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Response to Glimmer of Hope (Reply #7)

Fri Dec 8, 2017, 12:23 PM

11. If you feel the Bureau of Labor Statistics is handing out bunk, start here:

Point of Contact for Complaints Concerning Information Quality

Affected persons who believe that the Bureau of Labor Statistics has disseminated information that does not meet its guidelines or those of the Department of Labor or Office of Management and Budget, and who wish to file a formal complaint may send their complaint by mail, e-mail, or fax to:

Division of Management Systems
Bureau of Labor Statistics
U.S. Department of Labor
2 Massachusetts Avenue, N.E., Room 4080
Washington, D.C., 20212-0001
E-mail: dataqa@bls.gov
Fax: (202) 691-5111

Complainants should:

Identify themselves and indicate where and how they can be reached;
Identify, as specifically as possible, the information in question;
Indicate how they are affected by the information about which they are complaining;
Carefully describe the nature of the complaint, including an explanation of why they believe the information does not comply with OMB, Departmental, or agency-specific guidelines; and
Describe the change requested and the reason why the agency should make the change.

Failure to include this information may result in a complainant not receiving a response to the complaint or greatly reducing the usefulness or timeliness of any response. Complainants should be aware that they bear the burden of establishing that they are affected persons and showing the need and justification for the correction they are seeking, including why the information being complained about does not comply with applicable guidelines.

‘Jobs Day’: Monthly release of employment data an economic, political obsession

By Eli Saslow
http://twitter.com/elisaslow

March 9, 2012

The release of employment numbers by the Bureau of Labor Statistics has long been a ritual in Washington, but lately it has turned into an obsession during an election year defined by economic instability. Once each month, a nondescript government agency compiles and releases 24 tables of economic data that have come to define the 2012 election and so much else. Republican presidential candidates turn the numbers into speeches. The president’s staff monitors how they affect his approval rating. The Federal Reserve reevaluates interest rates. Investors prepare for the stock market to rise or fall, sometimes swinging in value by $150 billion in the minutes after the report is released.
....

The raw data had arrived at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), like always, on Wednesday the week before the report’s release: millions of characters representing survey information from 55,000 households; and then, a few days later, monthly payroll data from 486,000 businesses. Kosanovich’s boss posted a two-page schedule on the office wall, detailing the tasks ahead for a team of more than 20 economists. They would be required to make a series of six deadlines. Their work would undergo 15 fact checks and then 15 clearance reviews. They would sit together in a windowless conference room and read aloud from their eventual creation, a three-page news release and 24 data tables, debating commas and verbs for hours on end.

They would do it all with absolute discretion during an eight-day security lockdown, signing confidentiality agreements each morning, encrypting their computers and locking data into a safe every time they walked 10 yards away to use a bathroom. “Is your workstation secure?” asked a sign in the hallway. They all remembered the last security miscue, in November 2008 — the accidental transmission of some data to one wire service a full 25 seconds before the report’s scheduled release, an incident that had necessitated a series of internal investigations and revisions.

“We always tape paper over the windows of the conference room or draw the shades,” Kosanovich said about her typical routine during a lockdown. She made a habit of refraining from answering phone calls or e-mails from unknown numbers and never discussing data outside her office. For eight days, nobody visited her team’s floor at BLS without a security clearance. The custodial staff did not empty their trash until the report was released.
....

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Arrow 37 replies Author Time Post
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 OP
Kilgore Dec 2017 #1
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #2
Fred Sanders Dec 2017 #13
highmindedhavi Dec 2017 #19
BumRushDaShow Dec 2017 #3
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #15
BumRushDaShow Dec 2017 #16
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #17
Norbert Dec 2017 #4
Bengus81 Dec 2017 #5
Fred Sanders Dec 2017 #12
Marthe48 Dec 2017 #6
Glimmer of Hope Dec 2017 #7
LineLineReply If you feel the Bureau of Labor Statistics is handing out bunk, start here:
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #11
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #8
ProfessorGAC Dec 2017 #9
progree Dec 2017 #20
ProfessorGAC Dec 2017 #21
progree Dec 2017 #22
ProfessorGAC Dec 2017 #23
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #10
Steerpike Dec 2017 #14
TheFrenchRazor Dec 2017 #34
IronLionZion Dec 2017 #18
Bengus81 Dec 2017 #24
progree Dec 2017 #25
LenaBaby61 Dec 2017 #26
progree Dec 2017 #27
TheFrenchRazor Dec 2017 #33
progree Dec 2017 #35
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #30
mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #28
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mahatmakanejeeves Dec 2017 #31
TheFrenchRazor Dec 2017 #32
progree Dec 2017 #36
treestar Dec 2017 #37
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