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Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:31 PM

Adopting a dog - some questions

We lost our cats over the last two years. Can't replace them.

Little one is a teenager and my wife and her have been talking about a dog.
We got a cage (not sure about that) and we are going to surprise her.

So where are the best places to get one of those dog things?

My wife and I are going between a puppy or an older dog - my preference. We bought a boat load of new furniture with the new house so I'd like an older dog + everyone wants a puppy.

So what kind of places PLEASE NO SPECIFIC CITES (unless they are in Richmond VA) to get a dog?

I have a connection to the blind world so I'm going to see if there is a retiring assistance dog out there.

64 replies, 1672 views

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Reply Adopting a dog - some questions (Original post)
underpants Jul 26 OP
comradebillyboy Jul 26 #1
Boxerfan Jul 26 #2
Sancho Jul 26 #3
lindysalsagal Jul 26 #4
targetpractice Jul 26 #21
Doreen Jul 26 #31
Me. Jul 27 #53
Drahthaardogs Jul 26 #38
trof Jul 27 #57
targetpractice Jul 27 #59
Drahthaardogs Jul 28 #62
DBoon Jul 26 #34
sakabatou Jul 26 #5
Cattledog Jul 26 #6
Arkansas Granny Jul 26 #7
DBoon Jul 26 #36
renate Jul 26 #8
Hortensis Jul 26 #14
womanofthehills Jul 27 #47
mnhtnbb Jul 26 #9
Hortensis Jul 26 #17
leftieNanner Jul 26 #10
Tech Jul 26 #11
LisaL Jul 26 #24
MichMan Jul 26 #12
voteearlyvoteoften Jul 26 #13
maxsolomon Jul 26 #15
roody Jul 27 #52
maxsolomon Jul 29 #64
mopinko Jul 26 #16
maxsolomon Jul 26 #19
Drahthaardogs Jul 26 #39
Backseat Driver Jul 26 #18
UniteFightBack Jul 26 #20
zackymilly Jul 26 #22
LisaL Jul 26 #23
bamagal62 Jul 26 #25
donkeypoofed Jul 26 #26
emmaverybo Jul 26 #27
ooky Jul 26 #28
flvegan Jul 26 #29
Haggis for Breakfast Jul 26 #30
Hermit-The-Prog Jul 26 #32
Doreen Jul 26 #35
leftieNanner Jul 27 #54
Doreen Jul 26 #33
DeminPennswoods Jul 26 #37
phylny Jul 26 #40
Buzz cook Jul 26 #41
Bayard Jul 27 #42
standingtall Jul 27 #43
StarfishSaver Jul 27 #44
boston bean Jul 27 #45
Ilsa Jul 27 #46
obamanut2012 Jul 27 #48
stopwastingmymoney Jul 27 #49
OnDoutside Jul 27 #50
LisaL Jul 27 #56
OnDoutside Jul 28 #60
roody Jul 27 #51
The empressof all Jul 27 #55
trof Jul 27 #58
mercuryblues Jul 28 #61
cwydro Jul 28 #63

Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:36 PM

1. Check out organizations like Lapdog Rescue or some

breed specific rescue organizations. A nice house broken and socialized two year old dog would be a safe way to go. The Humane Society and local shelters can be good as well. My current dog is from a city shelter and she has been a perfect dog for us.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:37 PM

2. Rescue-Go to the local shelter

Lots of loveable doggers in need of a new home.

They will also help you with advice & making sure you have a healthy animal.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:39 PM

3. There are a bunch of great rescue organizations...

We've had dogs for decades. Expensive, large, and small. Our current dogs are two small rescue dogs that were quite young.

It would help if you could identify a breed that fits your home and situation, but there are plenty of organizations that adopt out dogs of all types and ages.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:40 PM

4. Read a Cesar Milan book about dog behavior and know what breeds are like.

Cats are pretty much all the same, but dogs can be lots of work, depending on the breed.

Size, hair, intelligence, temperament for training, all things you need to be ready for. The wrong breed won't fit your family's lifestyle and you'll be in for lots of hurt feelings.

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Response to lindysalsagal (Reply #4)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:29 PM

21. With due respect, Cesar Milan techniques are abusive...

... As is his adherence to "pack theory".

