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bronxiteforever

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Gender: Male
Hometown: Pennsylvania
Home country: Usa
Member since: Fri Jun 30, 2006, 07:47 PM
Number of posts: 7,286

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The US left a hole in leadership on climate. China is filling it.

China is making greater and faster strides than expected away from fossil fuels.
Politico.eu
By LUIZA CH. SAVAGE 8/17/19, 4:35 PM CET Updated 8/17/19, 4:37 PM CET

Often considered the bogeyman of global climate diplomacy, China is making greater and faster strides than expected away from fossil fuels — becoming the world’s largest investor in solar and wind technology and boasting more jobs in solar energy than in coal-mining. It’s all part of a longterm economic strategy to dominate in critical technologies.

The torrid pace and unprecedented scale of China’s investments in clean energy are driven in part by local concerns about toxic air quality. China remains the world’s leading emitter of greenhouse gases, accounting for roughly 30 percent of global carbon dioxide pollution.

But the moves are giving China a growing leadership role on the world stage — precisely at a time when Washington’s voice is becoming less relevant thanks to President Donald Trump’s announced plan to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, according to interviews with POLITICO’s Global Translations podcast.

...China is responsible for a third of wind turbines and solar panels in the world — and its investments have had the side effect of driving down the global price of solar and wind technologies by nearly three-quarters in the last decade...

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-china-climate-renewable-energy-sustainability-leadership-investment/

Posted by bronxiteforever | Sat Aug 17, 2019, 10:57 AM (3 replies)

The water is so hot in Alaska it's killing large numbers of salmon (CNN)

CNN
By Ryan Prior, CNN
Updated 7:23 AM ET, Sat August 17, 2019

CNN)Alaska has been in the throes of an unprecedented heat wave this summer, and the heat stress is killing salmon in large numbers.

Scientists have observed die-offs of several varieties of Alaskan salmon, including sockeye, chum and pink salmon. Stephanie Quinn-Davidson, director of the Yukon Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, told CNN she took a group of scientists on an expedition along Alaska's Koyokuk River at the end of July, after locals alerted her to salmon die-offs on the stream.

...The water temperatures have breaking records at the same time as the air temperatures, according to Sue Mauger, the science director for the Cook Inletkeeper.
Scientists have been tracking stream temperatures around the Cook Inlet, located south of Anchorage, since 2002. They've never recorded a temperature above 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Until now.On July 7, a major salmon stream on the west side of the Cook Inlet registered 81.7 degrees.

...last week the Environmental Protection Agency told staff scientists it would no longer oppose a mining project in Alaska that had the potential to devastate one of the world's most valuable wild salmon fisheries, just after President Trump met with Alaska's Gov. Mike Dunleavy.


https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/16/us/alaska-salmon-hot-water-trnd/index.html
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Posted by bronxiteforever | Sat Aug 17, 2019, 08:57 AM (8 replies)

The water is so hot in Alaska it's killing large numbers of salmon

CNN
By Ryan Prior, CNN
Updated 7:23 AM ET, Sat August 17, 2019

CNN)Alaska has been in the throes of an unprecedented heat wave this summer, and the heat stress is killing salmon in large numbers.

Scientists have observed die-offs of several varieties of Alaskan salmon, including sockeye, chum and pink salmon. Stephanie Quinn-Davidson, director of the Yukon Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, told CNN she took a group of scientists on an expedition along Alaska's Koyokuk River at the end of July, after locals alerted her to salmon die-offs on the stream.

...The water temperatures have breaking records at the same time as the air temperatures, according to Sue Mauger, the science director for the Cook Inletkeeper.
Scientists have been tracking stream temperatures around the Cook Inlet, located south of Anchorage, since 2002. They've never recorded a temperature above 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Until now.On July 7, a major salmon stream on the west side of the Cook Inlet registered 81.7 degrees.

