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Inkfreak

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Gender: Male
Member since: Sat Jun 9, 2012, 08:30 AM
Number of posts: 1,695

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Fist Bumps Relay 90% Less Germs Than Handshakes

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Ditching handshakes in favor of more informal fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a study released on Monday.

The study in the American Journal of Infection Control found that fist bumps, where two people briefly press the top of their closed fists together, transferred about 90 percent less bacteria than handshakes.

"People rarely think about the health implications of shaking hands," Dave Whitworth, a biologist at Aberystwyth University in the United Kingdom who co-authored the study, said in a statement.

"If the general public could be encouraged to fist bump, there is genuine potential to reduce the spread of infectious diseases," he said.


Link: http://mobile.reuters.com/article/oddlyEnoughNews/idUSKBN0FX1Q820140729?irpc=932

Standard procedure for me at work. I go in a lot of prisons & mental health facilities. Inmates & "clients" are always trying to shake hands. I usually carry tools or paperwork in my hands so I can't. But when I get caught off guard, I always throw up the fist.

Meeting people in casual circumstances is a little different. I tend to just shake hands to avoid awkwardness. I do hate cold, clammy hands though. Gross.

This Kid Made An App That Exposes Sellout Politicians

By Hannah Ewens Jul 7 2014


With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it's pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of health care, fossil fuels, and other very important issues from one week to the next.

But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plug-in that operates under the motto "Some are red. Some are blue. All are green." The plugin aims "to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress." It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it's actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a breakdown of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician's name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.

I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics, and what he calls the "money stories" behind what you read in the news.


How does Greenhouse work?
It works by highlighting the name of any member of Congress on any website, and when you hover over these names a little box appears that shows detailed contribution information with amounts and where those amounts have come from. It’s basically a list of the top-ten industries from which they receive their money. My goal was to create something that promotes transparency. It would be great if people used it on sites where they’re reading about politics every day. For example, if you’re reading a piece on Congress votes for energy policy, you might see that a sponsor has received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the oil and gas industry. I like to say that Greenhouse allows people to see the money story behind the news story.


What do you hope from Greenhouse?
I just want it to educate people because that’s really the first step toward a solution. That’s exactly why I designed Greenhouse with simplicity in mind, so that everyone—even kids—are able to understand it. In terms of whether Greenhouse will solve this issue—well, education is the first step. I really do believe that increased transparency will help fix the problem. Easy access to data empowers voters to make better decisions. Once people are informed, they will reject elected officials who are motived by money instead of principles. But for now, I’ll leave the solution to others.


Smart kid and a neat tool. The full interview is at this link: http://www.vice.com/read/greenhouse-app-hannah-ewens-nick-rubin-201

I found his website where you can download the plugins. http://allaregreen.us
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