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Scuba

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Member since: Thu Apr 29, 2010, 02:31 PM
Number of posts: 53,475

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Republiconnians 13:2~4

The U.S. ranks 13 out of 16 countries in energy efficiency, Germany is #1

http://www.treehugger.com/energy-efficiency/us-ranks-13-out-16-energy-efficiency-germany-1.html

Waste is ugly. Doing more with less is beautiful. Many of us try to live by these sayings in our personal lives, but at the country level, too few nations really give their best effort. Energy efficiency makes almost everything else that we need to do to transition to a better, more sustainable future easier because so many of our problems can trace their roots back to energy production. If we use less energy to do what we need to do, we both directly reduce pollution from whatever dirty sources we're using, and we make it easier to replace those with clean power.

The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), who has been ranking U.S. states by their energy efficiency (see below), has come out with a report that looks at how energy efficient 16 of the biggest economies in the world are. If you look at the map at the top of this article, it shows the results, with the U.S. sadly coming near the bottom, behind China and India, among other big countries, and slightly ahead of Russia, Brazil, and Mexico.

Here's the list if you can't see the numbers on the graphic too well: (1) Germany; (2) Italy; (3) the European Union; (tied for 4) China; (tied for 4) France; (tied for 6) Japan; (tied for 6) United Kingdom; (8) Spain; (9) Canada; (10) Australia; (11) India; (12) South Korea; (13) United States; (14) Russia; (15) Brazil; and (16) Mexico.

Note that the EU was also evaluated as a whole, and ranks #3. Very good for such a diverse set of countries!

State rankings:

Wisconsin: Jon Erpenbach on Wisconsin Grants Waitlists for UW System and Wisconsin Technical College

http://legis.wisconsin.gov/senate/erpenbach/PressReleases/Pages/Statement-regarding-Wisconsin-Grants-Waitlists-for-UW-System-and-Wisconsin-Technical-Colleges-Students.aspx

If you need a job you might have to go back to school to be able to find one. Unfortunately, significantly underfunded Wisconsin Grants (formerly WHEG Grants) was THE barrier for over 40,000 potential students last year. 3,581 currently enrolled UW System students qualified for ‘Wisconsin Grants’ but were turned away for lack of funds. The Wisconsin Technical Colleges numbers were a lot worse; 37,844 applicants to Technical College schools qualified for and applied for ‘Wisconsin Grants’ but were turned away for lack of funds. These numbers are extremely high as Wisconsin continues to struggle to put people back to work. ‘Wisconsin Grants’ are a need based grants system for those seeking education at the lowest end of income. Fully funding these grants is a key part of our economic engine. As we continue to work to for job growth, we need to have qualified people to fill the jobs.



So much for Scott Walker giving a s**t about students, jobs, citizens, our University System, Technical Colleges or anything else besides his owners, er, donors.

RoJo on Tea Party Controlling the Republican Senate Caucus: "We're Getting Close"

http://www.uppitywis.org/blogarticle/rojo-tea-party-controlling-republican-senate-caucus-were-getting

New video has been unearthed of U.S. Senator Ron Johnson talking about his failed 2012 election for vice chair of the Senate's Republican caucus.

Johnson says in the video that his narrow defeat "sent a pretty powerful signal to leadership and America" that "the Tea Party Movement folks... is growing-- we're getting close."

Video:




This asshat couldn't lead his grandmother into the kitchen.

How Playing An Instrument Might Actually Make You Smarter

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/playing-instrument-smarter-teded_n_5648621.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000043&ir=Science

It lights up your brain like fireworks on the Fourth of July, spurring on complicated processes and making connections like crazy. Your synapses fire. Your neurons are in hyperdrive. This is your brain on music.



We're still learning more about how our brains work, but thanks to neuroimaging technology we do know that playing music requires some pretty unique mental acrobatics. Many things we do are associated with activity in singular part of the brain. Playing an instrument, in contrast, engages almost every part of the brain simultaneously, according to a recent Ted-Ed lesson from educator Anita Collins. The parts each process different information, relating and interrelating it with incredible speed.

And all that violin and oboe practice adds up, meaning that as you get better at playing tricky concertos, your brain gets better at processing all the information that made it possible. That newfound strength can then be applied to other, non-musical activities.

We're not saying that you should give up your SAT flashcards for a quick tutorial on maracas, but if that's just one way that playing music benefits your brain, it sounds like musicians might be on the right track. Watch the lesson above for more

How Playing An Instrument Might Actually Make You Smarter

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/playing-instrument-smarter-teded_n_5648621.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000043&ir=Science

It lights up your brain like fireworks on the Fourth of July, spurring on complicated processes and making connections like crazy. Your synapses fire. Your neurons are in hyperdrive. This is your brain on music.