...last week the Environmental Protection Agency told staff scientists it would no longer oppose a mining project in Alaska that had the potential to devastate one of the world's most valuable wild salmon fisheries, just after President Trump met with Alaska's Gov. Mike Dunleavy.


https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/16/us/alaska-salmon-hot-water-trnd/index.html
Posted by bronxiteforever | Sat Aug 17, 2019, 08:55 AM (0 replies)

NASA scientists track Greenland's melting ice, and the findings are not good

By Associated Press
Published: Aug 15, 2019 7:16 p.m. ET

‘It’s a little scary’ as climate change eats away at massive glaciers

ABOARD A NASA RESEARCH PLANE OVER GREENLAND-
...Like nearly every other glacier on Greenland, the massive Kangerlussuaq is melting. In fact, the giant frozen island has seen one of its biggest melts on record this year. NASA scientist Josh Willis is now closely studying the phenomenon in hopes of figuring out precisely how global warming is eating away at Greenland’s ice.

...Water brings more heat to something frozen faster than air does, as anyone who has ever defrosted a steak under the faucet knows. If Willis’ theory that much of the damage is from the water turns out to be correct, he said, “there’s a lot higher potential for Greenland to melt more quickly than we thought.” And that means seas rising faster and coastal communities being inundated more.

Greenland contains enough ice to make world sea levels rise by 20 feet if it were all to melt. In a single day this month, it lost a record 13.7 billion tons by one estimate.

“It’s a little scary,” Willis said as looked down on an area filled with more water than ice. “We’re definitely watching the ice sheet disappear in front of us.”

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/nasa-scientists-track-greenlands-melting-ice-and-the-findings-are-not-good-2019-08-15



Posted by bronxiteforever | Thu Aug 15, 2019, 08:18 PM (4 replies)

'The Sea Will Get as Hot as a Jacuzzi': What Life in Israel Will Be Like in 2100

“The Sea Will Get as Hot as a Jacuzzi': What Life in Israel Will Be Like in 2100

Winter will get much shorter and even nighttime won't offer respite from the heat. Israel is warming up, and by the end of the century we simply won’t be able to exist without air conditioning
Haaretz
By Oded Carmeli Aug 15, 2019

“I’m happy I won’t be alive,” says Baruch Rinkevich of Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, who is currently helping to prepare the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s next report on the oceans and the cryosphere.

“After us, the deluge, as the saying goes. People don’t fully understand what we’re talking about here,” explains Prof. Rinkevich, a marine biologist. “They think about melting icebergs and polar bears who won’t have a home. They don’t understand that everything is expected to change: the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, the landscapes we see, the oceans, the seasons, the daily routine, the quality of life. Our children will have to adapt or become extinct...”

To prepare this report, Haaretz spoke to a number of Israeli scientists from a range of disciplines. All the interviewees were asked to address the anticipated implications of a “moderate” rise of only 2 to 3 degrees Celsius, the midrange of the IPCC forecast. The picture that emerges, however threatening, is the most realistic one for the near future. And even it might be overly optimistic.

...“On the hottest days of the year it will be impossible to exist without an air conditioner,” explains Daniel Rosenfeld, of the Institute of Earth Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. “It will no longer be a matter of comfort but of survival. A broken air conditioner is liable to become a life-and-death issue.”


A stunning article filled with quotes from thoughtful and brilliant scientists. A long, well written article there is much more here-
https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-the-sea-will-get-as-hot-as-a-jacuzzi-what-life-in-israel-will-look-like-in-2100-1.7688062

Posted by bronxiteforever | Thu Aug 15, 2019, 07:51 PM (21 replies)

'The Sea Will Get as Hot as a Jacuzzi': What Life in Israel Will Be Like in 2100

Winter will get much shorter and even nighttime won't offer respite from the heat. Israel is warming up, and by the end of the century we simply won’t be able to exist without air conditioning
Haaretz
By Oded Carmeli Aug 15, 2019

“I’m happy I won’t be alive,” says Baruch Rinkevich of Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, who is currently helping to prepare the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s next report on the oceans and the cryosphere.

