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Blue_Tires

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Gender: Male
Hometown: VA
Home country: USA
Current location: VA
Member since: 2003 before July 6th
Number of posts: 55,363

About Me

I'm still living... Twitter: @glitchy_ashburn

Journal Archives

Snowden statue points to divide in US society: Is he hero or traitor?

A group of guerrilla artists' lofty, albeit controversial, goal of enshrining whistle-blower Edward Snowden among the ranks of American heroes was thwarted on Monday as New York City Department of Parks & Recreation officials promptly removed a bust of Mr. Snowden that the artists had installed atop a war memorial in Brooklyn, N.Y.

The group of artists, whose identities have not been confirmed, had fastened a custom-made bust of the former National Security Agency contractor to part of the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, a memorial to Revolutionary War soldiers. The parks department quickly covered the unsanctioned bust with a tarp and removed it shortly thereafter.

But while the dance of discord played out by the activist artists and park officials may have amused local spectators, it is representative of a divide within American society: the split between those who view Snowden as a national hero and those who believe he is a traitor.

According to a January 2014 poll by the Pew Research Center, while public opinion is divided over whether the Snowden leaks served the public interest, most young Americans are supportive of Snowden.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/USA-Update/2015/0407/Snowden-statue-points-to-divide-in-US-society-Is-he-hero-or-traitor-video

Crazy Things Glenn Beck Told Glenn Greenwald

Glenn Greenwald joined Glenn Beck on The Blaze radio hour this morning to discuss the security apparatus of the United States, as well as other topics of current interest, including the passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act in Indiana and the administration’s negotiations with Iran.

“Why does Indiana need to be gassed,” Beck asked, “and yet our president is trying to find common ground with Iran?”

“Let me break that down,” Greenwald replied. “First of all, our closest allies are the most repressive regimes on the planet, like Egypt and Saudi Arabia. So the idea that we’re at the table with a repressive regime is nothing new. Iran is a more enlightened progressive regime than our other allies.”

People make a big deal of ‘Death to America!’ chants,” Greenwald said. “But most people understand that rhetoric and actions aren’t the same. Iran can’t impose death on America. The United States took down Iranian government in 1979 — of course they’d be hostile to foreign invading powers.”

http://www.alternet.org/crazy-things-glenn-beck-told-glenn-greenwald

Birds of a feather, and all that....

Revealed: China’s Cyberwar ‘Cannon’

Computer security researchers have discovered a new “offensive device” being used by China’s powerful Internet censors that gives them the power to launch attacks on websites and inject malicious viruses on computers around the world.

The device is associated with China’s so-called Great Firewall, which blocks Internet searches in China for information the government deems controversial, such as from Chinese dissidents and government critics. But this new tool, which researchers dubbed the Great Cannon, actually can commandeer an unwitting person’s computer and marshal it into a network of machines used to flood websites with traffic and force them to shut down.

The cannon was used in such a denial-of-service attack on GreatFire.org, which helps Internet users circumvent Chinese censors, researchers at Citizen Lab, with the Munk School of Global Affairs at University of Toronto, and the University of California at Berkeley, said in a report released Friday. The Daily Beast obtained an advance copy of the document.

The Citizen Lab team concluded that it would be “trivial” to convert the Great Cannon from its censorship mission into a powerful system for injecting viruses, spyware, and other malicious code onto any foreign computer that communicates with a website in China, and that’s not protected with encryption.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/10/revealed-china-s-cyberwar-cannon.html?via=mobile&source=twitter

Isn't it strange how I find these stories on pretty much any news site not named "The Intercept?" Now why would that be??

A little Friday wisdom for DUers from George Carlin:

"So I say live and let live. That's my motto: Live and let live. Anyone who can't go along with that, take 'em outside and shoot the motherfucker. It's a simple philosophy, but it's always worked in our family...."

(From Carlin on Campus, 1984)

Edward Snowden’s impact

A lot of readers have seen John Oliver’s amusing interview of Edward Snowden. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s worth a watch. One of Oliver’s themes is that Snowden actually hasn’t had a major impact on American politics. Surveillance law is too complicated, Oliver suggests, and Snowden doesn’t have a simple message. But I think there are other reasons why Snowden hasn’t has a big impact on American public opinion — and also reasons that probably doesn’t matter for achieving Snowden’s goals. Here are some tentative thoughts on this big topic. I’ll hope to follow up later, with more firm views, in light of comments and responses.

I’ll begin with public opinion. Although the Snowden disclosures have impacted public opinion about government surveillance in some ways, they haven’t caused a major shift. Different polls are worded in different ways and suggest different things. But my overall sense is that public opinion has long been roughly evenly divided on U.S. government surveillance and continues to be roughly evenly divided post-Snowden. For example, in 2006, a poll on NSA surveillance suggested that 51% found NSA surveillance acceptable while 47% found it unacceptable. Shortly after the Snowden disclosures began, public opinion was equally divided about the Section 215 program. And just a few weeks ago, a Pew Research poll from last month found public opinion pretty evenly divided again:


Overall, 52% describe themselves as “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about government surveillance of Americans’ data and electronic communications, compared with 46% who describe themselves as “not very concerned” or “not at all concerned” about the surveillance.

