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Miigwech

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Member since: Thu Mar 27, 2014, 11:40 PM
Number of posts: 3,123

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Best Christmas song/holiday song for all "of the ancient old hands and the wisdom of their touch"

[link:|

Bong Appetite - get your munchies on - Chef is 91 years old

[link:http://munchies.vice.com/videos/bong-appetit-nonna-marijuana|

Video is a great summary of all the implications of what the CIA did - Human Rights Watch

[link:http://www.upworthy.com/we-broke-down-528-pages-of-the-cia-torture-report-into-10-tweets-that-sum-up-the-bs-quite-nicely?c=hpstream|

Cheney Calls for International Ban on Torture Reports

By Andy Borowitz

[link:http://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report/cheney-calls-international-ban-torture-reports|

WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report)—Former Vice-President Dick Cheney on Tuesday called upon the nations of the world to “once and for all ban the despicable and heinous practice of publishing torture reports.”


“Like many Americans, I was shocked and disgusted by the Senate Intelligence Committee’s publication of a torture report today,” Cheney said in a prepared statement. “The transparency and honesty found in this report represent a gross violation of our nation’s values.”

“The publication of torture reports is a crime against all of us,” he added. “Not just those of us who have tortured in the past, but every one of us who might want to torture in the future.”

Saying that the Senate’s “horrifying publication” had inspired him to act, he vowed, “As long as I have air to breathe, I will do everything in my power to wipe out the scourge of torture reports from the face of the Earth.”

Cheney concluded his statement by calling for an international conference on the issue of torture reports. “I ask all the great nations of the world to stand up, expose the horrible practice of publishing torture reports, and say, ‘This is not who we are,’ ” Cheney said.
[link:http://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report/cheney-calls-international-ban-torture-reports|

Another shooting with hands up - clear video - what is going on?

[link:http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=7c0_1418130858|

Wall of Films - free - Films for Action

[link:http://www.filmsforaction.org/walloffilms/|

This Russian, always makes me laugh

[link:#t=67|

11 memes about CIA torture

[link:http://www.dailydot.com/politics/cia-torture-report-memes/|

Making us think- PARDON- torture report - Anthony D. Ramero, Civil Liberties Union

Anthony D. Romero is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union


BEFORE President George W. Bush left office, a group of conservatives lobbied the White House to grant pardons to the officials who had planned and authorized the United States torture program. My organization, the American Civil Liberties Union, found the proposal repugnant. Along with eight other human rights groups, we sent a letter to Mr. Bush arguing that granting pardons would undermine the rule of law and prevent Americans from learning what had been done in their names.

But with the impending release of the report from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, I have come to think that President Obama should issue pardons, after all — because it may be the only way to establish, once and for all, that torture is illegal.



That officials at the highest levels of government authorized and ordered torture is not in dispute. Mr. Bush issued a secret order authorizing the C.I.A. to build secret prisons overseas. The C.I.A. requested authority to torture prisoners in those “black sites.” The National Security Council approved the request. And the Justice Department drafted memos providing the brutal program with a veneer of legality.

My organization and others have spent 13 years arguing for accountability for these crimes. We have called for the appointment of a special prosecutor or the establishment of a truth and reconciliation commission, or both. But those calls have gone unheeded. And now, many of those responsible for torture can’t be prosecuted because the statute of limitations has run out.

George J. Tenet, left, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency when the brutal tactics began. The report said he misled President George W. Bush.


To his credit, Mr. Obama disavowed torture immediately after he took office, and his Justice Department withdrew the memorandums that had provided the foundation for the torture program. In a speech last year at the National Defense University, Mr. Obama said that “we compromised our basic values — by using torture to interrogate our enemies, and detaining individuals in a way that ran counter to the rule of law.”

But neither he nor the Justice Department has shown any appetite for holding anyone accountable. When the department did conduct an investigation, it appeared not to have interviewed any of the prisoners who were tortured. And it repeatedly abused the “state secrets” privilege to derail cases brought by prisoners — including Americans who were tortured as “enemy combatants.”