Modern canine cognition science does not support the pack theory, and The American Humane Society calls Milan's techniques "cruel and dangerous."

I suggest reading "Dog Sense" by John Bradshaw... The latest science and research about dog cognition.

Watch some Zak George training videos on YouTube. He just started a new series where he just got a puppy and will train it in essentially real time as the puppy grows up.

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Response to targetpractice (Reply #21)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:25 PM

31. Exactly, I have NEVER been impressed

with "you got to show who's boss" crap. Now, I like Victoria Stillwell she is awesome. It is the owners who need to be trained along with the dogs.

Dogs do not understand why you are being rough and aggresive. It can cause a dog to be dangerously unpredictable to train the Ceaser way.

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Response to Doreen (Reply #31)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 06:47 PM

53. Dogs Know Who The Boss Is

They are

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Response to targetpractice (Reply #21)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:50 PM

38. Ceasar is still better than Gloria Stillwell

She is a fraud. A model who has a fake dog training show. When she tried to train with malinos, she got bitten bad. When she tried to train a high powered field lab...it didn't work.

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Response to targetpractice (Reply #21)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 08:02 PM

57. I've raised 5 German Shepherds from pups and absolutley subscribe to the pack 'theory'.

2 males and 3 females.
The pack behavior is inescapable and self evident.

I have also shown Dachshunds professionally.
Same thing.

Put a bunch of dogs together and see how long it takes for the alpha to become evident.

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Response to trof (Reply #57)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 09:07 PM

59. Exactly the point...

Go research the modern canine science... Your own anecdotal observations do not prove pack theory, nor do Cesar Milan's methods.

All disproven "pack theory" observations came from wolves in captivity. Wolves "put together" in unnatural conditions yield stressed behavior. The unfamiliar animals became became aggressive and established an unnatural dominance hierarchy in captivity.

There is no "pack" behavior in wild wolves. Wolf "packs" in the wild are family units, and the "dominance hierarchy" is simply due to older, experienced animals leading, teaching younger ones. Domestic dogs did not inherit "pack" behavior from wild wolves. There is NO pack behavior instinct.

Human companions trying to be alpha over a dog is nonsense. If a dog likes you, they will do whatever you want them to do because you treat them well... not because you are an "alpha". Milan's training is designed to make dogs afraid of him. It's negative reinforcement. And, I realized that old school training is ubiquitous, but it really short changes dogs as companion animals and modern scientific research.

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Response to targetpractice (Reply #59)

Sun Jul 28, 2019, 08:09 AM

62. Actually it's positive reinforcement because you add the stimuli

Negative reinforcement is taking it away. Has nothing to if you view it as pain or pleasure.

David Mech is the researcher you are quoting. However you obviously have not read his studies because you are getting pieced of what he has said. There is indeed a pack. It does have a leader. It is how the order of the pack is maintained where Mech has changed. Farley a Mowatt has some great work observing wild packs.

Cedar does not train. He changes behavior of dog's made neurotic by bad breeding or handling. The ALL positive nonsense is based upon Karen Pryor's work with cetation and probably doesn't translate to dogs 100%.

Gloria Stillwell popularized it with her show. She is a fraud. An actress and model with no real background in ethology.

The best trainer today is Michael Ellis who uses both reward based and aversive bases methods as needed.

I have degrees in toxicology and ethology as I had planned to work for a large Agriculture company back in the day. I train dog's professionally on the side.

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Response to lindysalsagal (Reply #4)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:37 PM

34. NO! Read Puppies for Dummys

or Dog Perfect by the same author.

I will always remember "feet before paws"

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:41 PM

5. A shelter would be good

But on a different note, this really should belong in the Lounge.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:42 PM

6. Go to your local Humane Society

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:43 PM

7. If you have nice furniture, I would definitely suggest an adult dog instead of a puppy.

Puppies being what they are, they chee on things. They do grow out of it, but they can do a lot of damage to a lot of things before they do. With an adult dog you know what size it will be and you can get a good idea of their temperament.

ETA: As far as breed goes, my personal favorite is mixed breed. I just love little mutt dogs and they come in so many varieties. 😄

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Response to Arkansas Granny (Reply #7)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:38 PM

36. Puppies think your bare feet are a chewy toy

and those puppy teeth really hurt

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:45 PM

8. We've adopted two adult dogs and one puppy

The puppy has grown up into a FABULOUS and indeed perfect dog, but... never again. Never ever again.

