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saidsimplesimon

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Member since: Sun Sep 16, 2012, 12:48 PM
Number of posts: 7,279

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Nuclear power technologies, costs and profit solutions are not enough

I was very impressed by the interest of DU members related to Bill Gates’ announcement of support for nuclear power. One poster appeared to have an extensive scientific understanding of the topic. Let me say up front, I am no expert.

My position as an activist has always been related to known issues related to safety and regulation, and water resources required to mine and process the uranium, water required to operate the nuclear plants, and disposal of radioactive waste material.

If there are scientific sources that have addressed my concerns, I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has on reading sources. My only expert source would be material published by Union of Concerned Scientists. The entire topic is covered in detail at their website. I did not find any detail material related to water resource requirement study per plant and its impact on water use for farming and consumption.

I did not save a link to the blog. Anyone who wants to share a link, please do include a snippet of the material that might help in forming a consensus. I did not comment in the other blog.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power/cost-nuclear-power/retirements#.XFG37PZFy70

Nuclear power is the single largest source of low-carbon electricity in the United States. In 2017, some 99 nuclear reactors operating at 60 plants provided 20 percent of the nation’s electricity.

But the numbers are changing. Cheap natural gas and renewable energy, diminished demand, rising operational costs, and safety and performance problems are all threatening the profitability of nuclear power plants—and increasing the likelihood that reactors might close.

If natural gas or coal replaces them, emissions will rise—and our ability to fight climate change will become that much weaker.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power?_ga=2.8477877.1011517464.1548859310-1015979512.1548859310#.XFG6VfZFy70

Nuclear accidents happen

Floods, fires, and earthquakes can combine with aging facilities and error-prone humans in devastating ways. Adequate understanding of these issues, along with significant safety upgrades and consistent oversight, can help safeguard the US public.
Learn more about preventing nuclear accidents >

Waste should be safely stored

Nuclear fuel emits radiation long after it’s done powering a reactor. Securing a long-term waste repository—and transferring fuel currently held in cooling pools to dry casks—is essential for long-term public safety.

Learn more about handling nuclear waste >

Technology (water based)

Different reactor designs approach these requirements in different ways. About two-thirds of operating US reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the rest are boiling water reactors (BWRs). Both BWRs and PWRs heat ordinary water with nuclear fuel, driving turbines that generate power.

https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-energy/energy-water-use/water-energy-electricity-nuclear#.XFG-tPZFy70

Nuclear power plants generate almost one fifth of the electricity produced in the United States. The nuclear power cycle uses water in three major ways: extracting and processing uranium fuel, producing electricity, impact on fish, and controlling wastes and risks.

How it Works: Water for Nuclear

Nuclear plants as a whole withdraw and consume more water per unit of electricity produced than coal plants using similar cooling technologies because nuclear plants operate at a lower temperature and lower turbine efficiency, and do not lose heat via smokestacks.[2]

Dry cooling is not currently used in nuclear power generation due to safety risks of using dry-cooled technology with nuclear reactors [4] and the high costs of operating large dry-cooling fans. In addition to cooling the steam, nuclear power plants also use water in a way that no other plant does: to keep the reactor core and used fuel rods cool. To avoid potentially catastrophic failure, these systems need to be kept running at all times, even when the plant is closed for refueling.[5]

Fuel extraction

The most common fuel for nuclear power plants is uranium. Processing uranium requires mining, milling, enrichment, and fuel fabrication, all of which use significant quantities of water.

When nuclear plants draw water from natural water sources, fish and other wildlife get caught in the cooling system water intake structures. While this is an issue for all power plants with water-cooled systems, a study completed in 2005 in Southern California indicates that the problem is more acute for nuclear facilities. The study investigated impacts from 11 coastal power plants and estimated that in 2003, a single nuclear plant killed close to 3.5 million fish--32 times more than the combined impact of all of the other plants in the study.[15]

For full disclosure, I support National Resource Defense Council

https://www.nrdc.org/issues/dirty-energy
https://www.nrdc.org/issues/minimize-harm-and-security-risks-nuclear-energy
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Wed Jan 30, 2019, 12:29 PM (1 replies)

Nuclear power technologies, costs and profit solutions are not enough

I was very impressed by the interest of DU members related to Bill Gates’ announcement of support for nuclear power. One poster appeared to have an extensive scientific understanding of the topic. Let me say up front, I am no expert.

My position as an activist has always been related to known issues related to safety and regulation, and water resources required to mine and process the uranium, water required to operate the nuclear plants, and disposal of radioactive waste material.

