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demmiblue

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Member since: Thu Feb 14, 2008, 11:58 AM
Number of posts: 31,153

Journal Archives

The Polish historian & political scientist Jerzy Targalski remained completely unruffled...

https://twitter.com/rudybouma/status/1015654368090185728

Boris Johnson Resigns as U.K. Foreign Secretary

Source: Bloomberg

Boris Johnson has resigned as U.K. Foreign Secretary, Bloomberg News reports.

A spokesman for Downing Street said: “This afternoon, the Prime Minister accepted the resignation of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary. His replacement will be announced shortly. The Prime Minister thanks Boris for his work.”

Developing...

Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-07-09/boris-johnson-resigns-as-u-k-foreign-secretary?utm_content=business&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_medium=social&cmpid=socialflow-twitter-business&utm_source=twitter

Happy Birthday, John Dingell!

https://twitter.com/JohnDingell/status/1015955871371849728
https://twitter.com/gretchenwhitmer/status/1015983550263431170

Gavin McInnes is going after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez:

https://twitter.com/Ocasio2018/status/1015968113832185856

Rainmaker by Hung Liu



Trained as a social realist and muralist in her native China, Hung Liu now blends Chinese and Western artistic influences to explore Chinese history and culture, gender, identity, and memory.

Liu’s personal history dovetails with major changes in her native country. Born in Changchun, China, in 1948, Liu came of age under the communist regime of Mao Zedong. In her early 20s, Liu labored four years in rice and wheat fields for her agrarian re-education as part of Mao’s Cultural Revolution. During the 1970s, she completed her art and education degree and began a teaching career. Then, in 1984, Liu entered the Visual Arts Department at University of California, San Diego, and has lived and worked in the United States since then.

During her first trip back to China in 1991, Liu discovered a cache of 19th- and early 20th-century commercial-studio photographs portraying various Chinese female types prominent in pre-revolutionary China: prostitutes, child street acrobats, women laborers, war refugees. Fascinated by the shifting meanings that result when a historical photograph is separated from its original context, Liu began incorporating such imagery into her paintings.

Liu’s mature painting style combines these historical photographs with imagery and motifs from Chinese painting, as well as objects like ancient Chinese pottery and bronzes. Liu has written of such works, “I hope to wash my subjects of their ‘otherness’ and reveal them as dignified, even mythic figures on the grander scale of history painting.”

https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/hung-liu


https://twitter.com/WomenInTheArts/status/1015966316904239104

Feeling exhausted by the state of the political world? Auntie @RepMaxineWaters has some words of...

https://twitter.com/Essence/status/1015644011514777600

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on AM Joy (7-7-2018):

Trump lawyers call Comey 'Machiavellian' in note to Mueller

Source: AP

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for President Donald Trump unleashed a blistering attack on former FBI Director James Comey in a confidential memo last year to the special counsel, casting him as “Machiavellian,” dishonest and “unbounded by law and regulation” as they sought to undermine the credibility of a law enforcement leader they see as a critical witness against the president.

The letter, obtained by The Associated Press, provides a window into the formation of a legal strategy currently used by Trump’s lawyers as they seek to pit the president’s word against that of the former FBI director. Comey’s firing in May 2017 helped set in motion the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller, and one-on-one conversations with Trump that Comey documented in a series of memos helped form the basis of Mueller’s inquiry into whether the president obstructed justice.

Mueller is looking broadly into Russia’s meddling in the U.S. election and its contacts with people in Trump’s campaign.

The June 27, 2017, letter was written by Marc Kasowitz, then the president’s lead lawyer, as Mueller and his team were in the early stages of their investigation into Trump associates and as they had begun examining whether the president, by firing Comey, had sought to stymie an FBI investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia. The White House initially pointed as justification for the firing to a Justice Department memo that faulted Comey for his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, though Trump later said that “this Russia thing” was on his mind when he made the move.

Read more: https://apnews.com/65fe7f37672b40239050b4b985aaf395?utm_medium=AP&utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true&__twitter_impression=true



https://twitter.com/AP/status/1015626606726012928

North Korea Foreign Ministry says talks with Pompeo 'regrettable,' accuses US of unilateral demands

Source: WaPo/AP

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea Foreign Ministry says talks with Pompeo ‘regrettable,’ accuses US of unilateral demands for denuclearization.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/north-korea-foreign-ministry-says-talks-with-pompeo-regrettable-accuses-us-of-unilateral-demands-for-denuclearization/2018/07/07/e9c3c57a-81e2-11e8-b3b5-b61896f90919_story.html



More:

North Korea says high-level talks with a U.S. delegation led by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were "regrettable" and has accused Washington of trying to unilaterally pressure the country into abandoning its nukes.

The statement by an unnamed North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman on Saturday came hours after Pompeo concluded two days of talks with North Korean officials led by Kim Yong Chol.

The statement says that the United States betrayed the spirit of last month's summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un by making unilateral demands on "CVID," or the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea.

It says the outcome of the follow-up talks was "very concerning" because it has led to a "dangerous phase that might rattle our willingness for denuclearization that had been firm."

https://apnews.com/628db42343bf402fa69f0500644a7293?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=AP&utm_campaign=SocialFlow&__twitter_impression=true&__twitter_impression=true&__twitter_impression=true

Paul Krugman: How to Lose a Trade War

Trump’s declaration that “trade wars are good, and easy to win” is an instant classic, right up there with Herbert Hoover’s “prosperity is just around the corner.”

Trump obviously believes that trade is a game in which he who runs the biggest surplus wins, and that America, which imports more than it exports, therefore has the upper hand in any conflict. That’s also why Peter Navarro predicted that nobody would retaliate against Trump’s tariffs. Since that’s actually not how trade works, we’re already facing plenty of retaliation and the strong prospect of escalation.

But here’s the thing: Trump’s tariffs are badly designed even from the point of view of someone who shares his crude mercantilist view of trade. In fact, the structure of his tariffs so far is designed to inflict maximum damage on the U.S. economy, for minimal gain. Foreign retaliation, by contrast, is far more sophisticated: unlike Trump, the Chinese and other targets of his trade wrath seem to have a clear idea of what they’re trying to accomplish.

The key point is that the Navarro/Trump view, aside from its fixation on trade balances, also seems to imagine that the world still looks the way it did in the 1960s, when trade was overwhelmingly in final goods like wheat and cars. In that world, putting a tariff on imported cars would cause consumers to switch to domestic cars, adding auto industry jobs, end of story (except for the foreign retaliation.)

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/07/opinion/how-to-lose-a-trade-war.html
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