyrant” and a “dictator”, although throughout his public life he demonstrated on several occasions that Morales nickname of "dictator" also suits him for his macho behavior and his patriarchal violence that his followers reply.

Along with his public life, Camacho is a university professor and businessman, and together with his family he is part of the Grupo Empresarial de Inversiones Nacional Vida SA The companies belonging to this corporation operate in the insurance, gas and services sectors. There are versions that indicate that one of the main causes of his staunch opposition to the Morales government is due to debts and million-dollar losses related to the gas business in Santa Cruz .

On the other hand, there are local media that link him to the Panama Papers as an intermediary, from the creation of three companies (Medis Overseas Corp., Navi International Holding and Positive Real Estates) to "help people and companies hide their fortunes in offshore entities, launder money and establish tax evasion schemes”.

More:
https://www.anred.org/2019/11/10/quien-es-luis-fernando-camacho-el-hombre-que-encabeza-el-golpe-de-estado-en-bolivia/

November 2, 2022

How Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders Helped Lula Win

A democratic America took the air out of the Brazilian far right.

BY RYAN COOPER NOVEMBER 1, 2022



ROBERTO CASIMIRO/FOTOARENA/SIPA USA VIA AP IMAGES

The president-elect of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, makes a statement to the press in São Paulo, Brazil, on October 30, 2022, after the counting of votes.


In the runoff election for the presidency of Brazil on Sunday, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva narrowly defeated the far-right incumbent Jair Bolsonaro, by 51 to 49 percent. It’s an enormous victory and incredible comeback for Lula, his staff, and the thousands of ordinary Brazilians who worked themselves to the bone on the campaign.

But there is an international element as well. If Joe Biden had not won the U.S. election in 2020, it’s highly likely that Lula would not have been able to claim victory. Bolsonaro would have successfully rigged the vote, or simply attempted a putsch—and a second-term Donald Trump would have helped him do it. The danger of Bolsonaro and his movement remains, but they have suffered a major setback.

Here’s why. First, there is the recent context. Clearly inspired by Trump and the poisonous miasma of American right-wing media, Bolsonaro had for years spread conspiratorial insanity about Brazil’s electoral machinery (which in reality is famously efficient and reliable). This is becoming a classic political tactic of the extreme right around the world: spread disinformation about voting as preparation to discredit the election and seize power by force or fraud should you lose.

In July 2021, Biden’s pick for CIA director, William Burns—unusually, a career diplomat with decades of experience in the State Department—met with Bolsonaro face-to-face, along with his top staff, and told them to knock it off. Reuters reported: “Burns was making it clear that elections were not an issue that they should mess with,” and that this was widely understood to be a message carried from the White House.

More:
https://prospect.org/world/how-joe-biden-and-bernie-sanders-helped-lula-win/

November 2, 2022

How Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders Helped Lula Win


A democratic America took the air out of the Brazilian far right.

BY RYAN COOPER NOVEMBER 1, 2022



ROBERTO CASIMIRO/FOTOARENA/SIPA USA VIA AP IMAGES

The president-elect of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, makes a statement to the press in São Paulo, Brazil, on October 30, 2022, after the counting of votes.


In the runoff election for the presidency of Brazil on Sunday, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva narrowly defeated the far-right incumbent Jair Bolsonaro, by 51 to 49 percent. It’s an enormous victory and incredible comeback for Lula, his staff, and the thousands of ordinary Brazilians who worked themselves to the bone on the campaign.

But there is an international element as well. If Joe Biden had not won the U.S. election in 2020, it’s highly likely that Lula would not have been able to claim victory. Bolsonaro would have successfully rigged the vote, or simply attempted a putsch—and a second-term Donald Trump would have helped him do it. The danger of Bolsonaro and his movement remains, but they have suffered a major setback.

Here’s why. First, there is the recent context. Clearly inspired by Trump and the poisonous miasma of American right-wing media, Bolsonaro had for years spread conspiratorial insanity about Brazil’s electoral machinery (which in reality is famously efficient and reliable). This is becoming a classic political tactic of the extreme right around the world: spread disinformation about voting as preparation to discredit the election and seize power by force or fraud should you lose.

In July 2021, Biden’s pick for CIA director, William Burns—unusually, a career diplomat with decades of experience in the State Department—met with Bolsonaro face-to-face, along with his top staff, and told them to knock it off. Reuters reported: “Burns was making it clear that elections were not an issue that they should mess with,” and that this was widely understood to be a message carried from the White House.

