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Sherman A1

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Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 06:37 AM
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The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey


The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey
OCTOBER 23, 2019 BY A PUBLIC AFFAIR

The universal basic income (UBI) movement is gaining momentum in the United States, where cities like Stockton, California have implemented pilot programs and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang is running on a platform heavily based on principles of UBI, including the idea of giving every American a “freedom dividend” of $1,000 per month.

On today’s episode, Ali explores the challenges and possibilities of UBI with Annie Lowrey, author of Give People Money. They discuss prevailing myths and stereotypes about low-income families and “personal responsibility,” the ways UBI addresses racial and gender inequities, what it means to have “enough,” and much more.

Annie Lowrey is a journalist and staff writer for The Atlantic. She has written for the New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and other publications. She is the author of Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World (Crown, 2018).

https://www.wortfm.org/the-case-for-universal-basic-income-with-annie-lowrey

The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey

The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey
OCTOBER 23, 2019 BY A PUBLIC AFFAIR

The universal basic income (UBI) movement is gaining momentum in the United States, where cities like Stockton, California have implemented pilot programs and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang is running on a platform heavily based on principles of UBI, including the idea of giving every American a “freedom dividend” of $1,000 per month.

On today’s episode, Ali explores the challenges and possibilities of UBI with Annie Lowrey, author of Give People Money. They discuss prevailing myths and stereotypes about low-income families and “personal responsibility,” the ways UBI addresses racial and gender inequities, what it means to have “enough,” and much more.

Annie Lowrey is a journalist and staff writer for The Atlantic. She has written for the New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and other publications. She is the author of Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World (Crown, 2018).

https://www.wortfm.org/the-case-for-universal-basic-income-with-annie-lowrey

Futuristic 3D Printer Could Be the End of Molds, Warehouses

The shape of product distribution and warehousing is about to undergo some serious changes.

Researchers from Northwestern University have created a new 3D printer that could be the "future of manufacturing."

The HARP (High-Area Rapid Printing) can print objects the size of an adult human in a matter of hours. Typically, large format printers sacrifice speed and resolution for size. Just look at one of the first 3D printed cars. They called it "the Strati" for a reason.

HARP promises to make no such compromises.

The prototype printer is 13 feet tall and has a 2.5 square-foot print bed. It can print about 1.5 feet in an hour. So, if we're printing adult humans, my replica would take about six hours.



https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/futuristic-3d-printer-could-be-the-end-of-molds-warehouses/

'A Game Changer': Andrew Yang Explains How He'd Give Every American $1,000 Per Month


When you hear a big idea from a presidential candidate, do you ever want to ask: How would that work?

Two undecided voters John Zeitler, a 48-year-old attorney for an insurance company, and Hetel Jani, 38, who runs a nonprofit focused on education and mentorship, wanted to know more about the so-called "freedom dividend" from first-time presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

The voters, along with Morning Edition host Noel King, sat down with Yang at a midtown Manhattan a dumpling shop called Baodega – part of Off Script, a series of interviews with 2020 presidential candidates. Listen to the group's conversation about the freedom dividend by clicking the audio button above. Watch the full conversation here.

Yang, a tech entrepreneur and author, proposes that the government give every American adult $1,000 a month — a form of universal basic income, no strings attached. He says this income is necessary in order to address wide-scale job losses due to automation. It would help people have the resources to afford to look for work, care for a loved one, start a business or do nonprofit work.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/23/770962701/a-game-changer-andrew-yang-explains-how-he-d-give-every-american-1-000-per-month

'A Game Changer': Andrew Yang Explains How He'd Give Every American $1,000 Per Month

When you hear a big idea from a presidential candidate, do you ever want to ask: How would that work?

Two undecided voters John Zeitler, a 48-year-old attorney for an insurance company, and Hetel Jani, 38, who runs a nonprofit focused on education and mentorship, wanted to know more about the so-called "freedom dividend" from first-time presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

The voters, along with Morning Edition host Noel King, sat down with Yang at a midtown Manhattan a dumpling shop called Baodega – part of Off Script, a series of interviews with 2020 presidential candidates. Listen to the group's conversation about the freedom dividend by clicking the audio button above. Watch the full conversation here.

Yang, a tech entrepreneur and author, proposes that the government give every American adult $1,000 a month — a form of universal basic income, no strings attached. He says this income is necessary in order to address wide-scale job losses due to automation. It would help people have the resources to afford to look for work, care for a loved one, start a business or do nonprofit work.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/23/770962701/a-game-changer-andrew-yang-explains-how-he-d-give-every-american-1-000-per-month

Hasbro Stock Falls Because the Trade War Dragged on Earnings


Hasbro stock (ticker: HAS) tumbled more than 15% on Tuesday morning, after the toymaker’s third-quarter sales and profits missed analysts’ expectations.

The back story. Hasbro shares have been running ahead of the market, up more than 25% year to date, ahead of the S&P 500’s nearly 20% climb over the same period, and well ahead of rival Mattel’s (MAT) 4.5% gain. Hasbro enjoys lucrative licensing from major franchises and has been making acquisitions as well. The company, however, has an outsize exposure to China, which means that tariffs have been a major concern for investors.