I strongly recommend getting an adult dog. You can tell more about the kind of personality you're going to be living with for a decade or (hopefully) more, and they're usually house trained and don't chew on everything. Puppies are super cute but SO MUCH MORE WORK and you have to put a lot of effort into training them so they aren't undisciplined, whereas if an older dog is affectionate and calm, you've already skipped the hard part.

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Response to renate (Reply #8)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:56 PM

14. Our daughter found babysitting their puppy through the

early months as restrictive as having a small child. Until she got old enough to be trusted around the furniture, she couldn't leave her for more than very short periods (in a cage). And, of course, there's the training...

They got a puppy for their sons but also say once is enough, never, ever again.

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Response to renate (Reply #8)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:36 AM

47. Actually, I prefer to get a puppy even though my puppy chewed all my Keen sandles up

I have two dogs - one I got as a puppy and one from a shelter. My puppy bonded with me instantly (like one day) but it took the shelter dog about a year. I hate cages for dogs although some of my friends use them.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:47 PM

9. I found my Snowy--who was 3 years old--on petfinder

https://www.petfinder.com/


She had been rescued out of a high kill shelter in Marietta, GA by a rescue organization from South Carolina and I drove to a rest stop in North Carolina (where I live) to meet the woman from the rescue organization who was fostering her.

She's been with me for almost 10 years now. She's a mix of Golden Retriever and American Eskimo. Got along with cats, loves other dogs and is her momma's baby. She has always followed me all around the house.

I had two other wonderful dogs that I adopted from animal shelters. Both of them were females and both about a year old at the time.

It helps if you have an idea what kind of breed or mix you want. Many of the rescue organizations will have their dogs listed on petfinder.

I would encourage you to check with your local animal shelters, but also take a look on petfinder.

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Response to mnhtnbb (Reply #9)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:02 PM

17. Yes, I was going to post petfinder as a place to start

musing at home.

For example, this is Blanche, 6 miles from "Richmond, VA." Too bad the picture won't open up.
She's a cutie.

https://dl5zpyw5k3jeb.cloudfront.net/photos/pets/45374218/5/?bust=1564176813&width=560

Blanche is a 5-year-old spayed female yellow lab. Blanche weighs 50 pounds and is up to date on shots. This dog is approved for homes with children ages 10 and up.

Sweet Blanche is having a wonderful time in her foster home. She has benefited from having someone home more often than not, and from having canine foster siblings. She will need to go to a home with similar dynamics, preferably one with a spirited, playful resident dog so Blanche can enjoy good playtimes. She is an incredibly sweet and smart girl. She has an adventurous heart and will try to figure out a way to keep moving to whatever is ahead of her. That means she will try to escape a fenced yard if left to her own accord. She absolutely loves walks and will be certain to remind you if you don't take her on at least 2-3 walks per day. She has shown some interest in investigating the trash bin - possibly because she was used to getting her meals from one. Her foster family is feeding her 3 times a day right now as she is still slightly underweight.

This dog is from a rural area and has not been exposed to traffic, noise, or groups of people. For now we are limiting placement to standalone, single family homes in a suburban neighborhood or rural area. As we learn more about the dogís time spent in foster care, we will evaluate if placement can be expanded to include a more urban environment.

This dog is available for adoption from Lab Rescue LRCP. Lab Rescue LRCP rescues and places dogs in Maryland, Virginia, Washington DC, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware and North Carolina. Adopters must travel to Maryland, or Virginia with their family - human and canine - to meet the dog they want to adopt.

Lab Rescue LRCP has between 40 - 80 dogs available for adoption from foster homes across Maryland and Virginia, and at monthly adoption events. The adoption event dates and locations are listed at www.lab-rescue.org.

https://www.petfinder.com/dog/blanche-45374218/va/richmond/lab-rescue-of-lrcp-inc-md98/

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:47 PM

10. If you are a dog newbie

I do not recommend a puppy!!! They are so cute and so much work. Are you prepared to not sleep for a while? That's a puppy. Are you prepared to deal with potty training? Puppy again.