If there are scientific sources that have addressed my concerns, I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has on reading sources. My only expert source would be material published by Union of Concerned Scientists. The entire topic is covered in detail at their website. I did not find any detail material related to water resource requirement study per plant and its impact on water use for farming and consumption.

I did not save a link to the blog. Anyone who wants to share a link, please do include a snippet of the material that might help in forming a consensus. I did not comment in the other blog.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power/cost-nuclear-power/retirements#.XFG37PZFy70

Nuclear power is the single largest source of low-carbon electricity in the United States. In 2017, some 99 nuclear reactors operating at 60 plants provided 20 percent of the nation’s electricity.

But the numbers are changing. Cheap natural gas and renewable energy, diminished demand, rising operational costs, and safety and performance problems are all threatening the profitability of nuclear power plants—and increasing the likelihood that reactors might close.

If natural gas or coal replaces them, emissions will rise—and our ability to fight climate change will become that much weaker.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power?_ga=2.8477877.1011517464.1548859310-1015979512.1548859310#.XFG6VfZFy70

Nuclear accidents happen

Floods, fires, and earthquakes can combine with aging facilities and error-prone humans in devastating ways. Adequate understanding of these issues, along with significant safety upgrades and consistent oversight, can help safeguard the US public.
Learn more about preventing nuclear accidents >

Waste should be safely stored

Nuclear fuel emits radiation long after it’s done powering a reactor. Securing a long-term waste repository—and transferring fuel currently held in cooling pools to dry casks—is essential for long-term public safety.

Learn more about handling nuclear waste >

Technology (water based)

Different reactor designs approach these requirements in different ways. About two-thirds of operating US reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the rest are boiling water reactors (BWRs). Both BWRs and PWRs heat ordinary water with nuclear fuel, driving turbines that generate power.

https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-energy/energy-water-use/water-energy-electricity-nuclear#.XFG-tPZFy70

Nuclear power plants generate almost one fifth of the electricity produced in the United States. The nuclear power cycle uses water in three major ways: extracting and processing uranium fuel, producing electricity, impact on fish, and controlling wastes and risks.

How it Works: Water for Nuclear

Nuclear plants as a whole withdraw and consume more water per unit of electricity produced than coal plants using similar cooling technologies because nuclear plants operate at a lower temperature and lower turbine efficiency, and do not lose heat via smokestacks.[2]

Dry cooling is not currently used in nuclear power generation due to safety risks of using dry-cooled technology with nuclear reactors [4] and the high costs of operating large dry-cooling fans. In addition to cooling the steam, nuclear power plants also use water in a way that no other plant does: to keep the reactor core and used fuel rods cool. To avoid potentially catastrophic failure, these systems need to be kept running at all times, even when the plant is closed for refueling.[5]

Fuel extraction

The most common fuel for nuclear power plants is uranium. Processing uranium requires mining, milling, enrichment, and fuel fabrication, all of which use significant quantities of water.

When nuclear plants draw water from natural water sources, fish and other wildlife get caught in the cooling system water intake structures. While this is an issue for all power plants with water-cooled systems, a study completed in 2005 in Southern California indicates that the problem is more acute for nuclear facilities. The study investigated impacts from 11 coastal power plants and estimated that in 2003, a single nuclear plant killed close to 3.5 million fish--32 times more than the combined impact of all of the other plants in the study.[15]

For full disclosure, I support National Resource Defense Council

https://www.nrdc.org/issues/dirty-energy
https://www.nrdc.org/issues/minimize-harm-and-security-risks-nuclear-energy
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Wed Jan 30, 2019, 12:27 PM (2 replies)

Nuclear power technologies, costs and profit solutions are not enough

I was very impressed by the interest of DU members related to Bill Gates’ announcement of support for nuclear power. One poster appeared to have an extensive scientific understanding of the topic. Let me say up front, I am no expert.

My position as an activist has always been related to known issues related to safety and regulation, and water resources required to mine and process the uranium, water required to operate the nuclear plants, and disposal of radioactive waste material.

If there are scientific sources that have addressed my concerns, I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has on reading sources. My only expert source would be material published by Union of Concerned Scientists. The entire topic is covered in detail at their website. I did not find any detailed material related to water resource requirement study per plant and its impact or competition on water use for farming and consumption.

I did not save a link to the blog. Anyone who wants to share a link, please do include a snippet of the material that might help in forming a consensus. I did not comment in the other blog.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power/cost-nuclear-power/retirements#.XFG37PZFy70

Nuclear power is the single largest source of low-carbon electricity in the United States. In 2017, some 99 nuclear reactors operating at 60 plants provided 20 percent of the nation’s electricity.
But the numbers are changing. Cheap natural gas and renewable energy, diminished demand, rising operational costs, and safety and performance problems are all threatening the profitability of nuclear power plants—and increasing the likelihood that reactors might close.