What is the difference between this — essentially granting tacit pardons for torture — and formally pardoning those who authorized torture? In both cases, those who tortured avoid accountability.

But with the tacit pardons, the president leaves open the very real possibility that officials will resurrect the torture policies in the future. Indeed, many former C.I.A. and other government officials continue to insist that waterboarding and other forms of torture were lawful. Were our military to capture a senior leader of the Islamic State who was believed to have valuable information, some members of Congress would no doubt demand that our interrogators use precisely the barbaric and illegal methods that the Obama administration has disavowed.


The Obama administration could still take measures to hold accountable the officials who authorized torture. Some of the statutes of limitations have run out, but not all of them have. And the release of the Senate’s report provides a blueprint for criminal investigations, even if that’s not what the intelligence committee set out to


But let’s face it: Mr. Obama is not inclined to pursue prosecutions — no matter how great the outrage, at home or abroad, over the disclosures — because of the political fallout. He should therefore take ownership of this decision. He should acknowledge that the country’s most senior officials authorized conduct that violated fundamental laws, and compromised our standing in the world as well as our security. If the choice is between a tacit pardon and a formal one, a formal one is better. An explicit pardon would lay down a marker, signaling to those considering torture in the future that they could be prosecuted.

Mr. Obama could pardon George J. Tenet for authorizing torture at the C.I.A.’s black sites overseas, Donald H. Rumsfeld for authorizing the use of torture at the Guantánamo Bay prison, David S. Addington, John C. Yoo and Jay S. Bybee for crafting the legal cover for torture, and George W. Bush and Dick Cheney for overseeing it all.

While the idea of a pre-emptive pardon may seem novel, there is precedent. Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson pardoned Confederate soldiers as a step toward unity and reconstruction after the Civil War. Gerald R. Ford pardoned Richard M. Nixon for the crimes of Watergate. Jimmy Carter pardoned Vietnam War draft resisters.

The spectacle of the president’s granting pardons to torturers still makes my stomach turn. But doing so may be the only way to ensure that the American government never tortures again. Pardons would make clear that crimes were committed; that the individuals who authorized and committed torture were indeed criminals; and that future architects and perpetrators of torture should beware. Prosecutions would be preferable, but pardons may be the only viable and lasting way to close the Pandora’s box of torture once and for all.

Anthony D. Romero is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

[link:http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/09/opinion/pardon-bush-and-those-who-tortured.html?_r=0|


Old Time Radio - A Christmas Carol - New Again

[link:http://|[link:http://www.wnyc.org/story/christmas-carol-radio-drama/|]

The Greene Space presents its beloved holiday tradition — a radio drama inspired by Charles Dickens' classic tale featuring your favorite public radio personalities.

The story will be brought to life by a cast lead by stage and screen actor Mark Linn-Baker (Broadway's You Can't Take it With You) as Scrooge; Jefferson Mays, Tony Award-winning star of Broadway's A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder, as Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past and Present; and Broadway regulars and real-life husband and wife Marin Mazzie (Bullets Over Broadway) and Jason Danieley (Next to Normal) as Mr. and Mrs. Cratchit. Narrating the radio play will be Bill Kurtis, veteran broadcaster and announcer of public radio's Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me.
The rest of the cast will be played by some of your favorite hosts and reporters from WNYC and WQXR: John Hockenberry of The Takeaway; Radiolab's Robert Krulwich; Anna Sale of Death, Sex & Money; Dan Pashman of The Sporkful; and WQXR's Naomi Lewin and Jeff Spurgeon.

Fred Newman of A Prairie Home Companion is back to provide his signature sound effects. Composer/pianist John Forster also returns, with electro-acoustic violist/composer Martha Mooke joining the band. Written by Arthur Yorinks and directed by Elliott Forrest.
[link:http://|[link:http://www.wnyc.org/story/christmas-carol-radio-drama/|]




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