Be sure to find a good obedience class/trainer in your area. Crate training is a great way to go. Dogs actually like being in their crates, and it can help with any separation anxiety too. Shelter adoptions are a good way to go, but do some breed research as well.

Good luck! We have had well enriched lives with our dogs.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:50 PM

11. My daughter rescued an older dog who is a sweetheart, decided he needed company and got

a puppy. They had just bought our house and new furniture as well. The puppy is also a sweetheart. Good thing, because she ate their sectional and has dug up most of the yard.

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Response to Tech (Reply #11)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:46 PM

24. Yes, good thing puppies are so cute.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:51 PM

12. Rescues are the best ! So many great companions needing a home.

[img][/img]

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:55 PM

13. Check out the Sato project

They bring in rescues from Puerto Rico and the islands.
We got a great dog and once he got house trained heís a
Super dog.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:57 PM

15. do not get an anxious dog

two members of my family have adopted anxious dogs and it is not a fun thing.

1 dog can't ride in cars - barks if you go on a gravel road (tough if you live in MT and love to hike), pants and drools to the point of dehydration if not barking.

the other dog can't be left alone - destroys the house. my niece pays for boarding every day so she can work.

both were adopted as young 1-year olds. whoever had them previously fucked them up good.

I don't know how to determine if the potential dog is anxious, but man, try and figure it out.

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Response to maxsolomon (Reply #15)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 06:32 PM

52. You can foster to adopt.

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Response to roody (Reply #52)

Mon Jul 29, 2019, 11:59 AM

64. better option.

my method works well, too. no dog.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 07:58 PM

16. if you have service dog connections, find a washout.

for every dog that makes it as a service dog, many wash out.
most would make fantastic pets, and have a wonderful foundation as pups.

and i am likely the only one here who will say this, but-
i wish everyone could do a better job of finding the right dog for them, based on the breed standards. physical and temperamental traits in reliably bred dogs are, imho, a good way to find the right match.
i have had mutts, i have had purebreds, and really, i have had much more satisfying matches w dogs who were known quantities.
there are bad breeders out there, but there are still many, many people dedicated to their breeds and pure bred dogs in general, and i believe in what they are preserving.
imho, the many breeds of dog are one of mankind's highest achievements. i still respect that.

(ftr, my victorian bulldog is one of the best dogs i have ever had the privilege of sharing my life with. if you are at all inclined toward a bully breed, check them out. this is a breed dedicated to rescuing the bulldog from the worst of the dog breeding world. great breeders, doing great work, and producing dogs that cannot be topped.)

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Response to mopinko (Reply #16)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:04 PM

19. i can echo this.

we used a book called "the right dog for you". it describes breed temperments in multiple aspects: intelligence, guarding, watching, how friendly.

we went with a wheaten terrier as a result. good watchdog, fairly smart, but also "open-family". he basically wanted to lick anyone he met.

we did NOT want anything to do with a herding dog. they're insanely smart and focused to the point that it is kind of a hassle.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #16)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:52 PM

39. Yes. I actually only buy FCI registered dogs

Since that register requires dogs to pass working ability tests and rigorous health exams prior to get certified to breed.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:04 PM

18. First thing to do: some research regarding the

breeds that would match your family's lifestyle. Can you, your wife, or teen handle a large breed mature dog or pups with loads of energy? Some breeds don't like to be alone. They call my little furbabies "velcro" dogs. Some have very independent natures. Pups are great fun to play and work with as they grow but obedience training is essential, large or small; also research a breed's longevity and illnesses to which they may be especially susceptible as they age.

Rescue groups can be very picky about requirements for their"forever" adoptions, but the adopted pup you train or the mature but mannerly older dog will be a fine companion that will fill your heart and home with lots of "activity." Some are first fostered in volunteers homes for adjustments after a "situation." Many will take care of the expenses of routine initial care and grooming before it is released to you. They take care that you have made a commitment. Contact breed rescues and shelters in your area when you've decided the age and breed that fits you and your lifestyle. Some on-line research will pay off - fill out the applications or visit in person.