If natural gas or coal replaces them, emissions will rise—and our ability to fight climate change will become that much weaker.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power?_ga=2.8477877.1011517464.1548859310-1015979512.1548859310#.XFG6VfZFy70

Nuclear accidents happen

Floods, fires, and earthquakes can combine with aging facilities and error-prone humans in devastating ways. Adequate understanding of these issues, along with significant safety upgrades and consistent oversight, can help safeguard the US public.
Learn more about preventing nuclear accidents >

Waste should be safely stored
Nuclear fuel emits radiation long after it’s done powering a reactor. Securing a long-term waste repository—and transferring fuel currently held in cooling pools to dry casks—is essential for long-term public safety.
Learn more about handling nuclear waste >

Technology (water based)

Different reactor designs approach these requirements in different ways. About two-thirds of operating US reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the rest are boiling water reactors (BWRs). Both BWRs and PWRs heat ordinary water with nuclear fuel, driving turbines that generate power.

https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-energy/energy-water-use/water-energy-electricity-nuclear#.XFG-tPZFy70

Nuclear power plants generate almost one fifth of the electricity produced in the United States. The nuclear power cycle uses water in three major ways: extracting and processing uranium fuel, producing electricity, impact on fish, and controlling wastes and risks.

How it Works: Water for Nuclear

Nuclear plants as a whole withdraw and consume more water per unit of electricity produced than coal plants using similar cooling technologies because nuclear plants operate at a lower temperature and lower turbine efficiency, and do not lose heat via smokestacks.[2]

Dry cooling is not currently used in nuclear power generation due to safety risks of using dry-cooled technology with nuclear reactors [4] and the high costs of operating large dry-cooling fans. In addition to cooling the steam, nuclear power plants also use water in a way that no other plant does: to keep the reactor core and used fuel rods cool. To avoid potentially catastrophic failure, these systems need to be kept running at all times, even when the plant is closed for refueling.[5]

Fuel extraction

The most common fuel for nuclear power plants is uranium. Processing uranium requires mining, milling, enrichment, and fuel fabrication, all of which use significant quantities of water.

When nuclear plants draw water from natural water sources, fish and other wildlife get caught in the cooling system water intake structures. While this is an issue for all power plants with water-cooled systems, a study completed in 2005 in Southern California indicates that the problem is more acute for nuclear facilities. The study investigated impacts from 11 coastal power plants and estimated that in 2003, a single nuclear plant killed close to 3.5 million fish--32 times more than the combined impact of all of the other plants in the study.[15]

For full disclosure, I support National Resource Defense Council.

https://www.nrdc.org/issues/dirty-energy
https://www.nrdc.org/issues/minimize-harm-and-security-risks-nuclear-energy
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Wed Jan 30, 2019, 12:12 PM (0 replies)

Nuclear power technologies, costs and profit solutions are not enough

I was very impressed by the interest of DU members related to Bill Gates’ announcement of support for nuclear power. One poster appeared to have an extensive scientific understanding of the topic. Let me say up front, I am no expert.

My position as an activist has always been related to known issues related to safety and regulation, and water resources required to mine and process the uranium, water required to operate the nuclear plants, and disposal of radioactive waste material.

If there are scientific sources that have addressed my concerns, I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has on reading sources. My only expert source would be material published by Union of Concerned Scientists. The entire topic is covered in detail at their website. I did not find any detailed material related to water resource requirement study per plant and its impact or competition on water use for farming and consumption.

I did not save a link to the blog. Anyone who wants to share a link, please do include a snippet of the material that might help in forming a consensus. I did not comment in the other blog.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power/cost-nuclear-power/retirements#.XFG37PZFy70

Nuclear power is the single largest source of low-carbon electricity in the United States. In 2017, some 99 nuclear reactors operating at 60 plants provided 20 percent of the nation’s electricity.
But the numbers are changing. Cheap natural gas and renewable energy, diminished demand, rising operational costs, and safety and performance problems are all threatening the profitability of nuclear power plants—and increasing the likelihood that reactors might close.