We're still learning more about how our brains work, but thanks to neuroimaging technology we do know that playing music requires some pretty unique mental acrobatics. Many things we do are associated with activity in singular part of the brain. Playing an instrument, in contrast, engages almost every part of the brain simultaneously, according to a recent Ted-Ed lesson from educator Anita Collins. The parts each process different information, relating and interrelating it with incredible speed.

And all that violin and oboe practice adds up, meaning that as you get better at playing tricky concertos, your brain gets better at processing all the information that made it possible. That newfound strength can then be applied to other, non-musical activities.

We're not saying that you should give up your SAT flashcards for a quick tutorial on maracas, but if that's just one way that playing music benefits your brain, it sounds like musicians might be on the right track. Watch the lesson above for more

One in three convenience stores is robbed because they unwisely have money in the cash register.

http://feministing.com/2014/08/04/victim-blaming-anti-drinking-posters-in-the-uk-get-edited/

Victim-blaming anti-drinking posters in the UK get edited

The United Kingdom’s National Health Service is facing a backlash for posters from an anti-drinking campaign called “Know Your Limits” that ran several years ago and still pepper college and hospital walls. A petition calling the posters ”a blatant and appalling case of victim-blaming, putting the onus on the victim rather than the perpetrator” has gotten over 100,000 signatures. But since NHS insists there’s nothing they can do since the campaign is over, I’m liking this more direct approach taken by British blogger @neverjessie even more.



The NHS posters are similar to those awful ads put out by The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board a few years ago. As Jos wrote then, “Getting drunk can be a bad idea for a whole host of reasons and that is a conversation to have. But the one that says getting drunk makes other people a danger to you? Not so much.” Maybe NHS can redeem themselves by launching a new campaign that tackles rape culture. We’ve seen more than a few great campaigns that do that in recent years, so they have some models to work from.

Top Ten Things Wisconsin Primary Voters Need to Know | Government Accountability Board

From my email ....


Date:

August 5, 2014
MADISON, WI – The Government Accountability Board today released its list of the top 10 things Wisconsin voters should know for the Partisan Primary on Tuesday, August 12, 2014.
The number one thing voters should know is that they must bring an acceptable proof of residence document if they plan to register at the polling place on Election Day, including updating their name or address.

“Election Day registration ensures that everyone who is qualified to vote will get to vote,” said Kevin Kennedy, director and general counsel of the G.A.B. “However, you will need to bring a proof of residence document with you if you want to register on Election Day.”

To register on Election Day, Wisconsin voters must provide proof of residence, which includes a current utility bill, lease, university ID card or other official document showing the voter’s name and current address. A list of acceptable documents is available at http://gab.wi.gov. Before Election Day, you must have lived at your current address for at least 28 days to be eligible to vote, but the proof of residence document does not need to be 28 days old. Voters who have a current, valid Wisconsin driver license or Wisconsin state ID card will be required to use their license or ID number to complete the registration form. Otherwise, they may use the last four digits of their Social Security number.

You can also register to vote before Election Day. Registration in your municipal clerk’s office takes place until 5:00 p.m. on the Friday before the election (August 8, 2014). Remember, you will still need to bring your proof of residence document to register.

Voters who may not be sure whether their registration is current can check their status with their municipal clerk, or on the state’s MyVote Wisconsin website https://myvote.wi.gov . My Vote Wisconsin is also a great resource to find your municipal clerk’s contact information, and your polling place.

Number two on the list is that voters may only vote for candidates of one party in the partisan primary.

Some voters think that they can vote for any candidate in a primary election, but this has not been the case since 1905, when Wisconsin went to a system of partisan primaries.

“Unlike the November General Election, the Partisan Primary in August is for voters to nominate who they would like to move on to the November election,” said Kennedy. “But the law says voters can only participate in one party’s primary.”

Elections Division Administrator Michael Haas reminds voters that if your municipality has electronic voting equipment, it is programed to reject ballots with crossover votes. “If you make a mistake and vote in multiple parties, ask a poll worker for a new ballot. You may do this up to three times,” Haas said.

Number three is that voters do not have to show a photo ID to receive a primary ballot on August 12.

Even though the Wisconsin Supreme Court recently ruled that the state’s Voter Photo ID Law is constitutional, there is a separate federal court order blocking it. Any Wisconsin election official who requests a photo ID from a voter in order to receive a ballot would violate that federal court order.

