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Duncan Grant

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Gender: Do not display
Hometown: Northern California
Member since: 2003 before July 6th
Number of posts: 7,991

Journal Archives

The Timothy McVeigh contingent of gun-humping political "victims".

Summation: A group of anti-social white supremacists and anti-semites who know themselves to be constitutional scholars and the true patriots of liberty and freedom. With cognitive abilities so underdeveloped they cannot articulate coherent thought or comparative analysis. Spitefully imbecilic and contemptibly stupid.

Consequently: Guns. Lots and lots of guns.

Requires a caption for $500, Alex. (It's the Daily Double!)

Morality test for photographers

This takes less than one minute and is incredibly accurate...well worth the little bit of effort.

This test has only one question, but it's a very important one. By giving an honest answer you will discover where you stand morally.

THE SITUATION:

You are in Miami with chaos all around you caused by a hurricane. There is a flood of biblical proportions. You are a photojournalist working for a major newspaper and you're caught in the middle of this epic disaster. You're trying to shoot career-making photos. There are houses and people swirling around you, some disappearing under the water.

THE TEST:

Suddenly you see a man in the water. He is fighting for his life trying not to be taken down with the debris. You move closer. Somehow the man looks like...good heavens - it's Donald Trump! At the same time you notice that the raging waters are about to take him under forever.

YOU HAVE TWO OPTIONS:

You can save the life of President Trump OR you can shoot a dramatic Pulitzer Prize winning photo, documenting the last minutes of one of the world's most powerful men.

THE QUESTION:

Would you

A) select high contrast colour film,

OR

B) go with the classic simplicity of black and white?

How does coronavirus kill? Clinicians trace a ferocious rampage through the body, from brain to toes

Source: Science Magazine/News

How does coronavirus kill? Clinicians trace a ferocious rampage through the body, from brain to toes

What follows is a snapshot of the fast-evolving understanding of how the virus attacks cells around the body, especially in the roughly 5% of patients who become critically ill. Despite the more than 1000 papers now spilling into journals and onto preprint servers every week, a clear picture is elusive, as the virus acts like no microbe humanity has ever seen. Without larger, prospective controlled studies that are only now being launched, scientists must pull information from small studies and case reports, often published at warp speed and not yet peer reviewed. “We need to keep a very open mind as this phenomenon goes forward,” says Nancy Reau, a liver transplant physician who has been treating COVID-19 patients at Rush University Medical Center. “We are still learning.”

The infection begins
When an infected person expels virus-laden droplets and someone else inhales them, the novel coronavirus, called SARS-CoV-2, enters the nose and throat. It finds a welcome home in the lining of the nose, according to a preprint from scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and elsewhere. They found that cells there are rich in a cell-surface receptor called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Throughout the body, the presence of ACE2, which normally helps regulate blood pressure, marks tissues vulnerable to infection, because the virus requires that receptor to enter a cell. Once inside, the virus hijacks the cell’s machinery, making myriad copies of itself and invading new cells...

Buffeting the brain
Another striking set of symptoms in COVID-19 patients centers on the brain and central nervous system. Frontera says neurologists are needed to assess 5% to 10% of coronavirus patients at her hospital. But she says that “is probably a gross underestimate” of the number whose brains are struggling, especially because many are sedated and on ventilators...

Reaching the gut
In early March, a 71-year-old Michigan woman returned from a Nile River cruise with bloody diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Initially doctors suspected she had a common stomach bug, such as Salmonella. But after she developed a cough, doctors took a nasal swab and found her positive for the novel coronavirus. A stool sample positive for viral RNA, as well as signs of colon injury seen in an endoscopy, pointed to a gastrointestinal (GI) infection with the coronavirus, according to a paper posted online in The American Journal of Gastroenterology (AJG).
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