I hope your family will find the perfect pet to adopt.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:06 PM

20. Petfinder.com nt

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:31 PM

22. Check with your local PetSmart. Ours have rescue groups every Saturday out front with rescues. n/t

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:40 PM

23. Puppy will pee everywhere and chew on everything.

Our puppy took so long to potty train, I thought she was never going to learn. But she did eventually.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 08:56 PM

25. If you've ever had a toddler

Thatís what having a puppy is like. You have to watch them ALL the time. Itís a huge time commitment for potty training, socialization, discipline. Itís great in the end as youíve trained them to your lifestyle. But, you have to know upfront that you are basically adding a new child/baby to your household. I love puppies. But, Iíll never have another one. (Potty training is the worst as you have to take them out ALL the time for it to work.) Crate training is the way to go. My dog is 4 and still sleeps in her crate. She wants to sleep there and letís me know that itís time to go to bed!

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:00 PM

26. Please get a Rescue Dog, any Rescue Dog !

It will remember and luv you forever !!

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:01 PM

27. Puppies easily get adopted. Adopting a mature dog sounds more like the ticket for your family

and is a bigger help to the dog world. You might not need to crate train. Donít assume you do unless you do. It is good to get any dog used to a crate as a means of transport, however.

Good on you for considering adopting! Have fun.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:02 PM

28. I also found my dog on Petfinder. The shelter that had him had made a video of him and

I fell in love with him watching the video. He was about 4 months old. I must have watched that video 50 times that night and called them first thing the next morning. I drove 100 miles to the Raleigh area to pick him up that same day. It was about a $125 fee and they had already taken care of a lot of things that needed to be done, including shots and implanting an identification chip.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:08 PM

29. My recommendation

Someone else mentioned Petfinder.com, excellent resource and precisely where I'd start. Consider size, activity level, etc. Decide roughly what "type" of dog you're interested in. Now, find a rescue that has that sort of dog (even breed-specific). One that uses foster homes is the best, especially if they'll let you (potential adopter) talk to the foster parents. They will be able to tell you everything they know in regards to their 24/7 experience with the dog. If the foster doesn't think you'd be a good fit, they likely won't recommend it. Most of them (not all, though) are NOT like used car salesman. They actually care more about the dog than you.

I can't stress enough that as new dog parents, an older dog would be my recommendation. Mutts are almost always the best.

A retired or late-failure assistance dog would be an excellent choice, I think too. Good thinking, there.

Lastly: be patient. Your home may be the 3rd or 4th home that dog has known in a relatively short time.

Good luck!

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:14 PM

30. Police Departments and the Armed Services

frequently retire their dogs after so many years of service.

These dogs need GOOD homes and deserve LOVING families.

Please check into either of them before you make a final decision.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:31 PM

32. If it's not a Mastiff, it's just a dog.



Biggest, smartest, most huggable dog in the world -- an English Mastiff.

Next best is a lab. Mutts can be very loyal and lovable.

Search for rescue dogs or just look on Craigslist.

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Response to Hermit-The-Prog (Reply #32)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:38 PM

35. Uhm

If it is not a German Shepherd then it is not a dog.
😊😁😜

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Response to Doreen (Reply #35)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 07:14 PM

54. Correct-a-mundo!

So say Gigi, Pete, Annie (all passed over ) and Riley!

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:36 PM

33. My niece got a dog from Mexico. She found a guy who rescues

dogs from dumps and the streets and cleans them up and brings them to the border and sells them to people who want pets. I think that is cool. Someone finds a pet and he gets money for his family and a dog is rescued from a crappy life.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:41 PM

37. Your local humane society

is the best place to start. There are also breed-specific rescue groups. The humane society staff will help you with finding the right dog for your lifestyle and needs. They want adoptions to be forever, so they have an incentive to match you/your family with the right dog.

Any baby animal is a handful, though.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 09:54 PM

40. You've gotten a lot of good advice.

My two cents: We adopted our last two rescue dogs from Capital Area Rescue Effort (C.A.R.E) in Richmond. You can look them up on Petfinder. We tend to look for dogs that are 1) good with other dogs; 2) good with children. We don't have young kids here, but might one day with grandchildren.

We believe in crate training and the dogs don't see it as punishment, just a place to sleep. It keeps them and our house safe when we're gone. The other reason, although of course we hope it never happens, is that in case of a fire or emergency, emergency personnel can find them quickly.

Good luck!

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Fri Jul 26, 2019, 10:19 PM

41. Cruise the shelters.

We got our dog from the humane society. They even threw in obedience lessons.

