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mnhtnbb

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Gender: Female
Hometown: NYC
Home country: USA
Current location: Raleigh, NC
Member since: Sat May 7, 2005, 11:13 PM
Number of posts: 25,625

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Architects of the political regression in NC called out in opinion piece

This opinion piece, by a Chancellor Emeritus of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington ran in today's edition
of the Raleigh News & Observer. It's an excellent summary of the political history of the state.

For Tar Heel time, set your clock back 100 years


For many years, North Carolina was known as the Rip Van Winkle state because it was so backward. Stingy public officials and business tycoons wanted low wages and low taxes so there was little investment in civic needs. Roads and other public facilities were ignored while education of the state’s youth was minimal.

<snip>

In the 1960s North Carolina experienced a transformation, melding with the modern world.

Governors Kerr Scott, Luther Hodges and Terry Sanford moved to join the mainstream. While Scott, Hodges and Sanford initiated the modernization momentum, it was in 1977 when Jim Hunt became governor that the state began the steady climb in education, civic improvements and broader prosperity. Critical to Hunt’s success was recruiting the business community and selling it on his agenda of public education, government services and modest environmental protection as critical to industrial and economic advancement.

The Research Triangle Park blossomed into a high-tech, high-wage and high-skilled business recruiting dynamo. Charlotte emerged as one of the nation’s leading financial centers while other areas of the state saw schools, community colleges and universities provide a trained labor force. The state’s national ranking rose under Democrat Jim Hunt and Republican Jim Martin (28th capita income in 2000). It seemed this new course had been irreversibly set.

<snip>

Ironically, it might have been the election of 2008 that sparked the GOP sweep of 2010. The Red State Project headed by Ed Gillespie and Karl Rove determined that to control a state and ultimately the federal government, they needed to take a sufficient number of state legislatures in a census year – thus controlling legislative redistricting. With that prize in view, Pope and Americans for Prosperity poured in millions. Republicans swept to victory in both the state House and Senate in 2010. They then imposed a redistricting plan that maximized the GOP strength and will likely keep them in place for at least the next decade.

<snip>

Now comes the 2014 election. In this off-year contest, incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan is locked in a tough race against Republican House Speaker Thom Tillis. When Tillis won the GOP primary, it was curiously hailed as a victory for the mainstream despite the fact that Tillis leads tea party forces in the legislature. Over $20 million of out-of-state money has poured in to defeat Hagan – control of the U.S. Senate hangs in the balance. Will the election be determined on the effectiveness of voter suppression efforts or will voter discontent for what is going on in Raleigh outweigh discontent with Washington government and the U.S. Congress?



Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/08/29/4106160/for-tar-heel-time-set-your-clock.html?sp=/99/108/374/#storylink=cpy

Another 18th Century marvelous automaton

is the The Peacock Clock that was a gift to Catherine the Great of Russia.

We saw it--not working--in The Hermitage when we were in St. Petersburg last May.




Here's a brief video explaining its origin and showing some of it working. There are lots more videos of it on youtube.

If you want to see statistics regarding suicide, this is a good resource

https://www.afsp.org/understanding-suicide/facts-and-figures
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