“After us, the deluge, as the saying goes. People don’t fully understand what we’re talking about here,” explains Prof. Rinkevich, a marine biologist. “They think about melting icebergs and polar bears who won’t have a home. They don’t understand that everything is expected to change: the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, the landscapes we see, the oceans, the seasons, the daily routine, the quality of life. Our children will have to adapt or become extinct...”

To prepare this report, Haaretz spoke to a number of Israeli scientists from a range of disciplines. All the interviewees were asked to address the anticipated implications of a “moderate” rise of only 2 to 3 degrees Celsius, the midrange of the IPCC forecast. The picture that emerges, however threatening, is the most realistic one for the near future. And even it might be overly optimistic.

The combination of these two parameters, heat and humidity, is called the Heat Stress Index. Brief exposure to conditions of a high HSI can raise the body temperature to between 38 and 40 degrees Celsius (normal is 37 degrees, or 98.6 F), resulting in headaches, vomiting and shallow breathing. When body heat reaches 41 degrees or more, multi-systemic damage occurs, affecting the brain, the heart, the liver and the kidneys, which can lead to loss of consciousness, spasms, even death. Elderly and infirm people, as well as infants and children, are the first to suffer and die in such a situation, because the heat-regulation mechanisms in their bodies are less efficient.
In July 2015, residents of the Iranian city of Bandar Mahshahr awoke to a temperature of 46 degrees Celsius (115 F), accompanied by high humidity from the Persian Gulf. The result was an unimaginable HSI of 74 degrees – the second-highest ever recorded (the highest on record is 81 degrees, in 2003, in the Saudi Arabian city of Dhahran). At that level of heat overload, even someone at full repose in the shade is incapable of cooling his or her body down by means of perspiration and is in genuine mortal danger, like someone trapped in a locked car in the summer.
By 2100, Israelis, too, could wake up to days like that.


A stunning article filled with quotes from thoughtful and brilliant scientists.

https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-the-sea-will-get-as-hot-as-a-jacuzzi-what-life-in-israel-will-look-like-in-2100-1.7688062
Posted by bronxiteforever | Thu Aug 15, 2019, 03:15 PM (6 replies)

Rising Seas Could Speed Up Loss of Florida Mangroves, Study Finds

WJCT Public Media
By JENNY STALETOVICH
August14, 2019

Four thousand years ago, rising seas decimated huge swaths of mangroves in Florida Bay.
Today, seas rising at a far greater rate, combined with increasing storms and drought, could lead to another catastrophic loss of mangroves that help keep the state from sliding into the sea, according to a new study published by the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal Nature Communications. This was surprising because mangroves are thought to be relatively resilient to sea level rise," said Miriam Jone, a USGS geologist and lead author for the study.

Mangroves serve as a critical link between the land and sea, helping to stabilize the coastline while protecting it against violent storm surges generated by hurricanes. Mangrove forests also suck up tons of carbon from the atmosphere, providing a carbon sink for the state valued at between $2 billion and $3.4 billion.

But scientists fear they are coming under increasing threat, from both development and impacts from climate change. About half the planet's mangroves have disappeared. After Hurricane Irma, NASA researchers during aerial surveys discovered about 40 percent of mangroves in Everglades National Park had been damaged. Mangroves have evolved to withstand hurricanes, so they expected them to bounce back. But when they returned three months later, they were suprised to find how little of the forest had recovered.

In the Caribbean, mangroves have fared better where ecoystems were healthier... "We know that mangroves can be resilient under high rates of sea level rise, but it also depends on how healthy the ecosystem is," Jones said.
More here
https://news.wjct.org/post/rising-seas-could-speed-loss-florida-mangroves-study-finds
Posted by bronxiteforever | Wed Aug 14, 2019, 06:08 PM (0 replies)

Rising Seas Could Speed Up Loss of Florida Mangroves, Study Finds

WJCT Public Media
By JENNY STALETOVICH
August14, 2019

Four thousand years ago, rising seas decimated huge swaths of mangroves in Florida Bay.
Today, seas rising at a far greater rate, combined with increasing storms and drought, could lead to another catastrophic loss of mangroves that help keep the state from sliding into the sea, according to a new study published by the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal Nature Communications. This was surprising because mangroves are thought to be relatively resilient to sea level rise," said Miriam Jone, a USGS geologist and lead author for the study.

