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Sherman A1

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Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 07:37 AM
Number of posts: 29,660

Journal Archives

NLRB to Hear Trade Fair Dispute

NEW YORK — An ongoing tangle between Trade Fair supermarkets and its union-represented butchers could be headed for a hearing before the National Labor Relations Board.

The NLRB has issued a complaint against the Queens supermarket, finding there was sufficient merit in allegations of improper surveillance, interrogation, suspensions and terminations of employees engaged in union activities, among other charges, according to United Food and Commercial Workers Local 342.

Read More: http://supermarketnews.com/laws-amp-regulations/nlrb-hear-trade-fair-dispute#ixzz2XJEpXMut

June 26, 1934 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Federal Credit Union Act

The Federal Credit Union Act is an Act of Congress[1] enacted in 1934. The purpose of the law was to make credit available and promote thrift through a national system of nonprofit, cooperative credit unions. This Act established the federal credit union system and created the Bureau of Federal Credit Unions, the predecessor to the National Credit Union Administration, to charter and oversee federal credit unions. The general provisions in the Federal Act were based on the Massachusetts Credit Union Act of 1909,[2] and became the basis of many other state credit union laws. Under the provisions of the Federal Credit Union Act, a credit union may be chartered under either federal or state law, a system known as dual chartering, which is still in existence today.

Credit union law in the U.S. built on earlier legislation such as that developed by Franz Hermann Schulze-Delitzsch in Germany and Alphonse Desjardins in Canada. Among the individuals responsible for formulating credit union legislation in the United States were Edward Filene, Pierre Jay and Roy Bergengren.

The Act is amended periodically to evolve and remain a modern credit union law. This contemporary law, coupled with the NCUA Board's commitment to reduce regulatory burden, enables federal credit unions to offer a variety of services to meet the financial needs of their members. For example, in addition to basic passbook share savings accounts, many federal credit unions offer share drafts, share certificates, credit cards.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Credit_Union_Act

June 26: National Chocolate Pudding Day

MO Gov. vetoes Paycheck Deception Bill

Missouri labor leaders were swift to laud Gov. Jay Nixon within minutes after he announced Tuesday that he had vetoed SB29, a bill that would have barred public employers – including school boards and the city of St. Louis – from deducting union dues from members’ paychecks without annual authorization.

The bill would have required a separate annual authorization before dues money could be spent on political activities.

Nixon noted in his veto that the members already can change their authorizations at any time, and said that SB29 was actually about “singling out union dues…for no beneficial purpose.”

The governor, a lawyer and former attorney general, also questioned the constitutionality of the measure’s provision that exempted police, firefighters and other first-responders. Nixon wrote that the exemptions amounted to “disparate treatment to similarly situated people,’’ which he said violated the U.S. Constitution’s equal-protection clause.

https://www.stlbeacon.org/#!/content/31587/paycheck_sb29_veto_062513

Nixon vetoes bill to impose restrictions on public-sector union dues

Missouri labor leaders were swift to laud Gov. Jay Nixon within minutes after he announced Tuesday that he had vetoed SB29, a bill that would have barred public employers – including school boards and the city of St. Louis – from deducting union dues from members’ paychecks without annual authorization.

The bill would have required a separate annual authorization before dues money could be spent on political activities.

Nixon noted in his veto that the members already can change their authorizations at any time, and said that SB29 was actually about “singling out union dues…for no beneficial purpose.”

The governor, a lawyer and former attorney general, also questioned the constitutionality of the measure’s provision that exempted police, firefighters and other first-responders. Nixon wrote that the exemptions amounted to “disparate treatment to similarly situated people,’’ which he said violated the U.S. Constitution’s equal-protection clause.

https://www.stlbeacon.org/#!/content/31587/paycheck_sb29_veto_062513

June 25, 1976 – Missouri Gov. Kit Bond issues an executive order rescinding the Extermination Order

Missouri Executive Order 44, also known as the "Mormon Extermination Order"[1] (alt. exterminating order)[2] in Latter Day Saint history, was an executive order issued on October 27, 1838 by the governor of Missouri, Lilburn Boggs. It was issued in the aftermath of the Battle of Crooked River, a clash between Mormons and a unit of the Missouri State Guard in northern Ray County, Missouri, during the Mormon War of 1838. Insisting that the Mormons had committed "open and avowed defiance of the laws", and had "made war upon the people of this State," Boggs precipitously directed that "the Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the State if necessary for the public peace—their outrages are beyond all description".[2]

