HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » TexasTowelie » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 3933 Next »

TexasTowelie

Profile Information

Gender: Male
Hometown: Texas
Home country: United States
Current location: Red Hell Texas
Member since: Sun Aug 14, 2011, 03:57 AM
Number of posts: 69,391

About Me

Middle-aged white guy who believes in justice and equality for all. Math and computer analyst with additional 21st century jack-of-all-trades skills. I'm a stud, not a dud!

Journal Archives

Donald Trump Jr., Sarah Sanders warn of Big Tech, 'socialist' Democrats at Doral conservative fest

DORAL — Former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders warned conservatives that “real chaos” would be unleashed if the Democrats should be allowed to take the Senate and flip the presidency.

“If we don’t reelect President Donald Trump and we allow Democrats to take over the House and take over the Senate, then we’re going to see real chaos in this country,” said Sanders at a prayer breakfast on Saturday.

Sanders, now at Fox News, spoke on the closing day of the conservative American Priority conference at the Trump National Doral. Donald Trump, Jr., and former 2016 Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski also spoke at the three-day conference.

“It is absolutely wild some of the ideas that Democrats are throwing out right now,” she said.

Read more: https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/20191014/donald-trump-jr-sarah-sanders-warn-of-big-tech-rsquosocialistrsquo-democrats-at-doral-conservative-fest

Florida Democrats focus on voter registration as most critical need for 2020

If Florida Democrats could sum up the state party’s early 2020 strategy in three words, they would be registration, registration, registration.

During the party’s convention this weekend in Orlando, leaders stressed they have fixed past errors in their voter-registration strategy and are busy building a more Democratic-friendly electorate more than a year from Election Day.

“I think we are going to win by putting our head down and doing the work,” said Juan Peñalosa, executive director of the Florida Democratic Party.

“What we have done in the past is starting too late. … We haven’t built the electorate in time for the election,” he added.

Read more: https://www.orlandoweekly.com/Blogs/archives/2019/10/13/florida-democrats-focus-on-voter-registration-as-most-critical-need-for-2020

Crippled by Low Wages, Miami Janitors File Labor Charges Against Cleaning Contractor

Miriam Alba is tired of being tired. An immigrant from Nicaragua, she wears her exhaustion like a uniform, juggling multiple jobs to keep a roof over her head and help put her granddaughter through college. For years, Alba's working days have been filled with cooking and cleaning homes, leaving little time for sleep. The few snatches of shut-eye she did get, about three or four hours at most, came after a night shift of janitorial work at CIC Miami, a large co-working space in eastern Allapattah, right next to the interstate.

Alba had always handled her janitorial work at CIC with pride, if unhappily at times: The pay, $8.46 an hour, was poor, and part-time workers like her didn't receive any benefits. But it wasn't until she began organizing for higher wages that she finally decided to leave. CIC outsources its cleaning needs to Coastal Building Management (CBM) and its property management to the real-estate service company Cushman & Wakefield. Last month, Alba was at the center of pending unfair labor practice charges filed against both companies. Since going public with her support for a union, she says she's been surveilled and threatened. CBM denies those charges. Cushman & Wakefield did not return messages from New Times seeking comment.

While Miami's booming real-estate market and nascent startup scene continue to draw attention for their steady growth, it's South Florida's low-wage service sector that's actually created the most new jobs in recent years. That includes janitorial workers such as Alba, who was deflated to learn just how bad janitors in Miami had it. When factoring in the cost of living, the Miami metro area ranks third-worst in the nation for median janitorial wages and dead last in Florida, according to an analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Studies by the workers' union Service Employees International Union (SEIU). On average, janitors working in areas as expensive as Miami make more than $3.50 more per hour than Miami janitors.

Put differently, while the industries that help build, sell, rent, and manage Miami properties continue to blossom, work standards for the people who clean them remain virtually stagnant: SEIU estimates that real annual earnings in the janitorial industry have grown by just 1.6 percent in the past two decades. The poor growth is, in part, a product of a race to the bottom on wages among cleaning contractors, to whom office buildings have happily outsourced their cleaning work, according to Ana Tinsly, a spokeswoman for the Florida division of 32BJ SEIU.

https://twitter.com/32BJFlorida/status/1172628745175351296

Read more: https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/miami-janitors-file-labor-charges-against-south-florida-cleaning-contractor-11289040

Lessons of Beto O'Rourke and "Joker": Mental illness is not the cause of gun violence

The hit movie “Joker,” released in theaters last week, unintentionally offers an object lesson in why society should stop vilifying mental illness — and why we need far more vigorous gun control.

