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ancianita

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Hometown: New England, The South, Midwest
Home country: USA
Current location: Chicago
Member since: Sat Mar 5, 2011, 12:32 PM
Number of posts: 9,892

About Me

Human. Being.

Journal Archives

Inslee's Washington state Ranked Number One

From US News and World Report

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/washington

https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/q6Hq6_VukvpnnsK_Of6KVQ--~B/aD0xMDgwO3c9MTA4MDtzbT0xO2FwcGlkPXl0YWNoeW9u/

Been drinkin' and thinkin' about Game of Thrones' finale. I loved it. Here's why.

Just thought I'd put this out there, for better or worse...

Game of Thrones' ending is what life actually is -- not everyone gets exactly what they want for all their suffering, but everyone gets equality of free will and peace through compromise.

Expecting storybook ending, or one of "blood, drama and tears" is a child's view of story endings. Life isn't neatly wrapped up as are stories for children, and neither is the future. Adults realize that the best stories help them cope with life.

GOT's ending shows that the Game of Thrones was one of blood revenge for previous wrongs, crimes and betrayals, and Loyalty as the highest good. GOT showed the morality of old world kingdoms, even of those who wanted to "liberate" good people who'd follow them.

Drogon melted the symbol of all that.

The finale made sure the following were resolved from old testament-style "justice" to new testament-style mercy and forgiveness:

1. What Danaerys' told Jon Snow of the future -- her idea of "liberation" by death for "good people" who "don't get to choose" -- her destruction of Kings' Landing was the 'tell.'

2. The deaths of all the revenge driven leaders, who lived by the "Game" ended their game.

3. The decision that no more leaders existed by accident of birth but by the free will decisions of representatives of The People created a transition away from 'the game.'

4. Tyrion's claim that powerful stories never die, and that Bran had the best story and knowledge of the kingdoms, reassured that visionary leadership can guide power.

It was Bran who knew that free will had to rule at the end. Because Bran knew freedom across the kingdoms would have to be based on that, my interpretation stands that this ending was best.

The finale made sure to show that the story, "Game of..." history wasn't just old history, or the end of history, but the beginning of a new world herstory of rule by respect for everyone's free will and equality.

Bran's assent to Sansa and Grey Worm was given out of respect their free wills, and a model of keeping peace through compromise. So was Jon Snow's compromise.

The whole "wheel is broken" thing, along with Tyrions's speech about the power of story, were the two keys to understanding how the morality of free will, mercy and forgiveness are better than the "game" morality of force and revenge.

This story, going forward -- of a new, "broken" king who transitions six kingdoms away from the old morality of 'born' leadership -- is a great ending. The real drama of life is governing oneself wisely, not dramatically.

I thought GOT was emotional, powerful, and thoughtful -- Game of Thrones itself was part and parcel of Tyrion's speech about the power of story.

Humans really prefer stories -- lies that tell the truth -- over straight truth. This is what Game of Thrones did.

It's up to the followers of that story to finally "get it."

THE REDACTED MUELLER REPORT IS READ INTO THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD.

I'm spending the next few days listening to this.

The list of names of Russian-based IRA-controlled accounts on Facebook and Twitter,
and the list of Russian organized pro-Trump rallies are particularly galling.

IRA cyberwar units that targeted the Clinton campaign were Russian military units 26165 and 74455.
Over two dozen states were hacked for their election data, and targeted companies handling electronic voting, inserting malware and trojans enabling the GRU to gain access to state and county governments.

"Harm to ongoing matters" are read as labels for some redactions on the report pages.

While Amazon offers various print editions of the redacted report,
and while some here might doubt that DU needs it, I still it's important that that our party has attempted to make public any version of the Mueller Report for The People's official record.

FWIW, until the unredacted Mueller Report comes out,
we DU members have some record of our party's public congressional reading.

" I'm Joe Biden and I'm Jill's Husband" -- Biden's Speech In Philadelphia Today

Alabama passed it. Alabama's gonna pay for it -- more than it does for its 6,000 foster children.



[Alabama] paid the ACLU and Planned Parenthood $1.7 million dollars in 2016, after the legislature passed a law requiring abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges. This requirement was struck down as unconstitutional.

“Legislators in Alabama have wasted millions of dollars on trying to get involved in a woman’s personal healthcare decisions. They stand to lose millions more if they pass this patently unconstitutional attempt to ban abortion,” said Dillon Nettles, policy analyst for the ACLU of Alabama.


https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/aclu-alabama-responds-possible-abortion-ban-bill?redirect=news/aclu-alabama-responds-possible-abortion-ban-bill

Georgia, Ohio, Kentucky and Mississippi passed fetal heartbeat laws this year, banning abortions at around 6 weeks, before many women know they are pregnant.

