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erronis

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Hometown: Green Mountains
Home country: US
Member since: Tue Feb 5, 2013, 04:27 PM
Number of posts: 7,915

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I would have put the emphasis on *THEY* since they are obviously not us.

THEY are a separate class perhaps separated by a totally unique genome.

Definitely separated by wealth and access to more than the mere basics of life.

THEY are the ones who are destroying the democratic process. THEY do not want us to have a say in THEIR activities. Laws are only for THEM.

THEY can pal around with others around the world who are intent on harming us. THEY only care about THEIR bank accounts and sometimes their families.

THEY don't care about the state of the world or its climate because THEY can insulate THEMSELVES for a while. But not forever. THEIR time will come.

"Why American and Britain are Self-Destructing" - great piece via Eudiamonics

How The Death Spiral of a Rich Society Begins With Austerity, and Ends With Poverty, Despair, and Collapse

https://eand.co/why-american-and-britain-are-self-destructing-a8693ebb097
There’s a simple fact that’s not noticed or remarked on nearly enough. The world’s two large English speaking societies, America and Britain, are collapsing. And they are collapsing in eerily similar ways, for eerily similar reasons, too. Yet in these societies, this basic point doesn’t seem to be understood much, if at all. And yet it’s not really a matter for debate. It’s a simple empirical fact.

There are only two societies in the rich world where life is getting shorter, poorer, meaner, and more hopeless — fast. Where life expectancies, incomes, and savings are all falling. America and Britain. Where middle classes have imploded, people live hand to mouth, and upward mobility has all but vanished. Where the idea of living a better life is somewhere between a joke and a distant memory. Where entire generations of young people — at last count, three, Gen X, Millennials, and Get Z — live worse lives than their parents and grandparents. Just two such societies where trust, happiness, and purpose have all imploded catastrophically — while depression, rage, anxiety, and suicide are all surging.

In fact, there are just a handful of societies with those grim statistics anywhere in the world — Venezeula, perhaps, Russia, North Korea, war torn African shells. Failed states, in other words. That is what America and Britain are becoming.

In a failed state, progress has become regress. That’s what happened to these societies. They are self-destructing. America, of course, is further down that road. But Britain is catching up fast. So how did they get here?

America and Britain have entered a vicious cycle, a death spiral. It’s a novel and bizarre phenomenon for a modern, rich society, unseen since Weimar Germany. It goes like this. In the 1980s, America began decades of underinvestment in public goods and social systems. It privatized whatever there was to privatize. The idea was that whatever it was — healthcare, education, finance — the private sector could do it better. The Reagan Revolution was in full effect — as a backlash to the advances civil rights made in the 1960s and 1970s, the good white American using “choice” as a shield to protect themselves from ever having to invest in or mingle with those dirty, filthy subhumans. All that was called “neoliberalism.” Let markets sort it all out! Translation: let the strong survive, and the weak perish.

It's wonderful. I think men should be banned from any form of power.

Being an XY myself with loads of daughters, sisters, aunts, grand-daughters.

Women seem to have a much better sense of how to make this planet livable and our lives enjoyable.

Perfect. The amba$$ador has just witnessed the streisand effect.

How to call attention to something most people wouldn't know about.

Bunch of clowns in the executive branch. Thanks (r)epuglicons and russians.

Wrong. It's just pure greed and dominance. Ne'er do wells decide to go into religion

Not saying that Jesus the carpenter wasn't a good cabinet maker...

I've known too many people with too few skills that get themselves into a church and essentially beg for money.

Great thread. I've been umair haque's writing in Eudaimonia for a while

https://eand.co/@umairh

He has a striking perspective on our cultures.

Let's see. This is the reformulated SCOTUS with Anthony Kennedy giving up his seat for Kavanaugh

and Kennedy's son in Deutsche Bank being one of the heads of the unit that loaned trump money.

and Gorsuch being installed by Sen. BugEyes instead of Garland.

and the Federalist Society pulling strings.

that are being played by Putin.

Sounds like a plot line.

Ann Telnaes always outdoes herself. Brava!

Misinformation Efforts Over Kentucky Vote Could Be Playbook for 2020 - ProPublica

https://www.propublica.org/article/misinformation-efforts-over-kentucky-vote-could-be-playbook-for-2020

False claims of misconduct in the race for governor in Kentucky are likely a precursor to the coming combat over the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential vote.


I'm sure the rUSSRian trolls are behind a bit of this. Altho the (r)epuglicons are evil enough already, they just aren't as smart.
That Uplifting Tweet You Just Shared? A Russian Troll Sent It
(Thanks, G_j)

So Purdue Pharma funds the American Enterprise Institute (AEI)

I wonder how much $$$s from opioid manufacturers, gun makers, prison corporations, military industrial complexes go to AEI and other RW spouts.

https://www.propublica.org/article/inside-purdue-pharma-media-playbook-how-it-planted-the-opioid-anti-story

Inside Purdue Pharma’s Media Playbook: How It Planted the Opioid “Anti-Story
OxyContin’s makers delayed the reckoning for their role in the opioid crisis by funding think tanks, placing friendly experts on leading outlets, and deterring or challenging negative coverage.

In 2004, Purdue Pharma was facing a threat to sales of its blockbuster opioid painkiller OxyContin, which were approaching $2 billion a year. With abuse of the drug on the rise, prosecutors were bringing criminal charges against some doctors for prescribing massive amounts of OxyContin.

That October, an essay ran across the top of The New York Times’ health section under the headline “Doctors Behind Bars: Treating Pain is Now Risky Business.” Its author, Sally Satel, a psychiatrist, argued that law enforcement was overzealous, and that some patients needed large doses of opioids to relieve pain. She described an unnamed colleague who had run a pain service at a university medical center and had a patient who could only get out of bed by taking “staggering” levels of oxycodone, the active ingredient in OxyContin. She also cited a study published in a medical journal showing that OxyContin is rarely the only drug found in autopsies of oxycodone-related deaths.

“When you scratch the surface of someone who is addicted to painkillers, you usually find a seasoned drug abuser with a previous habit involving pills, alcohol, heroin or cocaine,” Satel wrote. “Contrary to media portrayals, the typical OxyContin addict does not start out as a pain patient who fell unwittingly into a drug habit.”

The Times identified Satel as “a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and an unpaid advisory board member for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.” But readers weren’t told about her involvement, and the American Enterprise Institute’s, with Purdue.


If these murderers were held accountable for their crimes they'd never need to worry about hiding their filthy riches.
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