HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » FogerRox » Journal
Page: 1

FogerRox

Profile Information

Member since: Tue Nov 30, 2004, 06:22 PM
Number of posts: 13,211

Journal Archives

23 million

A return to New Deal infrastructure spending: 6% of GDP-900 billion, would create about 23 million jobs (22.5).

26 million under employed or unemployed, U6 is at 21.5 million. Fudge it: 23 million.

The CBO scoring of the 75 yr SS shortfall is .6% of GDP, which would equal 23 million jobs at 31.5k producing 89.3 billion in FICA. 15 trillion dollar economy, .6% is 90 billion.

Chained CPI is stealth income tax increase #noChainedCPI #noSScuts #SSD please sign petition

Most understand that the Chained CPI will hurt seniors, especially woman who earned less during their working days and live a little longer than their spouses while facing their last years living alone.



But what may not be well known is that Chained CPI would be used not just for calculating Social Security and Veterans Benefits..... If the Government adopts Chained CPI for adjusting Income Tax Brackets, & wages grow more than the Chained CPI, your income rises faster than the Income tax brackets would. Over time many families would be bumped into the next income tax bracket. Currently the Income Tax Brackets are adjusted to CPI-U.

According to Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation, if individual income taxes were indexed to the Chained CPI starting in January 2013, by 2021, 69 percent of the gains in revenue would come from taxpayers with incomes below $100,000, while those in the highest income brackets would barely be affected. For example, workers with incomes between $10,000 and $20,000 would experience an increased tax burden of 14.5 percent, while those with incomes over $1,000,000 would just see an increase of 0.1 percent.
Source:http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/cpi-2012-12.pdf
http://democrats.waysandmeans.house.gov/sites/democrats.waysandmeans.house.gov/files/media/pdf/112/6-29ResponseChainedCPI.pdf



Seniors dont have the same buying patterns as working wage earners and clerical workers, which is what CPI-W is tracking. CPI-W can't possibly represent Seniors buying habits.

Please sign and share the White House Petition telling President Obama no Social Security cuts will be tolerated.

Seniors spend more on housing and medical care than people still in the workforce who maybe decades younger and in the prime of their health. Substituting Medical care may be impossible in some situations, and I can't imagine how one can substitute a Nursing Home. 2 out of 5 seniors rely on Social Security as 90% of their retirement income, while in 2012 the average Social Security benefit for those 65 and older was less than $15,000.

In addition, there are fewer opportunities for substitution in these areas of consumption. Also, because the elderly are a less mobile population, they may find it more difficult to change their consumption patterns. If accuracy is the main concern to be addressed by altering the Social Security cost of living adjustment, then the BLS could construct a full elderly index that more accurately tracks the consumption patterns of the elderly. There is no basis for assuming that a Chained CPI more accurately measures the rate of inflation experienced by the elderly than the current measure,however there is no doubt that it will lead to a reduction in benefits.

Center For Economic And Policy Research








The best thing for Social Security is a growing economy, creating jobs and raising the minimum wage regularly can go a long way to seeing Social Security thru to 2045 when 50% of Boomers born in 1964 will be dead. Once The Social Security Trust Fund gets past this point, assets will grow slowly and by 2062 assets will grow quickly.



As you can see once the Boomers are dead, the number of workers supporting a retiree will vastly improve.






Please sign and share the White House Petition telling President Obama no Social Security cuts will be tolerated.

Go to Page: 1