What’s new. Early Tuesday, Hasbro said it earned $1.84 a share on revenue of $1.58 billion, while analysts were expecting per-share earnings of $2.17 on revenue of $1.71 billion. Operating margins in the U.S. and Canada slipped to 21.6% from 24.5% in the year-ago quarter, while international margins edged up to 12% from 11.9%. U.S. sales slipped 2% from a year earlier, while international revenues were flat (but up 4% on a constant currency basis).

Looking ahead. Both Hasbro and Mattel were shaken by the Toys “R” Us bankruptcy, and this is one of the first quarters that Hasbro has reported with the major retailer’s bankruptcy in the rearview mirror.

https://www.barrons.com/articles/hasbro-stock-trade-war-dragged-on-earnings-51571755289?

Hasbro Stock Falls Because the Trade War Dragged on Earnings

Hasbro stock (ticker: HAS) tumbled more than 15% on Tuesday morning, after the toymaker’s third-quarter sales and profits missed analysts’ expectations.

The back story. Hasbro shares have been running ahead of the market, up more than 25% year to date, ahead of the S&P 500’s nearly 20% climb over the same period, and well ahead of rival Mattel’s (MAT) 4.5% gain. Hasbro enjoys lucrative licensing from major franchises and has been making acquisitions as well. The company, however, has an outsize exposure to China, which means that tariffs have been a major concern for investors.

What’s new. Early Tuesday, Hasbro said it earned $1.84 a share on revenue of $1.58 billion, while analysts were expecting per-share earnings of $2.17 on revenue of $1.71 billion. Operating margins in the U.S. and Canada slipped to 21.6% from 24.5% in the year-ago quarter, while international margins edged up to 12% from 11.9%. U.S. sales slipped 2% from a year earlier, while international revenues were flat (but up 4% on a constant currency basis).

Looking ahead. Both Hasbro and Mattel were shaken by the Toys “R” Us bankruptcy, and this is one of the first quarters that Hasbro has reported with the major retailer’s bankruptcy in the rearview mirror.

https://www.barrons.com/articles/hasbro-stock-trade-war-dragged-on-earnings-51571755289?

Andrew Yang Says There Is No Guarantee Impeaching Trump Will Be Successful

Tech entrepreneur, author and Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang says the impeachment inquiry being conducted by House Democrats "is the right way to go."

But he also cautions that those who support impeachment should be realistic about the chances of a GOP-controlled Senate voting to remove President Trump from office.

"I think impeachment is the right way to go, but I do not think that we should have any illusions that it's necessarily going to be successful," Yang told NPR's Noel King on Saturday as part of NPR's Off Script series of interviews with 2020 presidential candidates.

"When we are talking about Donald Trump, we are losing to Donald Trump, even if it's in the context of talking about impeaching him," Yang said.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/19/770960883/andrew-yang-warns-there-is-no-guarantee-impeaching-trump-will-be-successful

Andrew Yang Says There Is No Guarantee Impeaching Trump Will Be Successful

Tech entrepreneur, author and Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang says the impeachment inquiry being conducted by House Democrats "is the right way to go."

But he also cautions that those who support impeachment should be realistic about the chances of a GOP-controlled Senate voting to remove President Trump from office.

"I think impeachment is the right way to go, but I do not think that we should have any illusions that it's necessarily going to be successful," Yang told NPR's Noel King on Saturday as part of NPR's Off Script series of interviews with 2020 presidential candidates.

"When we are talking about Donald Trump, we are losing to Donald Trump, even if it's in the context of talking about impeaching him," Yang said.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/19/770960883/andrew-yang-warns-there-is-no-guarantee-impeaching-trump-will-be-successful

What Would You Do With an Extra $500 a Month? A financial experiment in five true stories.


Soon after Michael Tubbs became mayor of Stockton, California, at the age of 26 — the youngest to be elected to a city of over 100,000 and Stockton’s first African-American mayor — he directed his policy fellows to research ways to reduce poverty. Four years earlier, in 2012, the city had declared bankruptcy, and it was still mired with high unemployment and crime. The team came back to report that one way to end poverty was to give people money.

This solution had a name, “universal basic income” (or UBI), and a long history in America as a social-policy idea. It had been embraced by Thomas Paine and Milton Friedman and made a cornerstone of the Poor People’s Campaign advanced by Martin Luther King Jr. Both Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter had proposed replacing welfare with a guaranteed income. More recently, the idea had been revived by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, who saw it as a remedy for the burgeoning “useless class” — all those people whose jobs technology is making obsolete.

Tubbs was skeptical, but the following May he attended a conference on the future of work, where he sat next to the economist and developer Natalie Foster. Along with Chris Hughes, a co-founder of Facebook, Foster had launched an advocacy group dedicated to advancing the conversation about guaranteed income. She told Tubbs they were looking for a test city, and he suggested that Stockton might be the perfect place.

Less than two years later, this past February, the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration gave 130 individuals, randomly selected from neighborhoods with a median household income at or below Stockton’s $46,033, their first monthly payment of $500, no strings attached. Over the program’s 18 months, SEED would track how the money was being spent and assess the subjects’ financial security and well-being as well as more subtle measures of the money’s impact, such as their feelings of hope and of mattering.

http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/10/universal-basic-income-stockton-california.html
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