Mangroves serve as a critical link between the land and sea, helping to stabilize the coastline while protecting it against violent storm surges generated by hurricanes. Mangrove forests also suck up tons of carbon from the atmosphere, providing a carbon sink for the state valued at between $2 billion and $3.4 billion.

But scientists fear they are coming under increasing threat, from both development and impacts from climate change. About half the planet's mangroves have disappeared. After Hurricane Irma, NASA researchers during aerial surveys discovered about 40 percent of mangroves in Everglades National Park had been damaged. Mangroves have evolved to withstand hurricanes, so they expected them to bounce back. But when they returned three months later, they were suprised to find how little of the forest had recovered.

In the Caribbean, mangroves have fared better where ecoystems were healthier... "We know that mangroves can be resilient under high rates of sea level rise, but it also depends on how healthy the ecosystem is," Jones said.


More here
https://news.wjct.org/post/rising-seas-could-speed-loss-florida-mangroves-study-finds

Posted by bronxiteforever | Wed Aug 14, 2019, 06:07 PM (4 replies)

Beaches close in Palm Beach County: Why are warnings late and where's this bacteria coming from?

By Kimberly Miller
Palm Beach Post
Posted at 3:52 PM
Updated at 3:58 PM

Another round of beaches closed Wednesday because of harmful bacteria levels. Unfortunately, the ‘no-swimming’ warnings you get are usually too late. Also, as of now it’s almost impossible to find out where the bacteria is coming from.

On Wednesday, another round of Palm Beach County beaches were closed because of harmful bacteria levels that were in some cases nearly three times higher than what is needed for an advisory. The closures mark 14 times this year advisories were issued at county beaches. In all of 2018, 15 advisories were issued.

...a lack of water circulation and heavy runoff are likely key reasons for enterococcus advisories. That could be why the Gulf Coast suffers more advisory days with runoff from rivers such as the Hillsborough into Tampa Bay, the Peace River into Charlotte Harbor and the Caloosahatchee River into San Carlos Bay.

“The biggest thing I would think is the flushing,” said Sullivan, noting that testing for enterococci is a laborious process that can take two days. “An E. coli detector is the holy grail of technology.”

https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/20190814/beaches-close-in-palm-beach-county-why-are-warnings-late-and-wherersquos-this-bacteria-coming-from
Posted by bronxiteforever | Wed Aug 14, 2019, 05:08 PM (2 replies)

No chance of US trade deal if Irish Accord hit-Pelosi

A US-UK trade deal will not get through Congress if Brexit undermines the Good Friday Agreement, the Speaker of the US House of Representatives has said.
BBC News
August 14,2019

Democrat Nancy Pelosi, whose party controls the House, said the UK's exit from the EU could not be allowed to endanger the Irish peace deal. Her comments came after the US national security adviser said the UK would be "first in line" for a trade deal.
John Bolton spoke after meeting Prime Minister Boris Johnson in London.

The reimposition of frontier controls between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland if the UK leaves the EU without mutual agreement on 31 October - a so-called "hard Brexit" - is seen as a threat to the 1998 Good Friday Agreement, which ended decades of bloodshed in Northern Ireland.
"Whatever form it takes, Brexit cannot be allowed to imperil the Good Friday Agreement, including the seamless border between the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland," Ms Pelosi said in a statement on Wednesday.

...Lewis Lukens, a former deputy chief of mission at the US embassy in London and former acting US ambassador, said Mr Bolton was aligned to President Trump's "America first agenda" and would be making "strong demands" on the UK to back the US position on issues like China, Iran and Chinese tech giant Huawei.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49348062
Posted by bronxiteforever | Wed Aug 14, 2019, 01:19 PM (1 replies)
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