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Sherman A1

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Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 07:37 AM
Number of posts: 28,921

Journal Archives

Missouri S&T Engineers Inspect Jefferson City Tornado Damage To Make Houses Stronger

Engineering researchers from the Missouri University of Science and Technology are spending several days in Jefferson City to study the destruction caused by a tornado that battered the city late Wednesday.

Missouri S&T engineering professor Grace Yan and her graduate students began Thursday to interview residents and capture drone footage of the damages. Her research has focused on designing buildings to become more resistant to tornadoes.

There have been many examples of damages in Jefferson City that are unique to tornadoes, such as roofs being torn off, Yan said.

“We found, for a number of buildings, the roof is completely gone, or for some buildings, a part of the roof has been damaged,” said Yan, who directs the university’s Wind Hazards Mitigation Laboratory.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-st-engineers-inspect-jefferson-city-tornado-damage-make-houses-stronger

African-American Union Army soldiers died on their way home from war; then history lost their names

The elm and oak trees have grown tall with age in Section 57 of Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in south St. Louis County. It’s a quiet place, where songbirds rule the peace from the branches above.

Amid the white marble tombstones, row on row, stands one stone obelisk from another era. It marks the final resting place of African-American Civil War soldiers from Missouri who died from cholera in August 1866, as they made their way home from the war.

The soldiers were buried as Unknowns, even though the Army knew who they were. Last summer, their names were finally written in bronze.

Prodded by local historians, the Veterans Administration placed a marker next to the obelisk that includes the names of 118 soldiers of the 56th U.S. Colored Infantry who are buried at the site, plus 55 soldiers whose remains were never recovered.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/african-american-union-army-soldiers-died-their-way-home-war-then-history-lost-their-names

Andrew Yang Policy on PREVENT AIRLINES FROM REMOVING CUSTOMERS


Airlines have been overbooking their flights and then forcibly removing paying customers when an issue arises. The FAA should prevent this activity and force airlines to continue to offer a larger amount of money until someone takes them up on the offer and removes themselves from the flight. No one should be physically removed because the airline wants to make more money.

"If an airline wants a passenger to get off a plane in order to make more money, they should offer that money to passengers until someone says yes. We are human beings and your customers, not simply names on a screen."

"Direct the FAA to force airlines to have customers “auction” their seat back to the airline when they have overbooked the flight.
Direct the FAA to investigate any airline that forcibly removes a customer for any reason other than that customer is posing a threat to other customers."

https://www.yang2020.com/policies/prevent-airlines-removing-customers/

Andrew Yang Policy on PREVENT AIRLINES FROM REMOVING CUSTOMERS

Airlines have been overbooking their flights and then forcibly removing paying customers when an issue arises. The FAA should prevent this activity and force airlines to continue to offer a larger amount of money until someone takes them up on the offer and removes themselves from the flight. No one should be physically removed because the airline wants to make more money.

"If an airline wants a passenger to get off a plane in order to make more money, they should offer that money to passengers until someone says yes. We are human beings and your customers, not simply names on a screen."

"Direct the FAA to force airlines to have customers “auction” their seat back to the airline when they have overbooked the flight.
Direct the FAA to investigate any airline that forcibly removes a customer for any reason other than that customer is posing a threat to other customers."


https://www.yang2020.com/policies/prevent-airlines-removing-customers/

Missouri Corrections Department To Counties: The Check's In The Mail For Housing Inmates, Eventually

Counties across Missouri hoped this was the year that the Department of Corrections would make headway on the $20-$30 million they’re owed for housing inmates who eventually go to state prisons.

But legislators allocated only $1.75 million more to address the backlog. Missouri's practice of reimbursing counties in this way is unique in the United States, and local sheriffs and county leaders say it’s time for a better solution.

“I don't know what that is, but at the current rate we're operating, the state will never get ahead,” Cass County Sheriff Jeff Weber said. “We'll never get these costs caught up and we're going to keep plunging down that road. And I don't know what will happen in the future.”