But PAWS or the pound would do just as well.

There are specialty rescues for pure breeds or race dogs.

Mixed bred "designer dogs" have become popular. Puggles, labradoodles and such like. Check them out.

Lastly talk to the people at the shelters. They are knowledgeable and the want you to get a dog that fits you and your life style.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 10:59 AM

42. https://www.rescueme.org

Great site. You can look at any breed in any state. Some puppies, but mostly older dogs. They also have cats, farm animals, whatever.

We've gotten 2 of our Great Pyrenees from that site, and one from the Humane Society. Mini-doxie is from ASPCA. There is usually a reasonable adoption fee to cover their costs, and they are spayed/neutered/vaccinated.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:07 AM

43. Adopting an older dog does not guarantee it will be house broken

puppies are much easier to train than an older dogs. Plus puppies are likely to have more years with your family than older dogs. As far as crates go. I've never used one and I've never had too, but some people need them it depends on your living situation.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:14 AM

44. I recommend going to a rescue agency that has dogs in foster homes

Not only do rescues need adopting and make great dogs, but foster parents are wonderful resources. They've helped to socialize the dogs and know them really well so they can give you lots of insights, advice and guidance.

Also, unlike shelters, rescue agencies usually conduct home visits to make sure the prospective home is safe and suited for that particular dog and that the family is a good fit.

I foster rescue dogs and one of the best things about it is that I get to know the dogs and, based on that knowledge, can be helpful in finding them just the right home. For example, I had a foster dog who ran away all the time - he'd just dash whenever he saw daylight. A lovely family wanted to adopt him, but they didn't have a fenced-in yard and didn't even have a storm door, so it was likely the dog would run away from them at every opportunity. We denied their application, but the agency worked with them to find them a dog that would do better in their environment.

I don't know how most agencies work, but the ones I work with give me the final word on adoption - if I don't feel comfortable with the prospective adoptive family or don't think the dog is the right fit for them, they don't get them. Period. Several times, a prospective family just didn't feel right to me and I could tell my foster didn't really like them - they have ways of showing that, as if to say, "No. This isn't my forever family. Please don't send me to them." And in each case, after I said no, the perfect families came along. The dog and the foster know ...

So, I definitely suggest going to an rescue agency and working with foster dog parents to find just the right furbaby for you. Good luck!



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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:20 AM

45. For me, I looked for an adoptable dog that was between 1-3 years old, already house trained.

I knew I would probably fail in that training and it worked out wonderfully. We now Have a bit of a young dog but mature in some ways.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:28 AM

46. The crate for your new dog should be helpful.

It's a safe space for when they are nervous about weather or new people.

We have rescued lab mutts. Love them like crazy, but they are big.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:43 AM

48. There are all kind of great places in RVA and Cville

Bark VA, Richmond Ruff, and the Richmond SPCA are good ones. They all should have websites.

Cville has the Charlottesville SPCA, Blue Ridge Dog Rescue, and I am IMing you something that is personal.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 11:55 AM

49. Lots of good advise here

A couple of things I would suggest is to research rescues in your area, they likely have Facebook pages where they will post about the dogs they have available. You can go visit and meet the dogs, maybe even volunteer. Also, as someone said above, with rescue you meet and get to know the people who are fostering your dog and they will know all about that dog and what kind of family it needs.

If you have a particular breed youíre interested in try searching on rescue for that breed too. Thatís how I found my Sally. I started with German Shepherd rescue in No California and they had a link to dogs in shelters. We had lost our boy Charlie a few months before and I just couldnít bring myself to go in the shelter. Anyway, I saw her picture and knew she was the one. That started a month or so process of meetings and forms and all of that. Her foster mother chose us and she was such a great help. I still send her pictures and check in occasionally. Sal is 12 years old now and sheís been an absolute joy.

When itís time, Iíll do the same thing again. Youíre going to have so much fun! Dogs are the best.

ETA, yes, she is Sally because Sally is Charlie Brownís little sister

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 06:22 PM

50. We got our first dog this week, a one year old rescue terrier cross, Safe to say it's life changing!

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Response to OnDoutside (Reply #50)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 07:51 PM

56. What a cutie!

Looks like a dog with a lot of attitude.

