HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » DemocracyMouse » Journal
Page: 1

DemocracyMouse

Profile Information

Name: Mouse de la Soul
Gender: Do not display
Hometown: New Jersey
Home country: USA
Member since: Sat Dec 9, 2017, 01:41 PM
Number of posts: 1,481

Journal Archives

First major policy paper advocating for Green New Deal

Any time I mention the phrase “Green New Deal” I get a strong reaction. There’s a lot of heat being generated about it’s origins, but the truth is, we have 10 years to put a tourniquet on carbon emissions.

Luckily a serious policy think tank has just issued a major paper on what an environmentally responsible New Deal would look like. It’s getting coverage everywhere.

Policy paper by Data for Progress:
https://www.dataforprogress.org/green-new-deal/

Huff Post:
https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5c47a004e4b025aa26be00c9
“The heart of the proposal is a call for 100 percent carbon-free electricity before 2030, the date by which United Nations scientists said the world must halve global emissions or face cataclysmic global warming. But the paper goes beyond that goal, proposing lifting the geographical limitations on the TVA to create what would essentially function as a national power company....”


Yahoo News:
https://www.yahoo.com/news/proposal-aims-legacy-fdr-works-110028891.html
“In May 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Tennessee Valley Authority Act establishing the nation’s largest public utility and setting in motion an ambitious New Deal policy to provide electricity and jobs to some of the poorest Americans in the midst of the Great Depression.... Nearly 86 years later, a new proposal aims to sharpen the Tennessee Valley Authority into the speartip of a so-called Green New Deal...”


The Hill:
https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/426493-economic-reasons-for-a-green-new-deal
Let’s start with economic reasons for a Green New Deal. The global economy is creating half a million new jobs yearly in renewable energy and employs more than ten million people. In the U.S. we’ve created a hundred thousand new solar and wind jobs annually, 12 times faster than in the rest of the economy. Green energy is putting people to work.

Green power is also increasingly cheaper. Here at Stanford, we just signed a long-term contract to buy solar power for less than 2.5 cents a kilowatt-hour. That’s extremely low. Remarkable things are happening in wind power, too... Other countries are transforming even faster. A third of the cars consumers bought in Norway last year were electric, up 40 percent from the year before. The transition lets them couple zero-pollution vehicles with clean hydropower. China’s investing $360 billion in renewable power in their current five-year plan, creating 13 million new jobs. Their Green New Deal is here.

A Green New Deal also makes sense because we’re paying the costs of climate change today. We suffered $306 billion in damages from hurricanes, fires and other U.S. disasters in 2017, the last year data are fully available, a hundred billion more than ever before.”
Posted by DemocracyMouse | Thu Jan 24, 2019, 02:18 AM (1 replies)

FDR's (Democratic) New Deal now has a new, green wonky think tank

Any time I mention the phrase “Green New Deal” I get a strong reaction. It’s either “About time!” or “That’s just too new for anyone to grasp” or “Everyone is taking credit for that!” or “Was FDR a Democrat?” (he was).

Never mind. We have 10 years to put a tourniquet on carbon emissions and a serious policy think tank has just issued a major paper on what an environmentally responsible New Deal would look like. It’s getting coverage everywhere.

Huff Post:
https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5c47a004e4b025aa26be00c9
“The heart of the proposal is a call for 100 percent carbon-free electricity before 2030, the date by which United Nations scientists said the world must halve global emissions or face cataclysmic global warming. But the paper goes beyond that goal, proposing lifting the geographical limitations on the TVA to create what would essentially function as a national power company....”


Yahoo News:
https://www.yahoo.com/news/proposal-aims-legacy-fdr-works-110028891.html
“In May 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Tennessee Valley Authority Act establishing the nation’s largest public utility and setting in motion an ambitious New Deal policy to provide electricity and jobs to some of the poorest Americans in the midst of the Great Depression.... Nearly 86 years later, a new proposal aims to sharpen the Tennessee Valley Authority into the speartip of a so-called Green New Deal...”


The Hill:
https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/426493-economic-reasons-for-a-green-new-deal
Let’s start with economic reasons for a Green New Deal. The global economy is creating half a million new jobs yearly in renewable energy and employs more than ten million people. In the U.S. we’ve created a hundred thousand new solar and wind jobs annually, 12 times faster than in the rest of the economy. Green energy is putting people to work.

Green power is also increasingly cheaper. Here at Stanford, we just signed a long-term contract to buy solar power for less than 2.5 cents a kilowatt-hour. That’s extremely low. Remarkable things are happening in wind power, too... Other countries are transforming even faster. A third of the cars consumers bought in Norway last year were electric, up 40 percent from the year before. The transition lets them couple zero-pollution vehicles with clean hydropower. China’s investing $360 billion in renewable power in their current five-year plan, creating 13 million new jobs. Their Green New Deal is here.

A Green New Deal also makes sense because we’re paying the costs of climate change today. We suffered $306 billion in damages from hurricanes, fires and other U.S. disasters in 2017, the last year data are fully available, a hundred billion more than ever before.”

Policy paper by Data for Progress:
https://www.dataforprogress.org/green-new-deal/
Posted by DemocracyMouse | Wed Jan 23, 2019, 12:41 PM (0 replies)
Go to Page: 1