It’s tricky to know the exact number of inmates being housed at any one time, Department of Corrections spokeswoman Karen Pojmann told KCUR 89.3, because counties are only reimbursed for the inmates who are convicted and sentenced to prison.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-corrections-department-counties-checks-mail-housing-inmates-eventually

Naomi Wolf admits blunder over Victorians and sodomy executions

Death sentences in 1800s were hardly ever carried out, despite claim in author’s book Outrages

It was only published this week, but already the writer Naomi Wolf has admitted an error at the heart of her latest book. Instead of being “actually executed for sodomy” in 1859, as the writer claims in Outrages, Thomas Silver was apparently “paroled two years after being convicted”.

Silver, who was 14 when he was convicted, is just one of several cases cited in the book but, according to the writer and broadcaster Matthew Sweet, the error stems from a simple misreading of a historical record and raises wider questions about the argument Wolf puts forward.

In Outrages, which was published by Virago, Wolf examines the effect of 19th-century legal changes on the lives of Victorian poets such as John Addington Symonds and argues that the Obscene Publications Act of 1857 marked a turning point in the treatment of gay people.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/may/24/naomi-wolf-admits-blunder-over-victorians-and-sodomy-executions?

Andrew Yang Policy on PROSPERITY GRANTS


In order to foster investment in the community, the federal government should give each working-age American $100 per year to donate to a 501(c)3 non-profit. This would funnel approx. $20 billion to local non-profits, and it can easily be paid for by reducing the tax credit for itemized donations to a maximum of 22% with a floor of $500 for itemized deductions.

"Philanthropy right now favors interest areas that the wealthy like to support, and the itemized charitable deduction is enjoyed almost entirely by the richest Americans. Making every American a philanthropist would facilitate new interactions in the community and diversify the organizations that are supported. It would also make sure that non-profits could be rewarded more by the people that they serve, increasing their efficiency."

"Direct the IRS to create a Prosperity Grant program.
Each year at the beginning of the year Americans would receive $100 that could only be donated to a 501c3 institution through the same mechanism that they receive the Freedom Dividend/Universal Basic Income.
Work with Congress to change the tax code to account for Prosperity Grants."

https://www.yang2020.com/policies/prosperity-grants/

Andrew Yang Policy on PROSPERITY GRANTS

In order to foster investment in the community, the federal government should give each working-age American $100 per year to donate to a 501(c)3 non-profit. This would funnel approx. $20 billion to local non-profits, and it can easily be paid for by reducing the tax credit for itemized donations to a maximum of 22% with a floor of $500 for itemized deductions.

"Philanthropy right now favors interest areas that the wealthy like to support, and the itemized charitable deduction is enjoyed almost entirely by the richest Americans. Making every American a philanthropist would facilitate new interactions in the community and diversify the organizations that are supported. It would also make sure that non-profits could be rewarded more by the people that they serve, increasing their efficiency."

"Direct the IRS to create a Prosperity Grant program.
Each year at the beginning of the year Americans would receive $100 that could only be donated to a 501c3 institution through the same mechanism that they receive the Freedom Dividend/Universal Basic Income.
Work with Congress to change the tax code to account for Prosperity Grants."


https://www.yang2020.com/policies/prosperity-grants/

Historic 'Shelley House' Added To Civil Rights Network


Melinda Jones stands next to her great-grandparents’ former house and shields her eyes against the already-hot morning sun.

The modest two-story brick house in the Greater Ville neighborhood was the backdrop for one of the most important court cases of the civil rights movement, which virtually abolished racially restrictive covenants used to prevent people of color from living in white communities.

The “Shelley House” was added to the African American Civil Rights Network Friday, making it the first property in Missouri to join the register.

“It’s just an amazing experience that I’m here to witness this,” said Jones, who attended the dedication ceremony with other Shelley family descendants.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/historic-shelley-house-added-civil-rights-network

Historic 'Shelley House' Added To Civil Rights Network

Melinda Jones stands next to her great-grandparents’ former house and shields her eyes against the already-hot morning sun.

The modest two-story brick house in the Greater Ville neighborhood was the backdrop for one of the most important court cases of the civil rights movement, which virtually abolished racially restrictive covenants used to prevent people of color from living in white communities.

The “Shelley House” was added to the African American Civil Rights Network Friday, making it the first property in Missouri to join the register.

“It’s just an amazing experience that I’m here to witness this,” said Jones, who attended the dedication ceremony with other Shelley family descendants.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/historic-shelley-house-added-civil-rights-network
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