More:
https://prospect.org/world/how-joe-biden-and-bernie-sanders-helped-lula-win/
November 1, 2022

TRADE TIFF BREWING BETWEEN U.S. AND MEXICO OVER BAN ON GMO CORN

Nov. 1, 2022

The Scoop reports:

Mexico has confirmed that the country does not plan to amend its ban on imports of GMO that is set to start in 2024. Mexico's Deputy Ag Minister says the country is on track to cut is imports of U.S. yellow corn by half through increased domestic production. Mexico is a top customer for U.S. corn, accounting for 20 to 25% of U.S. corn exports annually. So, this is a huge issue.

Mexico is back tracking on their reassurances made a year ago that they would not limit imports of GMO corn from the U.S. Instead, they say they'll make direct deals with farmers in the U.S, Argentina and Brazil who produce non-GMO corn to supply their need outside of domestic production. However, market experts say this is simply not doable.

Rich Nelson, with Allendale, "We've heard this story for the past two years. We all understand from the U.S. grain market perspective we simply don't think it's going to be realistic. Mexico gets about 90 to 92% of its corn from the U.S., 15 million ton annually and it our GMO corn that's about 92% of our product."

In fact, 92% of the world corn supply is GMO. So, Nelson says South America will have difficulty guaranteeing that volume of non-GMO product. He says, "Now you can certainly argue that Brazil is going to be much cheaper than us right now to cargo in but the question is do they have the supply of non-GMO corn that can be verified?"

More:
https://www.agrimarketing.com/s/142987

~ ~ ~

Mexican farmer's daughter: NAFTA destroyed us
by Shasta Darlington and Patrick Gillespie @CNNMoney
February 9, 2017: 12:19 PM ET

If you ask President Donald Trump, Mexico won the lottery almost 25 years ago when it signed NAFTA, the free trade deal with the United States and Canada.
"It has been a one-sided deal from the beginning of NAFTA with massive numbers of jobs and companies lost," Trump tweeted on Jan. 26.

But if you ask Griselda Mendoza, the deal nearly destroyed her family and her community of corn farmers in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. "Before NAFTA, everybody here grew corn. People didn't make much money, but nobody went hungry," says Mendoza, 23, sharing common lore from her region. She was born just after NAFTA was signed.

As cheap American corn came pouring in from the border, it had a devastating effect on her family. Her father, Benancio Mendoza, couldn't compete and make a living wage selling corn. He had to give up and move to the United States looking for a job. He took up a job as a cook in Tennessee, saving up money to send home so his kids could attend school.

"He went north looking for a job and I didn't see him again for 18 years," says Mendoza, who now works as a secretary for the local government.

While NAFTA did boost Mexico's manufacturing industry, it gutted many farming towns -- especially mom and pop corn farmers like Benancio's. Mexico lost over 900,000 farming jobs in the first decade of NAFTA, according to data from the United States Department of Agriculture.

More:
https://money.cnn.com/2017/02/09/news/economy/nafta-farming-mexico-us-corn-jobs/index.html

~ ~ ~

Corn subsidies at root of U.S.-Mexico immigration problems
BY ANTHONY B. BRADLEY, PHD • FEBRUARY 29, 2012

America’s immigration debate will never be adequately addressed until we think clearly about the economic incentives that encourage Mexican citizens to risk their lives to cross the border. In fact, if we care about human dignity, we must think comprehensively about the conditions for human flourishing so that the effective policies promote the common good. Sadly, U.S. government farm subsidies create the conditions for the oppression and poor health care of Mexican migrant workers in ways that make those subsidies nothing less than immoral.

Dr. Seth M. Holmes, a professor of Health and Social Behavior at the University of California-Berkeley, identified the source of the problem in his watershed 2006 paper, “An Ethnographic Study of the Social Context of Migrant Health in the United States.” In the study we learn that 95 percent of agricultural workers in the United States were born in Mexico and 52 percent are undocumented. Most researchers agree that inequalities in the global market make up the primary driving force of labor migration patterns. Mexico’s current minimum wage is $4.60 (U.S.) a day. In contrast, the U.S. federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, while it is $7.65 in Arizona, $8 in California, $7.50 in New Mexico, and $7.25 in Texas.

The 2003 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) deregulated all agricultural trade, except for corn and dairy products. The Mexican government complains that since NAFTA’s initial implementation in 1994, the United States has raised farm subsidies by 300 percent. As a result, Mexican corn farmers, who comprise the majority of the country’s agricultural sector, experienced drastic declines in the domestic price of their product. It should come as no surprise, then, that the United States began to experience an influx of Mexicans looking for employment in the latter half of the 1990s. Mexican farmers are now rightly protesting, because they cannot compete against prices that are artificially deflated for the sake of protecting Americans from necessary market corrections.