Both points became evident in a single scene that perfectly captures both the movie’s ambiguous views on mental illness and those of American society overall. Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) is a party clown who has just been assaulted by a gang and is commiserating with one of his co-workers, who offers him a gun. Fleck is initially horrified by the idea: He is mentally ill and legally isn’t permitted to own a firearm. Eventually he agrees to accept the weapon, an act that single-handedly turns him toward the path of violence and thereby sets the plot in motion.

One could write an entire article deconstructing “Joker’s” sometimes sympathetic and insightful, sometimes derogatory depiction of mental illness. (My full review can be read here.) Yet the more troubling subtext of this scene is that it never questions the idea that people who are mentally ill should be treated differently when it comes to guns. It is the weapon that allows Arthur’s innate capacity for violence to be realized — a capacity one the movie explicitly links to his mental illness, as well as society’s mistreatment of him.

In other words, a viewer could easily watch “Joker” and walk away with the same conclusion proclaimed by President Trump in August after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio left 31 people dead: “Mental illness and hatred pull the trigger, not the gun.”

Read more: https://www.salon.com/2019/10/14/lessons-of-beto-orourke-and-joker-mental-illness-is-not-the-cause-of-gun-violence/

Lessons of Beto O'Rourke and "Joker": Mental illness is not the cause of gun violence

The hit movie “Joker,” released in theaters last week, unintentionally offers an object lesson in why society should stop vilifying mental illness — and why we need far more vigorous gun control.

Both points became evident in a single scene that perfectly captures both the movie’s ambiguous views on mental illness and those of American society overall. Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) is a party clown who has just been assaulted by a gang and is commiserating with one of his co-workers, who offers him a gun. Fleck is initially horrified by the idea: He is mentally ill and legally isn’t permitted to own a firearm. Eventually he agrees to accept the weapon, an act that single-handedly turns him toward the path of violence and thereby sets the plot in motion.

One could write an entire article deconstructing “Joker’s” sometimes sympathetic and insightful, sometimes derogatory depiction of mental illness. (My full review can be read here.) Yet the more troubling subtext of this scene is that it never questions the idea that people who are mentally ill should be treated differently when it comes to guns. It is the weapon that allows Arthur’s innate capacity for violence to be realized — a capacity one the movie explicitly links to his mental illness, as well as society’s mistreatment of him.

In other words, a viewer could easily watch “Joker” and walk away with the same conclusion proclaimed by President Trump in August after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio left 31 people dead: “Mental illness and hatred pull the trigger, not the gun.”

Read more: https://www.salon.com/2019/10/14/lessons-of-beto-orourke-and-joker-mental-illness-is-not-the-cause-of-gun-violence/

Florida man calls 911 to say roommate 'stole his weed'

A Florida man who kept calling 911 about a roommate who “stole his weed” was asked to please top calling 911, according to the Pasco County Sheriff’s Department.

In a video posted to the sheriff’s department Twitter page, Sheriff’s Deputy N. Zalva said, “The guy’s calling in saying his roommate stole his weed, $20 worth and he’s upset and he keeps calling 911, so I had to give him a call and tell him to stop calling about his weed.”

The video was part of a Tweet Along held Saturday night.

Deputy Zalva did a followup video in which he said, "I called him to let him know not to call the sheriff’s office to report his drugs. He started to freak out a little on the phone, and then hung up on me shortly after.”

Read more: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/florida/os-ne-florida-man-calls-911-roommate-stole-his-weed-20191014-vcadddljjva4dgtz2dzlniodrq-story.html

Hoping to eliminate distractions, Mike Leach introduces social media ban for Washington State player

Hoping to eliminate distractions, Mike Leach introduces social media ban for Washington State players


TEMPE, Ariz. – Washington State football players, usually avid social media users, have been noticeably quiet on Twitter and Instagram since their 38-13 loss to Utah two weeks ago.

It’s not a coincidence.