The polling questions aren’t asking identical questions, so any conclusions have to be tentative. But on the whole, I don’t think the Snowden disclosures have caused a major shift in how the public thinks about national security surveillance.

The question is, why?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/04/09/edward-snowdens-impact/

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A pretty solid, well-reasoned analysis...Of course most DUers will ignore or denigrate it just because they see my name next to the thread title...

Edward Snowden’s impact

A lot of readers have seen John Oliver’s amusing interview of Edward Snowden. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s worth a watch. One of Oliver’s themes is that Snowden actually hasn’t had a major impact on American politics. Surveillance law is too complicated, Oliver suggests, and Snowden doesn’t have a simple message. But I think there are other reasons why Snowden hasn’t has a big impact on American public opinion — and also reasons that probably doesn’t matter for achieving Snowden’s goals. Here are some tentative thoughts on this big topic. I’ll hope to follow up later, with more firm views, in light of comments and responses.

I’ll begin with public opinion. Although the Snowden disclosures have impacted public opinion about government surveillance in some ways, they haven’t caused a major shift. Different polls are worded in different ways and suggest different things. But my overall sense is that public opinion has long been roughly evenly divided on U.S. government surveillance and continues to be roughly evenly divided post-Snowden. For example, in 2006, a poll on NSA surveillance suggested that 51% found NSA surveillance acceptable while 47% found it unacceptable. Shortly after the Snowden disclosures began, public opinion was equally divided about the Section 215 program. And just a few weeks ago, a Pew Research poll from last month found public opinion pretty evenly divided again:


Overall, 52% describe themselves as “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about government surveillance of Americans’ data and electronic communications, compared with 46% who describe themselves as “not very concerned” or “not at all concerned” about the surveillance.

The polling questions aren’t asking identical questions, so any conclusions have to be tentative. But on the whole, I don’t think the Snowden disclosures have caused a major shift in how the public thinks about national security surveillance.

The question is, why?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2015/04/09/edward-snowdens-impact/

The rush to flee Yemen's capital

8 April 2015 Last updated at 18:11 BST


Little is going in or out of Yemen's war-torn capital Sanaa these days, apart from Air India.

The airline has been running rescue missions for its own nationals and for foreigners from more than 26 countries.

The BBC's Orla Guerin flew with them from Djbiouti to Yemen - a 4 hour round trip.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-32216712

A truly dangerous meeting of minds

In the winter of 2003 jihadist turned MI5 spy Aimen Dean attended a lecture by Anwar al-Awlaki, a man he had never heard of but who would become an inspiration to Islamist extremists throughout the world. Also listening, and taking notes, were three of London's 7/7 bombers.

In a converted flat on the first floor of a building in the Black Country town of Dudley, about 30 men were gathered to hear a lecture by an American visitor who was building a reputation as an inspirational jihadist scholar.

In the audience were three men who would go on to launch suicide bomb attacks in London just over 18 months later, but also an undercover informant for the Security Service, MI5.

What happened behind the closed doors of this private meeting offers a rare insight into the battle between British Islamist extremism and the spies who fought against them. It was a battle which would erupt with bloodshed on the streets of London in the summer of 2005.


http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32065132

Just for the emoprogs still trying to pretend al-Awlaki was a good guy...You fucking know who you are...

How the U.S. thinks Russians hacked the White House

Washington (CNN)Russian hackers behind the damaging cyber intrusion of the State Department in recent months used that perch to penetrate sensitive parts of the White House computer system, according to U.S. officials briefed on the investigation.

While the White House has said the breach only affected an unclassified system, that description belies the seriousness of the intrusion. The hackers had access to sensitive information such as real-time non-public details of the president's schedule. While such information is not classified, it is still highly sensitive and prized by foreign intelligence agencies, U.S. officials say.

The White House in October said it noticed suspicious activity in the unclassified network that serves the executive office of the president. The system has been shut down periodically to allow for security upgrades.

The FBI, Secret Service and U.S. intelligence agencies are all involved in investigating the breach, which they consider among the most sophisticated attacks ever launched against U.S. government systems. ​The intrusion was routed through computers around the world, as hackers often do to hide their tracks, but investigators found tell-tale codes and other markers that they believe point to hackers working for the Russian government.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/07/politics/how-russians-hacked-the-wh/

(Snowden+Greenwald were unavailable for comment)

John Oliver just exposed a very big lie surrounding Edward Snowden

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden spoke with HBO's John Oliver in Moscow recently, and one exchange stood out amid the discussion of Hot Pockets and nude photos.

"How many of those documents have you actually read?" Oliver asked, referring to the estimated 200,000 NSA documents Snowden stole and turned over to journalists in Hong Kong.

"I have evaluated all of the documents in the archive," Snowden replied.

"You've read every single one?"

"Well, I do understand what I turned over."

http://www.businessinsider.com/snowden-and-john-oliver-2015-4
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