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beam me up scottie

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Hometown: The Green Mountain State
Current location: Red state in the bible belt
Member since: Sun Oct 10, 2004, 08:05 PM
Number of posts: 57,349

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An Anti-Theistís Interpretation Of The Bibleís Opinion On Same-Sex Marriage

An Anti-Theistís Interpretation Of The Bibleís Opinion On Same-Sex Marriage
April 29, 2015 by Peter Mosley

Hereís my interpretation of the Bibleís opinion on Same-Sex marriage:

Anything derogatory it says about same-sex marriage is nothing more than prejudice against gay individuals by primitive tribes.

...

So, what Iíd like you to do is throw your Bible away. Because, honestly, this is ridiculous. Why the heck would you hang on to that ancient rulebook crafted by bigots? Itís time to look past that to people who exist and who love each other.

I guess thatís why Iím an anti-theist. I see progressives and conservatives and fatheists arguing over what God supposedly ďREALLYĒ said, and Iím standing here like ó can we move pass this? Can we move past trying to get to the ďtrueĒ meaning of texts and start looking at, like, the flesh and blood people right in front of us?

...

I mean, this is absurd. Iím tired of being trapped in a stone age when there are people in the current age who want to show their love for each other.

Letís quit making this so damn complicated. Two people love each other. They want to get married. Awesome.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/barrierbreaker/an-anti-theists-interpretation-of-the-bibles-opinion-on-same-sex-marriage/




Leave it to an anti-theist to point out the obvious: "when youíre trying to engineer an egalitarian society, messing with nonexistent variables doesnít seem all that helpful."



Posted by beam me up scottie | Fri May 1, 2015, 06:11 PM (18 replies)

Carl Sagan Appreciation Thread

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[font color=black size=3 face=Georgia]"Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."


-- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot, 1994[/font]


November 9, 1934 - December 20, 1996




Please post your favourite quotes and pictures.


Posted by beam me up scottie | Thu Apr 2, 2015, 10:56 PM (29 replies)
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