After the Cougars’ 25-point loss in Salt Lake City, coach Mike Leach put the kibosh on his players’ social media accounts, banning them from using Twitter, Instagram and other platforms for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Leach didn’t bring up his social media ban at any point during practices or press conferences leading up to Saturday’s 38-34 loss at Arizona State, but the Pac-12 Networks made note of it in their pregame show, and the WSU coach affirmed it afterward.

“I think we entertain too many distractions,” Leach said, “and if I had it to do over again, I would’ve done it when we started camp. But no, I think we entertain too many distractions. I think we’re a little too distracted right now, but I think there is a team-wide determination to be less distracted.”

Read more: https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2019/oct/12/hoping-to-eliminate-distractions-mike-leach-introd/
(Spokane Spokesman-Review)

Spokane Public Schools approves three-year contract with union, despite mixed feelings among teacher

The Spokane school board last night approved a new three-year contract that adds a 1 percent pay raise for teachers and includes language that could allow librarians who have been laid off to return to their positions in the 2020-21 school year.

"It's a very fiscally responsible way to get us on the right path to move forward next year out of this emergency," says Spokane Public Schools board member Michael Wiser.

The board passed the contract unanimously, a day after the teachers union, the Spokane Education Association, narrowly ratified the contract with only 53.5 percent of teachers and classified staff voting "yes."

Jeremy Shay, SEA president, says the vote was narrow because members are "stressed out" about how the budget cuts in schools have impacted classrooms already this year. Those concerns include larger class sizes, staff safety and the reductions in custodians. He's heard that many classrooms are getting cleaned twice a week instead of every night, leaving teachers to sometimes clean up the mess.

Read more: https://www.inlander.com/spokane/spokane-public-schools-approves-three-year-contract-with-union-despite-mixed-feelings-among-teachers/Content?oid=18425988
(Spokane Inlander)

Follow-up: Former Idaho GOP chairman pleads guilty to stalking, unlawful entry

To resolve five pending criminal cases, former Idaho Republican Party Chairman Jonathan Parker has proposed a “global settlement” in which he pleads guilty to two counts: stalking his estranged wife and unlawfully entering the home of a female colleague.

Parker’s attorney, Randall Barnum, asked during a court appearance Monday that under the plea agreement, Parker would receive probation, a five-year no-contact order with his soon-to-be ex-wife and the female colleague whose home he entered, and, if so ordered, restitution. Parker also will undergo a psychological evaluation.

If the judge does not accept the plea agreement, Parker faces up to five years in prison and/or up to a $10,000 fine on the felony stalking charge and up to six months in jail and/or up to a $1,000 fine on the misdemeanor unlawful entry charge.

His sentencing is set for 10:45 a.m. Dec. 9 at the Ada County Courthouse.

Read more: https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/local/crime/article235892832.html

Previous thread:
Judge issues 2nd no-contact order in cases involving ex-GOP head Jonathan Parker

https://www.democraticunderground.com/1048899

Idaho billionaire announces another $500K to fight debt collection firm led by GOP activist

Idaho’s richest man, Frank VanderSloot, and his wife, Belinda, announced on Tuesday they would double their original donation of $500,000 to defend eastern Idahoans from a debt collection agency with ties to a state representative and prominent libertarian lawyer.

In April, VanderSloot created the legal defense fund, called Idaho Medical Debt, to fight on behalf of clients of the debt collection agency Medical Recovery Services, or MRS, of Idaho Falls. The firm charges debtors excessive supplemental attorneys’ fees, which it has said are necessary to discourage people from evading collection, according to a report published by East Idaho News, a publication founded by Frank VanderSloot.

“These guys use tactics to run up the bill,” VanderSloot previously told the Idaho Statesman in a phone interview.

The faces of Medical Recovery Services are prominent figures in the Idaho Republican Party’s libertarian wing: Rep. Bryan Zollinger, an Idaho Falls Republican, and Bryan Smith, a lawyer who has run for office and who argued in the Idaho Supreme Court against Medicaid expansion on behalf of the Idaho Freedom Foundation.

Read more: https://magicvalley.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/idaho-billionaire-announces-another-k-to-fight-debt-collection-firm/article_d2633743-079f-530f-ac54-584ac4ab24af.html
Go to Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 3933 Next »