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Mon Jun 10, 2019, 04:11 PM

White Holes: Black Holes' Neglected Twins [View all]


By Charlie Wood 3 hours ago



This visualization shows a jet blasting from a black hole near the speed of light. In theory, a white hole looks similar to a black hole, but instead of sucking matter in, a white hole pushes matter away. (Image: © NASA/JPL-Caltech)


White holes were long thought to be a figment of general relativity born from the same equations as their collapsed star brethren, black holes. More recently, however, some theorists have been asking whether these twin vortices of spacetime may be two sides of the same coin.

To a spaceship crew watching from afar, a white hole looks exactly like a black hole. It has mass. It might spin. A ring of dust and gas could gather around the event horizon — the bubble boundary separating the object from the rest of the universe. But if they kept watching, the crew might witness an event impossible for a black hole — a belch. "It's only in the moment when things come out that you can say, 'ah, this is a white hole,'" said Carlo Rovelli, a theoretical physicist at the Centre de Physique Théorique in France.

Physicists describe a white hole as a black hole's "time reversal," a video of a black hole played backwards, much as a bouncing ball is the time reversal of a falling ball. While a black hole's event horizon is a sphere of no return, a white hole's event horizon is a boundary of no admission — space-time's most exclusive club. No spacecraft will ever reach the region's edge.

Objects inside a white hole can leave and interact with the outside world, but since nothing can get in, the interior is cut off cut off from the universe's past: No outside event will ever affect the inside. "Somehow it's more disturbing to have a singularity in the past that can affect everything in the outside world," said James Bardeen, a black-hole pioneer and professor emeritus at the University of Washington.

More:
https://www.space.com/white-holes.html

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