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Tue Apr 16, 2019, 09:30 AM

The Rose Window of Notre Dame (La Rosace Nord) appears to have survived.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2019/apr/15/notre-dame-cathedral-fire-paris-france-landmark-live-news



There are several rose windows, some may not have made it. I was always fascinated by this one.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2019/apr/16/assessing-damage-notre-dame-cathedral-in-pictures#img-10

12 replies, 1090 views

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Reply The Rose Window of Notre Dame (La Rosace Nord) appears to have survived. (Original post)
deminks Apr 2019 OP
FakeNoose Apr 2019 #1
mopinko Apr 2019 #9
FakeNoose Apr 2019 #10
mopinko Apr 2019 #11
TheBlackAdder Apr 2019 #2
zipplewrath Apr 2019 #3
TheBlackAdder Apr 2019 #4
TruckFump Apr 2019 #5
MFM008 Apr 2019 #6
deminks Apr 2019 #7
Amishman Apr 2019 #8
Raine Apr 2019 #12

Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 09:38 AM

1. Amazing! I'm so hoping these windows can be saved

These are all precious works of art, they're historic artifacts. No modern copy of these stained-glass windows could ever do them justice. In some cases the medieval methods of glass-staining cannot be duplicated now. We don't know the formulas they used to stain the glass. The technology has not been preserved to the modern era.

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Response to FakeNoose (Reply #1)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 10:49 AM

9. i dont know if that is true. in every art, there are folks intent on the old ways.

i used to do clay, and i had a lot of friends who did woodfiring for the fun/love of it.
and there are def those that know or have researched old glaze recipes from almost that time.
and there are lots and lots of experts in restoring this kind of glass, and crazies at the kiln looking for something different whether new or old.

i hope that as they search for experts, they look to the art world.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #9)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 12:44 PM

10. During the Middle Ages, the manufacture of stained glass

... was considered a "trade secret." Sort of like the recipe for Coca-Cola for example. So it was never written down, and it was only passed from one generation to the next among the glass makers in certain families. With wars, plagues and social/economic problems, the generational chain was broken and the formulas were lost or forgotten.

I'm talking about the manufacture of the colors, not the making of the glass itself. Some of those stain-glass colors cannot be duplicated even today.

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Response to FakeNoose (Reply #10)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 01:11 PM

11. i dont want to argue about it. that is certainly the conventional wisdom.

i'm just sayin artists pass down secrets, they understand the process, they experiment for the fun of it.

possible no one now is making those colors, but if it were put out that the contract would go to the person who could come closest to those rare colors, you might find some of the secrets are hiding in plain sight. and where to look for them is w artists.

hell, i bet chihully has produced whatever colors that are supposedly lost.
i would be genuinely curious what, exactly, is not reproducible. and i would put money on someone finding a way to do it.

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Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 09:40 AM

2. The 600 year-old wood organ survived too!

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Response to TheBlackAdder (Reply #2)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 09:55 AM

3. WHAT!!!!!????

Really? Are you sure? That's almost unimaginable.

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Response to zipplewrath (Reply #3)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 09:56 AM

4. My daughter came in the room a little while ago, all happy the Rose Window & organ survived.

.

Per wiki, it looks newer than that, though:

One of the earliest organs at Notre-Dame, built in 1403 by Friedrich Schambantz, was replaced between 1730 and 1738 by François Thierry. During the restoration of the cathedral by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, Aristide Cavaillé-Coll built a new organ, using pipe work from the former instruments. The organ was dedicated in 1868.

In 1904, Charles Mutin modified and added several stops; in 1924, an electric blower was installed. An extensive restoration and cleaning was carried out by Joseph Beuchet in 1932. Between 1959 and 1963, the mechanical action with Barker levers was replaced with an electric action by Jean Hermann, and a new organ console was installed.

During the following years, the stoplist was gradually modified by Robert Boisseau (who added three chamade stops: 8', 4', and 2'/16' in 1968) and Jean-Loup Boisseau after 1975, respectively. In fall 1983, the electric combination system was disconnected due to short-circuit risk.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notre-Dame_de_Paris


.

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Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 10:03 AM

5. Wow...and thank you for the info. EOM

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Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 10:17 AM

6. Reporting all 3

Rose windows survived.
Which may qualify as a miracle....

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Response to MFM008 (Reply #6)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 10:22 AM

7. That is indeed wonderful news.

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Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 10:27 AM

8. The inner stone vault kept the worst of the fire out

The vault was only breached in the center where the steeple collapsed.

Of the four ends of the cathedral, the east end got the worst of it, and lost it's stained glass - but the east is the only end without a rose window.

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Response to deminks (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2019, 04:15 PM

12. This is good news, as bad as it was

it could've been so much worse.

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