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Why the Foreign Surveillance Wiretap Legislation is no Compromise

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Lasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-20-06 05:35 AM
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Why the Foreign Surveillance Wiretap Legislation is no Compromise

Why The "Compromise" Foreign Surveillance Wiretap Legislation Pending in Congress Is No Compromise: The Bill, and Senator Specter's Strange Reversal on the Issue


New legislation that would rewrite the rules governing foreign surveillance wiretaps is making its way through the Senate Judiciary Committee. The legislation's content is predictable: The GOP-controlled Congress is giving the President essentially what he wants, by approving his NSA wiretapping program.

<snip>

The legislation that's pending in the Judiciary Committee - touted as a compromise - is meant to resolve the issue, and to quiet those who would make an issue out of Bush's aggrandized view of his own power. The proposed law has been touted as a compromise between the Administration and its critics - one that purportedly has Bush acquiescing in the need to have the FISA Court approve foreign intelligence wiretaps.

In fact, this legislation is no compromise. It aims to render the Executive's compliance with FISA voluntary - and that's Attorney General Gonzales's interpretation, not just my own. It also aims to ensure that no meaningful judicial evaluation of the Bush program will ever take place.

<snip>

If Congress wants to endorse what Bush has been doing, it should do so honestly and not pretend that it is setting up a genuine judicial evaluation of the President's power to do what he's been doing. And if Specter has changed his mind, he ought to say so.

The principle at issue here could not be more fundamental: It is that of our Constitution's system of checks and balances. If Congress is going to indeed allow the President unilateral surveillance powers, and if it is even going to try to stop any federal court from standing in the way, then the public should know.

http://writ.news.findlaw.com/lazarus/20060720.html


The entire article provides an interesting legal analysis.
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Vinnie From Indy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-20-06 06:59 AM
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1. Let's hope Democrat's in Congress speak out
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