HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » SunSeeker » Journal
Page: 1

SunSeeker

Profile Information

Gender: Do not display
Home country: USA
Current location: Southern California
Member since: Sun Mar 20, 2011, 12:05 PM
Number of posts: 45,335

Journal Archives

The Atlantic: Biden was Right

The president made a difficult but necessary choice.

By Daniel Silverberg

In 2017, I arrived at Kabul’s Hamid Karzai Airport as part of a congressional staff delegation. Even though the U.S. embassy stood a mere four miles away, safety concerns necessitated our helicoptering from a recently constructed multimillion-dollar transit facility instead of traveling by road. As we flew over Kabul, I realized that the Afghan security forces, backed by thousands of U.S. personnel, could not even secure the heart of Afghanistan’s capital.

Kabul was not lost yesterday; the United States and our Afghan partners never truly had control of the country, nor of its capital. Once the Taliban had secured an agreement that the United States would be pulling out and that forces would be reduced to minimal numbers before Joe Biden’s presidency began, they merely had to wait.

The dozens of congressional briefings I attended over 14 years of working on Capitol Hill underscored this dynamic. The intelligence community would commence each briefing with a stark assessment regarding the fragility of conditions in Afghanistan. Senior defense leaders would then provide a far more optimistic view, one that often gave a sense of progress, despite the Herculean challenge with which they had been tasked.  

...
Some critics also argue that the United States should have preserved a residual force in Afghanistan, much as we have in South Korea. There are any number of ungoverned spaces today, however, which pose as great a threat, if not greater, to U.S. security as Afghanistan, and few are calling for U.S. deployments to those areas. There is a cost—financial and military—to tying forces down in a project that was ultimately doomed to fail.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/08/biden-afghanistan-taliban-reality/619776/

Stabbing at Proud Boys anti-vaccine protest at LA City Hall

A man was stabbed outside L.A. City Hall after a fight broke out during an anti-vaccine protest on Saturday, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

The protest was held to push back against the recent vaccine mandates and requirements, according to the Los Angeles Times.

LAPD responded to the scene where a man was stabbed. The victim was treated by the Los Angeles Fire Department and remains in serious condition, according to the LAPD.

https://ktla.com/news/local-news/1-stabbed-at-los-angeles-city-hall-protest-lapd/




Lots of posts from people furious that LAPD apparently stood there and let this violence happen:

https://twitter.com/PplsCityCouncil/status/1426669000608468994?s=20

There Is a Problem With California's Recall. It's Unconstitutional.

The most basic principles of democracy are that the candidate who gets the most votes is elected and that every voter gets an equal say in an election’s outcome. The California system for voting in a recall election violates these principles and should be declared unconstitutional.

Unless that happens, on Sept. 14, voters will be asked to cast a ballot on two questions: Should Gov. Gavin Newsom be recalled and removed from office? If so, which of the candidates on the ballot should replace him?

The first question is decided by a majority vote. If a majority favors recalling Mr. Newsom, he is removed from office. But the latter question is decided by a plurality, and whichever candidate gets the most votes, even if it is much less than a majority, becomes the next governor. Critically, Mr. Newsom is not on the ballot for the second question. By conducting the recall election in this way, Mr. Newsom can receive far more votes than any other candidate but still be removed from office. Many focus on how unfair this structure is to the governor, but consider instead how unfair it is to the voters who support him.

Imagine that 10 million people vote in the recall election and 5,000,001 vote to remove Mr. Newsom, while 4,999,999 vote to keep him in office. He will then be removed and the new governor will be whichever candidate gets the most votes on the second question. In a recent poll, the talk show host Larry Elder was leading with 18 percent among the nearly 50 candidates on the ballot. With 10 million people voting, Mr. Elder would receive the votes of 1.8 million people. Mr. Newsom would have the support of almost three times as many voters, but Mr. Elder would become the governor.
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/11/opinion/california-recall-election-newsom.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

[Great legal opinion piece written by Erwin Chemerinsky and Aaron S. Edlin. Chemerinsky is the dean of the School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of the forthcoming book “Presumed Guilty: How the Supreme Court Empowered the Police and Subverted Civil Rights.” Mr. Edlin is a professor of law and of economics at Berkeley.]

Go to Page: 1