HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » guillaumeb » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next »

guillaumeb

Profile Information

Member since: Mon Jan 26, 2015, 06:15 PM
Number of posts: 36,163

About Me

bilingual, bipedal homo sapien

Journal Archives

Paul Ryan says that now is not the time for partisan politics.

And he is correct. Now is the time for real leadership. Unfortunately for the country, and for the many victims of gun violence, the GOP is essentially a wholly owned subsidiary of Koch Enterprises and the weapons manufacturers who control the NRA.

So unless or until voters recognize this and stop electing these corporate controlled clowns, nothing will change on gun regulation, the tax code, labor law, the environment, renewable energy, healrthcare, or any of the urgent needs in this country.

Private school vouchers are a threat to religious freedom

From the article:

In his newly released federal budget, President Trump calls for funneling $1 billion in taxpayer funds into private school voucher programs. It’s a bad idea for several reasons.
First, public money should fund public schools, which serve 90 percent of American students. Public schools are a unifying factor in our diverse country and their doors are open to all students, regardless of their religion. Private schools, however, serve only a few, select students.


To read more:

https://religionnews.com/2018/02/14/private-school-vouchers-are-a-threat-to-religious-freedom/

Abnormal is the new normal.

Nazis openly running for office on the GOP ballot in Wisconsin and Illinois,

the GP actively collaborating with Putin to subvert democracy,

school shootings and assorted instances of mass gun murder as regular news items,

an admitted serial abuser of women endorsing a pedophile for the Senate,

an admitted serial abuser of women defending other serial abusers of women as fine people,

a President calling Nazis and Klansmen fine people,

levels of economic inequality rivaling 1929,

and FOX news actively working to dumb down the voting population in service to the 1%.

Abnormal is definitlely the new normal.

The GOP is all about freedom.

That is what they like to say. But when looking at what they say:

The GOP is all about ensuring the freedom of anyone to carry a weapon of death nearly anywhere,
but they say nothing about the freedom to be free from random gun violence.

The GOP is all about ensuring the freedom of big business to pay minimal wages,
but they are opposed to the freedom of workers to form unions.

The GOP is all about ensuring the freedom of billionaires to keep all of their money,
but they are opposed to US citizens freely voting for sensible regulations on business and billionaires.

The GOP is all about ensuring the freedom of a fetus to be carried to term,
but they are opposed to women freely excercising their own Constitutional rights.


Jews and Muslims invited to celebrate Carnival in Germany

From the article:

In the days leading up to Ash Wednesday, the centers of traditionally Catholic cities in Germany turn into huge street parties for costumed revelers on a last binge of drinking, dancing and singing before the 40 days of fasting in Lent.
The age-old Christian background to the Carnival festivities — Karneval in German — is mostly forgotten, but religion came up in a new way this year as organizers faced an interesting question. Can Jews and Muslims join in the merrymaking?
At a time of rising anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, their presence at the parades and parties would send the strong signal that they are also part of German society. But could Jews forget the way the Nazis used to ridicule them in Karneval parades during the Third Reich?


To read more:

https://religionnews.com/2018/02/13/jews-and-muslims-invited-to-celebrate-carnival-in-germany/

x-post What the Heart Knows (An exploration of the "mode of knowing that transcends reason")

From the article:

My wife and I were recently invited to lead another service at our local Unitarian chapel and when thinking about what our theme should be, it occurred to us that both Muslims and Unitarians champion the use of reason, firmly insisting that reason should be a bedrock of faith. Yet within Islam, there has always been a mode of knowing which transcends human reason, an intuitive knowledge of the heart which Sufis in particular have attempted to explore......................

After exploring the poem, we................... then invited the congregation to consider a great figure of Western philosophy: Parmenides. Parmenides is often called the “Father of Logic” and his work influenced Socrates and Plato. Most academics like to present him as a rather dry rationalist, somebody you wouldn’t associate with the heart at all.

Parmenides was a mystic, an initiate in the Greek mysteries. Rather than developing logic through dry, rational thought, logic was a divine gift bestowed on him in an altered state of consciousness, a journey into the underworld brought about during a process called “incubation”:



Read more at http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingtradition/2017/04/what-the-heart-knows/#Xf32vBbtks8wss4c.99

Logic as a "divine gift bestowed on him". Similar to being "created in the image and likeness", but rejected by those who focus solely on what they call rationality.

An interesting, somewhat long article, but this "mode of knowing that transcends reason" is something that people of faith are well acquainted with.








