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Ron Obvious

Profile Information

Name: Ron
Gender: Male
Home country: Middle Earth
Current location: Seattle
Member since: Tue Dec 13, 2011, 11:37 PM
Number of posts: 5,946

About Me

I got the nickname Ron Obvious because -- in addition to being a huge Python fan -- my name really is Ron and I used to start sentences with \"Obviously\" a lot. Obviously, that\'s no longer a problem.

Journal Archives

[Science Daily] How fructose in the diet contributes to obesity

I've always suspected high fructure corn syrup is a major contributor to our obesity epidemic: That stuff's in everything. When you look back at pictures from, say 1950-1980 doesn't it strike you how thin everybody was back then? At least compared to today? As I recall we didn't have to do a whole lot of hard work to stay thin either; we just were. Read on...

Eating fructose appears to alter cells in the digestive tract in a way that enables it to take in more nutrients, according to a preclinical study from investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. These changes could help to explain the well-known link between rising fructose consumption around the world and increased rates of obesity and certain cancers.

The research, published August 18 in Nature, focused on the effect of a high-fructose diet on villi, the thin, hairlike structures that line the inside of the small intestine. Villi expand the surface area of the gut and help the body to absorb nutrients, including dietary fats, from food as it passes through the digestive tract. The study found that mice that were fed diets that included fructose had villi that were 25 percent to 40 percent longer than those of mice that were not fed fructose. Additionally, the increase in villus length was associated with increased nutrient absorption, weight gain and fat accumulation in the animals.

"Fructose is structurally different from other sugars like glucose, and it gets metabolized differently," said senior author Dr. Marcus DaSilva Goncalves, the Ralph L. Nachman Research Scholar, an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and an endocrinologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "Our research has found that fructose's primary metabolite promotes the elongation of villi and supports intestinal tumor growth."

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210818135218.htm

'The greatest striker': Gerd Mller, legendary German forward, dies aged 75

He lived just long enough to see Lewandowski break his 49 year old record of goals scored in a single season last year.

Legendary German striker Gerd Müller has died aged 75. The forward scored 68 goals in 62 appearances for West Germany, including the winning goal in the 1974 World Cup final against Holland.

During 15 years at Bayern, Muller netted a record 365 goals in 427 Bundesliga games and 66 goals in 74 European matches.

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2021/aug/15/gerd-muller-germany-bayern-munich-dies-aged-75

Unpatched iPhone Bug Allows Remote Device Takeover

Amazing. It sounds like an old-fashioned sprintf() style bug with unchecked parameters, if that's not too dated a reference these days.

Summary: A Wifi router with the SSID "%p%s%s%s%s%n" can take over your phone if you connect to it (automatically or otherwise)

A format-string bug believed to be a low-risk denial-of-service issue turns out to be much nastier than expected.

A vulnerability in Apple iOS opens the door to remote code execution (RCE), researchers found. The assessment is a revision from a previous understanding of the flaw that viewed it as a low-risk (and somewhat wacky) denial-of-service (DoS) problem affecting iPhone’s Wi-Fi feature.

The original DoS issue is a string-format bug discovered by researcher Carl Schou, who found that connecting to an access point with the SSID “%p%s%s%s%s%n” would disable a device’s Wi-Fi.”

https://threatpost.com/unpatched-iphone-bug-remote-takeover/167922/

Sixty years of hurt....

Jules Rimet still gleaming
Sixty years of hurt
Never stopped me dreaming....

A preview of the England song for the 2026 World Cup, a mere 5 years away now.

Oh well, best team of the tournament won it in the end. I can live with that.

Windows 11

[CNN Health] They lost their loved ones to Covid. Then they heard from them again

What an embarrassment for CNN. Communication from the great beyond, dear oh dear. Interesting from the point of view of psychology, sure, but that's now how this is presented.

[video] Pottling around (couple of Pixie sightings)

This is a rather charming series of videos from a guy calling himself Erwin Saunders ambling through the woods looking for pixies and filming them. They're really rather well done and very professional looking too.

&t=233s

Shatner and Nimoy together on the screen for the first time (1964)

This is from The Man from U.N.C.L.E. I was reading an interview with the 90 y.o. Shatner and one link lead to another.

Blink and you'll miss it, but you can just imagine Nimoy thinking "Fascinating".

Soviet TV version of Lord of the Rings rediscovered after 30 years (youtube link included)

Russian-language film posted on YouTube delights fans with its rudimentary sets and ludicrous special effects

A Soviet television adaptation of The Lord of the Rings thought to have been lost to time was rediscovered and posted on YouTube last week, delighting Russian-language fans of JRR Tolkien.

The 1991 made-for-TV film, Khraniteli, based on Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring, is the only adaptation of his Lord of the Rings trilogy believed to have been made in the Soviet Union.

Aired 10 years before the release of the first instalment of Peter Jackson’s movie trilogy, the low-budget film appears ripped from another age: the costumes and sets are rudimentary, the special effects are ludicrous, and many of the scenes look more like a theatre production than a feature-length film.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/05/soviet-tv-version-lord-of-the-rings-rediscovered-after-30-years


Here it is (for now, until the Tolkien estate issues the take-down notice, I suspect)

Cattle Acrobatics

I don't know where this is or exactly what kind of animal it is, but I'm sure he meant to do that.

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