If natural gas or coal replaces them, emissions will rise—and our ability to fight climate change will become that much weaker.

https://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-power?_ga=2.8477877.1011517464.1548859310-1015979512.1548859310#.XFG6VfZFy70

Nuclear accidents happen

Floods, fires, and earthquakes can combine with aging facilities and error-prone humans in devastating ways. Adequate understanding of these issues, along with significant safety upgrades and consistent oversight, can help safeguard the US public.
Learn more about preventing nuclear accidents >

Waste should be safely stored
Nuclear fuel emits radiation long after it’s done powering a reactor. Securing a long-term waste repository—and transferring fuel currently held in cooling pools to dry casks—is essential for long-term public safety.
Learn more about handling nuclear waste >

Technology (water based)

Different reactor designs approach these requirements in different ways. About two-thirds of operating US reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the rest are boiling water reactors (BWRs). Both BWRs and PWRs heat ordinary water with nuclear fuel, driving turbines that generate power.

https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-energy/energy-water-use/water-energy-electricity-nuclear#.XFG-tPZFy70

Nuclear power plants generate almost one fifth of the electricity produced in the United States. The nuclear power cycle uses water in three major ways: extracting and processing uranium fuel, producing electricity, impact on fish, and controlling wastes and risks.

How it Works: Water for Nuclear

Nuclear plants as a whole withdraw and consume more water per unit of electricity produced than coal plants using similar cooling technologies because nuclear plants operate at a lower temperature and lower turbine efficiency, and do not lose heat via smokestacks.[2]

Dry cooling is not currently used in nuclear power generation due to safety risks of using dry-cooled technology with nuclear reactors [4] and the high costs of operating large dry-cooling fans. In addition to cooling the steam, nuclear power plants also use water in a way that no other plant does: to keep the reactor core and used fuel rods cool. To avoid potentially catastrophic failure, these systems need to be kept running at all times, even when the plant is closed for refueling.[5]

Fuel extraction

The most common fuel for nuclear power plants is uranium. Processing uranium requires mining, milling, enrichment, and fuel fabrication, all of which use significant quantities of water.

When nuclear plants draw water from natural water sources, fish and other wildlife get caught in the cooling system water intake structures. While this is an issue for all power plants with water-cooled systems, a study completed in 2005 in Southern California indicates that the problem is more acute for nuclear facilities. The study investigated impacts from 11 coastal power plants and estimated that in 2003, a single nuclear plant killed close to 3.5 million fish--32 times more than the combined impact of all of the other plants in the study.[15]

For full disclosure, I support National Resource Defense Council.

https://www.nrdc.org/issues/dirty-energy
https://www.nrdc.org/issues/minimize-harm-and-security-risks-nuclear-energy
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Wed Jan 30, 2019, 12:09 PM (0 replies)

The Divine Ms. M

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Thu Jan 24, 2019, 12:46 PM (6 replies)

Foreign bank appealing to SCOTUS, Deutsche or Danske?

Reading DU diaries this morning, I think a couple of DU members may have published diaries that when merged may solve the mystery related to the SCOTUS appeal of Mueller's investigation.

https://www.democraticunderground.com/10142249727

Source: NBC News

WASHINGTON — An unidentified foreign government is asking the Supreme Court to get involved in a case that may be part of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

The justices on Tuesday granted the government's request to file a censored version of an appeal to the high court in which the country is fighting a grand jury subpoena and a $50,000-a-day fine for not complying with the subpoena.

The appeal doesn't identify the country, a company it controls or even the lawyers who are representing it. But the appeal says the justices should make clear that a federal law that generally protects foreign governments from civil lawsuits in the U.S. also shields them in criminal cases.

The justices had previously refused to block the subpoena and fine on an emergency basis.
... snip ...

The U.S. government has until Feb. 21 to respond to the appeal. An uncensored, sealed version of the appeal also has been filed with the court.

Read more: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna961416

https://www.democraticunderground.com/111684663

Deutsche Bank shares slip on reports of Fed investigation over Danske Bank scandal

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/01/23/shares-in-deutsche-bank-slip-on-reports-of-fed-investigation-over-danske-bank-scandal.html

Spriha Srivastava
Published 29 Mins Ago |Updated 22 Mins Ago

Shares of Deutsche Bank slid more than 1 percent in early trading on reports that the U.S. Federal Reserve is investigating the German lender's role in a money laundering scheme. A report published in Bloomberg, citing sources, said the Fed probe is in very early stages as it examines whether Deutsche Bank's U.S. arm was involved in moving funds out of the Estonian branch of Danske Bank.

Deutsche Bank has been cooperating with the Fed, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday. The German lender, however told CNBC that there were no investigations taking place.