Holmes explains that migrant and seasonal farm workers suffer the poorest health status within the agriculture industry. For example, migrant workers have increased rates of many chronic conditions, such as HIV infection, malnutrition, anemia, hypertension, diabetes, anxiety, sterility, blood disorders, and abnormalities in liver and kidney function. This population has an increased incidence of acute sicknesses such as urinary tract and kidney infections, lung infections, heat stroke, anthrax, encephalitis, rabies, and tetanus. Tuberculosis prevalence is six times greater in this population than in the general United States population. Finally, Holmes reports, children of migrant farm workers show high rates of malnutrition, vision problems, dental problems, anemia, and excess blood lead levels.

More:
https://www.acton.org/pub/commentary/2012/02/29/corn-subsidies-root-us-mexico-immigration-problems

November 1, 2022

Brazil: Guaranteeing human rights must be a priority during transition period

October 31, 2022

Brazil’s presidential election ended on the night of Sunday, 30 October. According to the official information published by the Superior Electoral Court (TSE), the candidate Luiz Inácio da Silva was elected with 50.90% of the votes, against 49.10% for reelection of the candidate Jair Messias Bolsonaro. Blank and invalid votes represented 4.59% of the total.

Amnesty International warns that human rights must be a priority in the government transition period.

The election was marked by threats to the civil rights of the Brazilian people. There were serious complaints that the Federal Highway Police did not comply with TSE decisions and carried out at least 560 inspection operations against vehicles carrying out public transportation of voters on Sunday.

In addition to impediments to the free transit of citizens, the elections were marked by the dissemination of false news, statements by President Jair Bolsonaro and the actions of other public authorities that generated fears over the integrity of state institutions and respect for the outcome of the elections. Episodes of political violence were recurrent.

People denounced electoral harassment in their workplaces, members of religious communities denounced situations of coercion for demonstrating in defense of human rights, candidates and ordinary citizens suffered physical aggression or were killed for exercising their right to freedom of expression. Journalists were also assaulted and intimidated, and indigenous communities were deprived of their right to political participation.

More:
https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2022/10/brazil-guaranteeing-human-rights-priority-transition-period/

November 1, 2022

Brazilian Highway Police Allegedly Blocked Lula Voters During Eve Of Country's Presidential Election

Brazilian Highway Police Allegedly Blocked Lula Voters During Eve Of Country's Presidential Elections: Report
Elle Yap / Oct 31 2022, 11:27PM EDT

The Federal Highway Police of Brazil is being accused of blocking voters of the new President-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva on Sunday in the Northeast region of Brazil, as the Supreme Electoral Tribunal has asked for an explanation for their actions.

Many officials, activists, and voters have reportedly complained about the biased nature of the Federal Highway Police in areas that support Lula, with federal deputy Paulo Teixeira of the Workers’ Party claiming that the Federal Police and Highway Police are both interfering with the election, according to Brasil de Fato.

Illegal roadblocks were reportedly put up by the Highway Police in the Northeastern parts of Brazil, allegedly as a way of consolidating the vote to give Jair Bolsonaro a better chance of winning, as surveys before the election showed him lagging behind Lula in those territories, Reuters reported.

The Supreme Electoral Tribunal had previously ordered the Highway Police to take down the roadblocks before the elections.

More:
https://www.latintimes.com/brazilian-highway-police-allegedly-blocked-lula-voters-during-eve-countrys-531371

November 1, 2022

How Bolsonaro's defeat leads the rise of left in Latin America


4 min read . Updated: 01 Nov 2022, 11:18 AM IST
Sharmila Bhadoria

Months of campaigning and massive polarisation yielded no results for Jair Bolsonaro, as he lost by a thin margin from the veteran leftist, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in Brazil's Presidential elections on Sunday.

Winner Lula da Silva prevailed over the incumbent President Jair Bolsonaro by winning 50.09 per cent of votes. With this, the drama that had entangled the Brazilian economy in a series of wrong decisions taken by Jair Bolsonaro has come to an end. Be it handling of COVID pandemic in the country or saving the Amazon, Jair Bolsonaro’s disastrous leadership left Brazilians fighting for their rights as basic as free speech.

