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Response to Voltaire2 (Original post)

Tue Jul 17, 2018, 08:17 AM

4. For reference, a link to - what I assume is - the cited Asma's column.

I assume that this is the column being cited. An excerpt:

...

One day, after pompously lecturing a class of undergraduates about the incoherence of monotheism, I was approached by a shy student. He nervously stuttered through a heartbreaking story, one that slowly unraveled my own convictions and assumptions about religion.

Five years ago, he explained, his older teenage brother had been brutally stabbed to death, viciously attacked and mutilated by a perpetrator who was never caught. My student, his mother and his sister were shattered. His mother suffered a mental breakdown soon afterward and would have been institutionalized if not for the fact that she expected to see her slain son again, to be reunited with him in the afterlife where she was certain his body would be made whole. These bolstering beliefs, along with the church rituals she engaged in after her son’s murder, dragged her back from the brink of debilitating sorrow, and gave her the strength to continue raising her other two children — my student and his sister.

...

Religious rituals, for example, surround the bereaved person with our most important resource — other people. Even more than other mammals, humans are extremely dependent on others — not just for acquiring resources and skills, but for feeling well. And feeling well is more important than thinking well for my survival.

Religious practice is a form of social interaction that can improve psychological health. When you’ve lost a loved one, religion provides a therapeutic framework of rituals and beliefs that produce the oxytocin, internal opioids, dopamine and other positive affects that can help with coping and surviving. Beliefs play a role, but they are not the primary mechanisms for delivering such therapeutic power. Instead, religious practice (rituals, devotional activities, songs, prayer and story) manage our emotions, giving us opportunities to express care for each other in grief, providing us with the alleviation of stress and anxiety, or giving us direction and an outlet for rage.

...

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Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 OP
Wwcd Jul 2018 #1
Act_of_Reparation Jul 2018 #2
edhopper Jul 2018 #3
LineReply For reference, a link to - what I assume is - the cited Asma's column.
Jim__ Jul 2018 #4
Duppers Jul 2018 #5
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 #8
Jim__ Jul 2018 #10
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 #11
Jim__ Jul 2018 #13
gtar100 Jul 2018 #6
Act_of_Reparation Jul 2018 #7
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 #9
gtar100 Jul 2018 #12
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 #14
gtar100 Jul 2018 #15
Act_of_Reparation Jul 2018 #16
gtar100 Jul 2018 #18
Act_of_Reparation Jul 2018 #19
Voltaire2 Jul 2018 #17
Pope George Ringo II Jul 2018 #20
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