What the Heart Knows (An exploration of the "mode of knowing that transcends reason")

From the article:

My wife and I were recently invited to lead another service at our local Unitarian chapel and when thinking about what our theme should be, it occurred to us that both Muslims and Unitarians champion the use of reason, firmly insisting that reason should be a bedrock of faith. Yet within Islam, there has always been a mode of knowing which transcends human reason, an intuitive knowledge of the heart which Sufis in particular have attempted to explore......................

After exploring the poem, we................... then invited the congregation to consider a great figure of Western philosophy: Parmenides. Parmenides is often called the “Father of Logic” and his work influenced Socrates and Plato. Most academics like to present him as a rather dry rationalist, somebody you wouldn’t associate with the heart at all.

Parmenides was a mystic, an initiate in the Greek mysteries. Rather than developing logic through dry, rational thought, logic was a divine gift bestowed on him in an altered state of consciousness, a journey into the underworld brought about during a process called “incubation”:



Read more at http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingtradition/2017/04/what-the-heart-knows/#Xf32vBbtks8wss4c.99

Logic as a "divine gift bestowed on him". Similar to being "created in the image and likeness", but rejected by those who focus solely on what they call rationality.

An interesting, somewhat long article, but this "mode of knowing that transcends reason" is something that people of faith are well acquainted with.








Read more at http://www.patheos.com/blogs/livingtradition/2017/04/what-the-heart-knows/#Xf32vBbtks8wss4c.99

Are thinking skills generally absent among theists?

I pose this question because the following was part of recent post:

The reason for this, I believe, is that its audience has no critical thinking skills. Such skills are not encouraged among religious believers, and for obvious reasons.





I know that this was simply an unsupported opinion expressed by one person, but to say such a thing in such absolute terms implies that religious believers as a class have no critical thinking skills.

What does this reveal about religious believers, but more importantly, what does it reveal about the speaker? And what does it reveal about the dialogue here that such an opinion would be expressed? Is this an obstacle to actual dialogue?

Is my faith the correct faith? Are other faiths wrong?

These questions were posed to me a few days ago. The questioner noted that, because I identify as a Christian, does that mean that I feel other faiths/beliefs are wrong or incorrect?

I said no. But I would like to amplify a bit.

Faith, to me, is the search for meaning, and often, the search for the Creator. The Creator has worn many names in the 8,000 years of relatively recent history, and probably many other names in the long centuries before that.

This search for meaning and the search for the Creator appears to have always accompanied humans. Indeed, even among those who identify as non-theists, a certain segment claim to believe in higher powers or spirits of some sort. I know that sounds contradictory, but read:


Although the literal definition of “atheist” is “a person who does not believe in the existence of a god or any gods,” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, 8% of those who call themselves atheists also say they believe in God or a universal spirit. Indeed, 2% say they are “absolutely certain” about the existence of God or a universal spirit. Alternatively, there are many people who fit the dictionary definition of “atheist” but do not call themselves atheists. About three times as many Americans say they do not believe in God or a universal spirit (9%) as say they are atheists (3%).

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/06/01/10-facts-about-atheists/

But to the actual questions that were posed, I have previously written about the belief of some Friends that in each human is a spark of the Creator. A belief that I share. So if I believe that in each of us is a spark of the Creator, our search and our beliefs, as varied as they are, reflect that commonality. It is that spark that inspires our search and our faith.

I am a Christian, but I would never say that any of my fellow humans are wrong in their faith, no matter what faith that is. I would say that they are following a different path. I would never say that my non-theistic fellow humans are wrong. I would say that they too are following a different path. Not better, not worse. Just different.

Good News: As Cape Towns water crisis nears Day Zero, faith groups spring into action

From the article:

Currently estimated for mid-May, Day Zero would mark the unprecedented moment when engineers close most of the city’s faucets. Nearly 4 million residents would be left to fetch daily water rations of just 25 liters (6.6 gallons) from fewer than 200 central collection points until rains resume or alternative sources come online....


Major political parties and faith groups in South Africa have long recognized the toll climate change is taking on citizens and the environment. As tensions rise and politicians point blame in every direction, faith groups are working across spiritual


To read more:

https://religionnews.com/2018/02/07/as-cape-towns-water-crisis-nears-day-zero-faith-groups-spring-into-action/?utm_source=RNS+Updates&utm_campaign=27ddecf501-E
Go to Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next »