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Response to LisaL (Reply #56)

Sun Jul 28, 2019, 02:05 AM

60. Yes, completely ! I can see already that she's a real character.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 06:28 PM

51. Your local municipal shelter or humane society.

Be kind to yourself. Get an adult dog.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 07:36 PM

55. We have always started with puppies but adopted an older dog this past Jan.

Since we are older it seemed to make sense to get an older dog.
We got an older lab mix from a local shelter. He came from an animal hording home in Texas. At first I was fearful that he was a little too aggressive. He doesn't really like other bigger dogs and will snarl a bit at them on walks. He doesn't do more than that so we practice avoidance and leash manners during walks. We don't take him to dog parks which is fine with me. He's the only lab I've had that doesn't fetch or swim but maybe that will come later. Our biggest issue is eating behavior. He is extremely enthusiastic with food which considering his background is understandable. We got a bowl that slows his gobbling and that helps. He was very thin when we got him and has put on weight in the past six months. He had some health issues with his lungs which were resolved by our excellent vet and meds but the xrays were pricy and he was on meds for a good month. I'm glad we took the time with him to work on manners and general behavior. I feel he has bonded with us which was a concern I had about getting an older dog. He had a few accidents the first few days he was with us but since then he has been great with the potty. It also helps that we have a yard and are home a great deal.

Every animal will have their own unique quirks and challenges. Our last little terrier that we raised from puppyhood was a terror and throughout her 16 years was never really very interested in us. She preferred chasing moles and giving us the evil eye. We still loved her and miss her terribly.

So you never really know...But for a first dog whether puppy or older do some research on breeds. It does make a difference. And if you are a clean freak....get someone who doesn't shed much. Then again I went to the shelter looking for a small, low shedding female and came home with a 60 pound male beast who sheds buckets full. What can I say...Love is love.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sat Jul 27, 2019, 08:22 PM

58. I highly recommend this book:

How to Be Your Dog's Best Friend : The Classic Manual for Dog Owners
by Kerstin Winter, Monks of New Skete, Walter Brumm

"The monks are internationally known breeding and dog training programs. Weíve published many books related to our lives with the dogs NEW SKETE SHEPHERDS"


https://newskete.org/about-us

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sun Jul 28, 2019, 07:52 AM

61. I would go with an older dog

Your daughter will be going off on her own and you will still have years taking care of a dog if you get a puppy. Surf the internet sites for dogs available for adoption in your area.

Adopt a dog that is suitable for the size of your home and yard. A small home apartment is not good for a big dog. They need room to run.

if I ever get another dog, it will be a shih Tzu. They are smart and easily trained.

Temperament:

The Shih Tzu is an alert, lively, little dog. It is happy and hardy, and packed with character. The gentle, loyal Shih Tzu makes friends easily and responds well to consistent, patient training. It makes a very alert watchdog. It is courageous and clever. Playful and spunky, this affectionate little dog likes to be with people and is generally good with other pets. Some can be difficult to housebreak.

The Shih Tzu needs all of the humans in the house to be pack leaders, with the rules of the house made consistently clear. Owners who allow their dogs to take over may find them to be snappish if they are surprised or peeved. Because of this dogís small size and its adorable face, it commonly develops Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where the dog believes he is the boss of humans.

This causes a varying degree of behavioral issues, such as, but not limited to separation anxiety, guarding, growling, snapping, and even biting. These dogs may become untrustworthy with children and sometimes adults, as they try and tell the humans what THEY want THEM to do. They will be obstinate as they take their stand and defend their top position in the pack.

They may bark obsessively as they try and TELL you what they want. These behaviors are NOT Shih Tzu traits, but rather behaviors brought on by the way they are treated by people around them. Give this dog rules and limits as to what it is and is not allowed to do. Be its firm, stable, consistent pack leader. Take it for daily pack walks to burn mental and physical energy. Its temperament will improve for the better, and you will bring out the sweet, trustworthy dog in it.


https://www.dogbreedinfo.com/shihtzu.htm

They are not known to be little yappers & nippers, but due to lack of proper training they can become so.

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Response to underpants (Original post)

Sun Jul 28, 2019, 08:12 AM

63. A cage?

Iíve had dogs all my life.

I would never put a dog in a cage.

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