The victory of Lula da Silva can help heal the Amazon
Jair Bolsonaro’s policy proved to be a major climate catastrophe. It was never only the environment, as his stance on the COVID pandemic, free speech, arms laws, and several other issues threw Brazil into a path of instability.

Talking about saving the Amazon rainforest, both the leaders, Jair Bolsonaro and Lula da Silva, claimed to reduce deforestation during their tenure. A close look at the Prodes report, shows that its results align with Jair Bolsonaro’s claim that deforestation was at its lowest during his tenure. However, the report also sheds light upon Lula da Silva’s efforts, which brought down deforestation to a historically low level by the time he left office in 2010. On contrary, the rate of deforestation increased annually under Jair Bolsonaro’s leadership.

More:
https://www.livemint.com/news/world/how-bolsonaro-s-defeat-leads-the-rise-of-left-in-latin-america-11667204550448.html
October 31, 2022

Lula vowed to safeguard the Amazon. After Bolsonaro, it won't be easy.

By Paulina Villegas and Sarah Kaplan
October 31, 2022 at 6:53 p.m. EDT



An area of Amazon forest is cut down on private rural property in Brazil's Acre state in July. (Rafael Vilela for The Washington Post)


BRASILIA — When Luis Inácio Lula da Silva was elected president of Brazil on Sunday, Gustavo Conde felt a sense of relief — for himself and everyone.
“It feels like we can breathe again,” the 23-year-old cook said in downtown Brasilia. “And so will the planet.”

If Lula keeps his campaign promises to safeguard the Amazon rainforest, analysts say, Brazil could have a major impact on the worldwide fight against climate change, after years of accelerating deforestation under President Jair Bolsonaro. Scientists warn that the lungs of the planet, vital to slowing global warming, are approaching a tipping point.

“Let’s fight for zero deforestation. The planet needs the Amazon alive,” Lula, who served two terms as president from 2003 to 2010, said in his victory address Sunday night. “A standing tree is worth more than tons of wood illegally harvested by those who think only of easy profit.”

During the bitterly fought campaign, Lula made the environment central to his pitch. Whereas Bolsonaro has promoted the development of the rainforest, Lula pledged to reverse many of his policies.
On Sunday, he vowed to restart the surveillance and monitoring of the rainforest, stop the invasion and burning of Indigenous lands, and fight other environmental crimes, including mining.



Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, Brazil's president-elect, poses for a supporter in São Paulo on Sunday after defeating President Jair Bolsonaro. (Tuane Fernandes/Bloomberg News)

More:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/10/31/lula-brazil-amazon/

October 30, 2022

Bolsonarist Federal Deputy Points A Gun at People in So Paulo


Carla Zambelli's gesture generated a commotion at the intersection of two main streets in the central area of the capital

Oct.30.2022 1:27PM

Bolsonarist federal deputy Carla Zambelli (PL-SP) pulled out a gun and pointed it at people this Saturday (29), in São Paulo.

The parliamentarian's attitude caused a commotion at the intersection of Joaquim Eugênio de Lima and Lorena avenues, in the central area of the capital. On her social media channels, she said she had been assaulted. A video shows a young man running towards a cafe while Zambelli and some men appear in pursuit. One of them yells "on the floor, scumbag".

The deputy enters the cafe pointing the gun at the boy. The man asks "you want to kill me for what?".

Zambelli says she shot into the air and chased a man after being harassed and assaulted. The deputy claims to have the license for possession of a federal weapon for personal and property defense. She says she was having lunch with her 14-year-old son when a group of people recognized her.

More:
https://www1.folha.uol.com.br/internacional/en/brazil/2022/10/carla-zambelli-points-a-gun-at-people-in-sao-paulo.shtml
October 30, 2022

Si Liberman: Cuba confession of an adventurous news junkie

SI LIBERMAN
OCT 29, 2022 11:00 PM



Our first first visit to Cuba 30-plus years ago could have landed us in hot water.

Ignoring the law barring American tourists from visiting the Communist island during the Cold War U.S. embargo, my wife and I sneaked into the country. We did it by following the risky path of other curious Americans who entered Cuba from another country with normal diplomatic relations with the Castro regime. In our case, it was via an Air Jamaica flight to Havana from Montego Bay.

Flouting the law in those days risked a hefty penalty: a fine of up to $250,000 and/​or 10 years in jail.

Arriving in Havana, my wife, Dorothy, a former Spanish teacher, urged the Jose Marti Airport customs officer not to stamp our passports to eliminate evidence of our presence.

More:
https://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/insight/2022/10/30/havana-history-missile-crisis-castro/stories/202210300030

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