While the order is often referred to as the "Mormon Extermination Order" due to the phrasing used by Boggs, relatively few people lost their lives as a direct result of its issuance. However, the state militia and other authorities used Boggs' missive as a pretext to expel the Mormons from their lands in the state, and force them to migrate to Illinois. Mormons did not begin to return to Missouri until 25 years later, when they found a more welcoming environment and were able to establish homes there once more. In 1976, citing the unconstitutional nature of Boggs' directive, Missouri Governor Kit Bond formally rescinded it.[3


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extermination_Order_(Mormonism)

June 25, 1788 – Virginia becomes the 10th state to ratify the United States Constitution.

Virginia (i/vərˈdʒɪnjə/), officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a U.S. state located in the South Atlantic region of the United States. Virginia is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" and the "Mother of Presidents" after the eight U.S. presidents born there. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; and Virginia Beach is the most populous city. Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision, and the wealthiest is Loudoun County. The Commonwealth's population is 8,185,866 as of 2012.[2]

The area's history begins with several indigenous groups, including the Powhatan. In 1607 the London Company established the Colony of Virginia as the first permanent New World English colony. Slave labor and the land acquired from displaced Native American tribes each played a significant role in the colony's early politics and plantation economy. Virginia was one of the 13 Colonies in the American Revolution and joined the Confederacy in the American Civil War, during which Richmond was made the Confederate capital and Virginia's northwestern counties seceded to form the state of West Virginia. Although the Commonwealth was under conservative single-party rule for nearly a century following Reconstruction, both major national parties are competitive in modern Virginia.[5]

The Virginia General Assembly is the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World.[6] The state government has been repeatedly ranked most effective by the Pew Center on the States.[7] It is unique in how it treats cities and counties equally, manages local roads, and prohibits its governors from serving consecutive terms. Virginia's economy has many sectors: agriculture in the Shenandoah Valley; federal agencies in Northern Virginia, including the headquarters of the Department of Defense and CIA; and military facilities in Hampton Roads, the site of the region's main seaport. Virginia's public schools and many colleges and universities have contributed to growing media and technology sectors. As a result, computer chips have become the state's leading export.[8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia

No monkeying around: board game designer scores a success

When you play a board game, you don't expect to win every time. Well, maybe you hope to; but you don't. That's also true when you design a board game.

Mark Sellmeyer, a 49-year-old graphic designer and St. Louis native, kept trying, however. Now he has earned international recognition as a board game designer.

"I've played them for as long as I can remember," said Sellmeyer. "Me and a group of friends started off on magic, but burned out on that and continued with board games."

Sellmeyer, sporting a a ponytail that puts Willie Nelson to shame, got hooked during the renaissance of the mid-'90s. The market began to absorb new concepts flooding over games from Europe that differed from traditional American games that focused on player elimination. Think Risk or Monopoly. The European model was more structured, with time limits and players able to stay in for the entire game.

https://www.stlbeacon.org/#!/content/31313/mark_sellmeyer_st_louis_board_games?coverpage=3508

June 24: National Pralines Day

Hostess: Twinkies to return to shelves July 15

NEW YORK (AP) — Hostess is betting on a sweet comeback for Twinkies when they return to shelves next month.

The company that went bankrupt after an acrimonious fight with its unionized workers last year is back up and running under new owners and a leaner structure. It says it plans to have Twinkies and other snack cakes back on shelves starting July 15.

Based on the outpouring of nostalgia sparked by its demise, Hostess is expecting a blockbuster return next month for Twinkies and other sugary treats, such as CupCakes and Donettes. The company says the cakes will taste the same but that the boxes will now bear the tag line "The Sweetest Comeback In The History Of Ever."

"A lot of impostor products have come to the market while Hostess has been off the shelves," says Daren Metropoulos, a principal of the investment firm Metropoulos & Co., which teamed up with Apollo Global Management to buy a variety of Hostess snacks.


http://news.yahoo.com/hostess-twinkies-return-shelves-july-15-163913503.html
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