"There are no probes but we have received several requests for information from regulators and law enforcement agencies around the world. It is not surprising at all that the investigating authorities and banks themselves have an interest in the Danske case and the lessons to be learned from it. Deutsche Bank continues to provide information to and cooperate with the investigating agencies," Deutsche Bank told CNBC in an emailed statement on Wednesday.

Danske Bank is being investigated in Denmark, Estonia, Britain and the United States over 200 billion euros ($227 billion) of suspicious payments through its Estonian branch between 2007 and 2015.
(snip)

Posted by saidsimplesimon | Wed Jan 23, 2019, 08:09 AM (4 replies)

Why are there no protests of Republican shutdown?

Following my daily reading routine, I read the article below. I will spend the day trying to create an interest in organizing a protest in DC, in front of the White House.

Do government workers fear retaliation? Are they prohibited from attending or organizing protests?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/opinion/the-shutdown-shows-the-weakness-of-the-resistance/ar-BBSw6BH

The New York Times

The Shutdown Shows the Weakness of the Resistance

By DAVID LEONHARDT 8 hrs ago

The grass-roots progressive movement known as the resistance has had a very good two years. It beat back attempts to take health insurance away from millions of Americans, and it helped defeat a Republican House majority that was enabling President Trump. Neither of those outcomes looked likely when he took office.

But the government shutdown has shown the limits of this new progressive movement. The resistance has had virtually no effect on the politics of the shutdown — and a stronger movement could have a big effect.

When I’ve spoken to people from other countries over the past couple of weeks, they have been shocked that Americans have not begun protesting the shutdown in large numbers. About 800,000 federal workers have now gone almost a month without getting paid. Some are struggling to pay their rent or buy medications. Some have gone to pawn shops to get cash. Major functions of government — airline security, food safety, mortgage processing, farm assistance and so on — have been impaired.

If this were happening in Europe, as Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago told me, people would be pouring into the streets. And yet in the United States, there has been nothing but a few small, scattered rallies.

Instead of lining up to protest, hundreds of federal workers in Washington lined up last week to eat at makeshift soup kitchens. The photos of them doing so were a study in powerlessness.
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Mon Jan 21, 2019, 08:45 AM (0 replies)

Why are there no protests of Republican shutdown?

Following my daily reading routine, I read the article below. I will spend the day trying to create an interest in organizing a protest in DC, in front of the White House.

Do government workers fear retaliation? Are they prohibited from attending or organizing protests?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/opinion/the-shutdown-shows-the-weakness-of-the-resistance/ar-BBSw6BH

The New York Times

The Shutdown Shows the Weakness of the Resistance

By DAVID LEONHARDT 8 hrs ago

The grass-roots progressive movement known as the resistance has had a very good two years. It beat back attempts to take health insurance away from millions of Americans, and it helped defeat a Republican House majority that was enabling President Trump. Neither of those outcomes looked likely when he took office.

But the government shutdown has shown the limits of this new progressive movement. The resistance has had virtually no effect on the politics of the shutdown — and a stronger movement could have a big effect.

When I’ve spoken to people from other countries over the past couple of weeks, they have been shocked that Americans have not begun protesting the shutdown in large numbers. About 800,000 federal workers have now gone almost a month without getting paid. Some are struggling to pay their rent or buy medications. Some have gone to pawn shops to get cash. Major functions of government — airline security, food safety, mortgage processing, farm assistance and so on — have been impaired.

If this were happening in Europe, as Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago told me, people would be pouring into the streets. And yet in the United States, there has been nothing but a few small, scattered rallies.

Instead of lining up to protest, hundreds of federal workers in Washington lined up last week to eat at makeshift soup kitchens. The photos of them doing so were a study in powerlessness.
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Mon Jan 21, 2019, 08:40 AM (10 replies)

Thousands attend Women's March in Phoenix

Video available at link, provided by ABC local channel 15.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/womens-march-held-at-arizona-state-capitol/vi-BBStwZF

KNXV Phoenix

Women's March held at Arizona State Capitol

Thousands of activists marched at the Arizona State Capitol on Saturday in solidarity with the National Women's March held in multiple cities across the country.
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Sun Jan 20, 2019, 09:55 AM (0 replies)

Thousands attend Women's March in Phoenix

Video available at link, provided by ABC local channel 15.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/womens-march-held-at-arizona-state-capitol/vi-BBStwZF

KNXV Phoenix

Women's March held at Arizona State Capitol

Thousands of activists marched at the Arizona State Capitol on Saturday in solidarity with the National Women's March held in multiple cities across the country.
Posted by saidsimplesimon | Sun Jan 20, 2019, 09:53 AM (0 replies)
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