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Response to OBenario4 (Original post)

Wed Sep 27, 2017, 06:57 PM

20. The pictures tell the whole story, and tell it well.

A US American doesn't have to spend much time reading to realize how public or private schooling works in the Americas. Of course, you are 100% right.

Someone is trying to con people who tries to dispute this.

The Cuban systems for medical treatment of the entire Cuban nation, and universal Cuban education have been praised and respected throughout the entire world for decades.

Right-wing Batista fascists tailed young Cuban teachers who, immediately after the revolution, spread out immediately from the cities, into the fields, and mountains, etc. to start teaching those who had NEVER been to school to read. They worked with them in the fields, and at night, brought out their lanterns, and taught them by lantern light. The Batistianos attempted to assassinate them, but the program continued until the entire country was overwhelmingly able to read.





Sunday, January 8, 2012
652. Cuba: Fiftieth Anniversary of the Literacy Campaign

By Yenia Silva Correa, Granma International, January 5, 2012

As the United Nations Literacy Decade (2003 - 2012) is about to come to an end, the number of people in the world who are still illiterate is alarming: 64.7 million children have received no formal schooling and 793 million adults remain illiterate.

Cuba undertook a year-long national literacy campaign which was completed on December 22, 1961 with Cuba being proclaimed a territory free of illiteracy.
The campaign's organizational structures were put in place starting January 1961. In order to teach the country’s 1.045 million illiterates to read and write, volunteer teachers' brigades were organized: the Conrado Benítez, Frank País and Patria o Muerte Brigades, which included schoolteachers and both young and adult volunteers.

. . .

Not even the murder of young volunteer teachers working in rural areas diminished the enthusiasm of those who had assumed with determination one of the noblest efforts within the revolutionary process, and one which was crucial to social justice.
After 12 months, Fidel Castro's commitment to the UN General Assembly in September 1960, "…next year, our people are set to wage a battle against illiteracy!" was fulfilled.
The national illiteracy rate fell to 3.9% for a population of more than 6.9 million inhabitants. This heroic deed would have been impossible without the contribution of Cuban and Latin American students, workers and teachers and the political will of the Cuban leadership.

More:
http://forhumanliberation.blogspot.com/2012/01/652-cuba-fiftieth-anniversary-of.html

I think we can see the difference between people of conscience and those who attempt to ridicule them. There's not much to be said for the people whose only goals seem to try to destroy everything better, finer, more valuable than themselves.

People like those who live to bring life and desperately needed help to others are the ones we respect.

Thank you for this illuminating, and clearly accurate view worth more than thousands of words.

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OBenario4 Aug 2017 OP
GatoGordo Aug 2017 #1
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Judi Lynn Aug 2017 #12
Bacchus4.0 Aug 2017 #16
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OBenario4 Sep 2017 #18
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Marksman_91 Aug 2017 #10
Zorro Aug 2017 #14
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GatoGordo Aug 2017 #13
LineNew Reply The pictures tell the whole story, and tell it well.
Judi Lynn Sep 2017 #20
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