Similar motions have been introduced in Florida, Louisiana, South Carolina, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, West Virginia, Missouri and Tennessee, the pro-choice Guttmacher Institute notes.

Why it matters: Supreme Court rulings have been cited to allow abortions up to 24 weeks during pregnancy when the fetus is not viable — or when a woman's health or life is at risk.

But conservatives have been advancing much more restrictive policies in the past few years, hoping to spark a fresh Supreme Court case now that Justice Brett Kavanaugh has replaced Anthony Kennedy.

These are the likely arenas for appeals.

Thank you, Utah Phillips. Now, who's going to surround their buildings and homes.

“The earth is not dying, it is being killed, and those who are killing it have names and addresses.” – Utah Phillips

Jordan Engels' map is on the Decolonial Atlas site:

This map is a response to the pervasive myth that we can stop climate change if we just modify our personal behavior and buy more green products. Whether or not we separate our recycling, these corporations will go on trashing the planet unless we stop them. The key decision-makers at these companies have the privilege of relative anonymity, and with this map, we’re trying to pull back that veil and call them out. These guys should feel the same personal responsibility for saving the planet that we all feel.


https://decolonialatlas.wordpress.com/2019/04/27/names-and-locations-of-the-top-100-people-killing-the-planet/

The world's 100 top Earth killers, by name and location.




These 32 are in North America.

?w=723

18 are in Europe.

?w=723

Google Images shows map variations from other sites.

What Do Rural Voters Here Think of Sanders' and Warren's Positions?

This is about more than Iowa, where Dems are campaigning.

It's not about public lands, but farm lands. But their demonstration of care bodes well for those with public land issues, too.

Not being a rural voter myself, I think these ideas seem to show our candidates listening and giving constructive thought to the needs of rural voters.

Which is a damn sight better than anything they've gotten from Trump.

What say you?

For years, an ever-shrinking number of companies has hoovered up more and more control over our food. Amazon and Walmart are slowly taking over the regional grocery industry; Heinz and Kraft are now one company. At the base of the food chain, farmers may face the most tightly consolidated set of oligopolies of all: a handful of seed and pesticide companies (like Bayer, which took over Monsanto) that sell them what they need to grow crops, and another few that buy their crops and livestock. Caught between a few input providers and a few buyers, the region’s farmers have been struggling for years.

Sanders’ rural package also includes a remedy that hearkens back to the New Deal era: a proposal to help farmers of big commodity crops like corn and soybeans coordinate planting decisions to avoid chronic overproduction. This policy is known as supply management. He would reestablish a national grain reserve, a lapsed New Deal institution that collected excess crops in bountiful years to keep prices from plunging, and release them in bad years to avoid shortages (a notion that, as Sanders points out, makes lots of sense in an era of climate chaos).


Harvard Law professor Warren penned an influential article calling for the establishment of a federal commission designed to “eliminate the hidden tricks and traps” that banks and other lenders use to ensnare consumers ... The idea caught on among the Congressional creators of the the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, and in 2011, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau debuted—and has been under assault by Wall Street-aligned Congressional Republicans and later the Trump administration ever since.

The new CAP paper calls for an Independent Farmer Protection Bureau, “modeled after the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.” The IFPB would “investigate and stop abuses of market power; protect farmers’ contract rights …; combat anti-competitive practices in seed and other input markets”—and even have the power to “review and block mergers in markets that affect farmers.” And it would give debt-laden poultry and hog farmers, many of whom currently toil under contracts favorable to enormous meat companies who buy their animals, a federal watchdog to protect them from abuses.


“It looks like the Dems are really searching for a platform for rural America,” says Joe Maxwell, a Missouri hog farmer and executive director of the Organization for Competitive Markets, a farmer-led group that organizes against corporate control of agriculture. Maxwell is a savvy former politician in his own right—he’s a former state representative, senator, and lieutenant governor in his home state.


“We and others have been working hard to get these conversations into the public discourse for years,” Maxwell says. “And now they’re clearly taking on a life of their own.”


https://www.motherjones.com/food/2019/05/how-can-dems-win-back-rural-america-bernie-sanders-and-elizabeth-warren-agree-on-the-answer/

(photo from the USDA)

Bill Maher and Jay Inslee On Making Trump A Blip In History

The Best Democratic Candidate for President Both Campaigns and Governs



Jay Inslee is THE least recognized progressive of the Democratic candidates. Yet his state is among the top progressive states in the nation.

Washington consistently ranks among the best for life expectancy and low unemployment.[3] Along with Colorado, Washington was one of the first to legalize medicinal and recreational cannabis, was among the first thirty-six states to legalize same-sex marriage, doing so in 2012.