Wisconsin’s Attorney General has announced that he plans to seek reinstatement of Voter Photo ID in a federal appeals court, but such a reversal is extremely unlikely for the August 12 Partisan Primary, Kennedy said.
“If the federal court order blocking the Voter Photo ID Law is overturned before the November 4 General Election, the G.A.B. will notify the public and local election officials,” Kennedy said.

For more information about the current state of the Voter Photo ID Law, visit the G.A.B. website: http://gab.wi.gov/elections-voting/photo-id.

The remainder of the Top 10 things voters should know are:

4. You can still vote by absentee ballot. All registered, eligible voters can receive an absentee ballot by mail or in their municipal clerk’s office. You may vote an absentee ballot in your clerk’s office between the third Monday and the last Friday before an election (July 21 - August 8, 2014). Hours vary by municipality. Contact your municipal clerk for the times and location of absentee voting. Please note that due to a recent legislative change you may no longer vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office on weekends.

You can also request a ballot by mail. All requests must be received by your municipal clerk no later than 5:00 p.m. on the Thursday before the election (August 7, 2014). To find your municipal clerk’s contact information and an absentee ballot request form please visit https://myvote.wi.gov .

5. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Election Day: If you had an absentee ballot mailed to you, it must be postmarked by Election Day and must be received in your municipal clerk’s office by 4 p.m. the Friday after the election (August 15, 2014).

6. What to do about problems at the polling place. “If you see voter fraud, voter intimidation, electioneering or misconduct by election officials, your first point of contact should be the chief election inspector at the polling place,” said Kennedy. “The chief inspector is the lead poll worker and can usually resolve most polling place issues. But if that doesn’t work, you can contact your municipal clerk’s office or local law enforcement.”

Complaints or issues that are not resolved to the voter’s satisfaction should be reported to the G.A.B. Voters can go online and report problems at http://gab.wi.gov/complaints or they can call 1-866-VOTE-WIS.

7. Election observers must follow the rules: Election observers are welcome at every polling place, but they must obey the instructions of the chief election inspector, and may not interact with voters. Observers who disobey will be asked to leave, and may not observe at other polling places on Election Day. Rules for election observers are available at the polling place and on the G.A.B. website: http://gab.wi.gov/publications/rules/gab004

8. Leave political items at home: Voters are asked not to wear political clothing or paraphernalia to the polling place on Election Day. The chief election inspector may ask voters to leave the polling place if they are judged to be electioneering or creating a disturbance.

9. Don’t take a picture of your ballot: Some voters want to share pictures of their ballot with friends on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, or other photo sharing apps. But under Wisconsin law it is illegal to show your marked ballot to another person, which is what you would be doing if you took a picture and shared it online.

10. Consider becoming a poll worker: Many Wisconsin cities, villages and towns need more civic-minded people to help out on Election Day. When you go to vote, take a look around see if it is something you would like to do. Many places offer split shifts if you can’t work the entire day. Contact your local municipal clerk’s office for more information.

For more information, contact:

Reid Magney, Public Information Officer, 608-267-7887

We just can't afford to take care of all the poor people in the world.

Not if we want to wage endless wars, anyway ...

The Disrespected, Manipulated Wisconsin Electorate

http://thepoliticalenvironment.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-disrespected-manipulated-wisconsin.html

There has never been a Wisconsin Governor in our memories prior to Wrong Way Walker who so widely disrespected the time, resources and basic interests of so many Wisconsinites, particularly the state's lower-income residents, just to advance his own political career.

* If you are a low-income Wisconsin homeowner and/or low-income wage-earner, Walker's first budget raised your taxes, despite his denials designed to put forward an ideological fiction that he was a tax-cutter only.

* That budget also cut low-income families' Welfare-to-Work (W-2) $20 a month, just to get poor people more motivated to find work, as I wrote, citing Walker's budget language, in early 2011: It's right there in the budget, on page 65, in the "Health and Human Services" section (really): "To further encourage W-2 recipients to recognize that the goal of W-2 is for participants to secure unsubsidized employment, reduce the monthly benefit check by $20."

* If you are a low-income woman using one of several Planned Parenthood clinics around the state which Walker's budget shut down, then feel free drive or hitch yourself a ride since you've got nothing better to do with your time to another county or part of the state. That was done so Walker could please his important Right-to-Life constituency.

* If you are a low-income wage earner making just above the poverty line, Walker made things more difficult for you by turning down no-cost federal funding to help maintain your BadgerCare health insurance.




More at the link above.
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