Washington was one of only four U.S. states to have been providing legal abortions on request before the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade loosened federal abortion laws.

Similarly, Washington voters approved a 2008 referendum on legalization of physician-assisted suicide, and is currently only one of five states, along with Oregon, California, Colorado and Vermont, as well as the District of Columbia to have legalized the practice.

The state is also one of eight in the country to have criminalized the sale, possession and transfer of bump stocks, with California, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Maryland, and Massachusetts also having banned these devices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_(state)

Inslee just signed new bills protecting orcas, salmon and other coastline ecosystems.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/gov-inslee-signs-range-of-bills-aimed-at-helping-endangered-orcas/?fbclid=IwAR16Wek2u2dF2-vFvgqYabmWQwj0ZdgbE-BMoZSPYoaRbGVqH3ox0jLzMts



Other important parts include improving the state’s ability to enforce permit requirements for work that hardens shorelines, such as by installing bulkheads near homes, and making vessels stay farther away from orcas and go slower when they’re near them.

“These bills are helping to improve the ecosystems that sustain both salmon and orcas, quiet the waters in which the orcas hunt and provide them more prey,” Inslee said as he signed the bills in Olympia. “While there will be more to do next session, these bills give me hope that we can protect these iconic species for decades to come.”

The legislation grew out of recommendations made by Inslee’s orca recovery task force last fall. The orcas that return every year to the waters between Washington and British Columbia are struggling against toxins that accumulate in their blubber, vessel noise that interferes with their hunting, and, most seriously, a dearth of chinook salmon, their preferred prey. There are just 75 of the killer whales left, and researchers say they’re on the verge of extinction.



Washington State's Department of Ecology, created in February 1970, was the first governmental agency in the US devoted to environmental protection, even predating the US Environmental Protection Agency.

The Department Director is appointed by the Governor and subject to confirmation by the state Senate.

Washington, the eighteenth largest state in the U.S. and second most populous state on the West Coast, shows more scalable programs for fighting climate change than most other states.

Governor Inslee's recent signings undegird his climate change initiatives for clean (not renewable) energy independence for Washington. He's an executive focused on systems that work together, as the cursory map below shows.

Others Talk, Jay Inslee Acts -- Signs More Environmental Protection Bills

Governor Jay Inslee does it again!

Jay Inslee is THE least recognized progressive of the Democratic candidates, and yet his state is among THE most progressive in the nation.

Washington is one of the wealthiest and most socially progressive states in the country. The state consistently ranks among the best for life expectancy and low unemployment.[3] Along with Colorado, Washington was one of the first to legalize medicinal and recreational cannabis, was among the first thirty-six states to legalize same-sex marriage, doing so in 2012.

Washington was one of only four U.S. states to have been providing legal abortions on request before the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade loosened federal abortion laws.

Similarly, Washington voters approved a 2008 referendum on legalization of physician-assisted suicide, and is currently only one of five states, along with Oregon, California, Colorado and Vermont, as well as the District of Columbia to have legalized the practice.

The state is also one of eight in the country to have criminalized the sale, possession and transfer of bump stocks, with California, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Maryland, and Massachusetts also having banned these devices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_(state)

From the Seattle Times

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/gov-inslee-signs-range-of-bills-aimed-at-helping-endangered-orcas/?fbclid=IwAR16Wek2u2dF2-vFvgqYabmWQwj0ZdgbE-BMoZSPYoaRbGVqH3ox0jLzMts



Other important parts include improving the state’s ability to enforce permit requirements for work that hardens shorelines, such as by installing bulkheads near homes, and making vessels stay farther away from orcas and go slower when they’re near them.

“These bills are helping to improve the ecosystems that sustain both salmon and orcas, quiet the waters in which the orcas hunt and provide them more prey,” Inslee said as he signed the bills in Olympia. “While there will be more to do next session, these bills give me hope that we can protect these iconic species for decades to come.”

The legislation grew out of recommendations made by Inslee’s orca recovery task force last fall. The orcas that return every year to the waters between Washington and British Columbia are struggling against toxins that accumulate in their blubber, vessel noise that interferes with their hunting, and, most seriously, a dearth of chinook salmon, their preferred prey. There are just 75 of the killer whales left, and researchers say they’re on the verge of extinction.



Washington State's Department of Ecology, created in February 1970, was the first governmental agency in the US devoted to environmental protection, even predating the US Environmental Protection Agency.

The Department Director is appointed by the Governor and subject to confirmation by the state Senate.

Washington, the eighteenth largest state in the U.S. and second most populous state on the West Coast, shows more scalable programs for fighting climate change than most other states.

Hey, DU? Keep checking Jay Inslee out. He's a focused executive with scalable national plans, and not just for climate change problems.

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