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Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:01 AM

College bribery scandal: Ex-Pimco CEO wants out of prison after 29 days in solitary

Former Pimco chief Douglas Hodge, who received the longest sentence of all the parents so far in the U.S. college-admissions scandal, complained to a judge that he’s endured almost a month in solitary confinement, nearly twice as long as what the United Nations defines as “torture.”

Hodge, 62, was sentenced in February to nine months in federal prison after he admitted paying $850,000 in bribes to get four of his kids into the University of Southern California and Georgetown University as phony soccer and tennis recruits, part of a sprawling case in which three dozen parents have been charged.

After twice winning delays on his start date, Hodge reported to the federal prison in Otisville, New York, on June 23, to begin serving his term.

While he knew he’d have to spend two weeks in medical quarantine as a new arrival at the facility, Hodge says his stay in solitary has been repeatedly extended and that prison officials say it could be “indefinite.” Hodge, a Laguna Beach resident before his incarceration, says he’s been held alone in a 7-foot by 11-foot cell almost continuously since his arrival, only allowed out for less than 15 minutes a day.

Read more: https://www.ocregister.com/2020/07/28/college-bribery-scandal-ex-pimco-ceo-wants-out-of-prison-after-29-days-in-solitary/

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Reply College bribery scandal: Ex-Pimco CEO wants out of prison after 29 days in solitary (Original post)
TexasTowelie Jul 2020 OP
Sherman A1 Jul 2020 #1
abqtommy Jul 2020 #2
WhiskeyGrinder Jul 2020 #3
TexasTowelie Jul 2020 #4
discntnt_irny_srcsm Jul 2020 #5
TexasTowelie Jul 2020 #6
discntnt_irny_srcsm Jul 2020 #11
cutroot Jul 2020 #7
TexasTowelie Jul 2020 #8
cutroot Jul 2020 #10
Nature Man Jul 2020 #9

Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:05 AM

1. I think solitary confinement

Might be overdoing it some, but he pushed for the delays in reporting to prison so perhaps that wasn’t the wisest course of action.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:09 AM

2. I've never been a CEO or been involved in what Doug has. I learned fairly quickly in my life

that I didn't want to place my life in the hands of the justice/prison system and that has paid off for me.
One big problem with having money and power is that it provides a sense of entitlement that prevents many people from learning these valuable lessons until it's too late for them...

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:10 AM

3. No one deserves solitary, not even CEOs.

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Response to WhiskeyGrinder (Reply #3)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:28 AM

4. Due to the pandemic,

home confinement with an ankle monitoring with the only exception for medical reasons. Limited access to TV and the Internet--one to two hours a day. No alcoholic consumption. Drug screening. Prison food.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 09:39 AM

5. Just my opinion and maybe unpopular

Non-violent criminals do not generally belong in prison at all.
Fines and restitution should be scaled by ability to pay.
Community service should be ongoing.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #5)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 10:28 AM

6. I have to disagree with you on at least the first point.

If someone has stolen, embezzled, or fraudulently obtained thousands or millions of dollars then time in prison is appropriate.

Crimes involving large-scale distribution of controlled substances also deserve prison time while possession of smaller amounts should require substance abuse treatment. I also would lean towards prison for large amounts of marijuana (over one pound) based upon prior arrests.

Repeat offenses for DUI deserve prison time since the earlier punishments were ineffective in altering behavior.

Crimes involving sexual abuse (particularly with minors) also deserve prison time.

While I'm willing to give some leeway to victimless crimes, if an activity results in harm to someone else then prison should remain as an alternative punishment to fines and community service.

Educational and job training programs should also be required if the criminal does not has the means to earn an income from legitimate work. Meanwhile, "ban the box" should be the policy on all initial job application forms. Misdemeanor offenses for drugs should roll off of employment background checks after a five to seven year period.

Criminals will repeat their crimes if there is no deterrent and if they know that they won't be held accountable. I don't believe that there should be a get out of jail card just because the crime was non-violent.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Reply #6)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 02:11 PM

11. Some details and opinions

Abuse as in domestic, sexual... I consider a violent crime.
I consider DUI repeat offenders violent criminals.
I consider idiots that shoot guns in the air on New Years violent criminals.
IMO reckless driving repeat offenders are violent criminals.

I don't quite know where to draw the line in terms of dollars for prison. It's something I would consider in certain circumstances. Billion dollar Ponzi scheme probably. A couple bad checks for a few hundred not so much.
(Abagnale, Jr goes to prison. While awaiting trial he can have bail in an amount equal to what he's been charged for but they probably shouldn't take his personal check. )

While I'm willing to give some leeway to victimless crimes, if an activity results in harm to someone else then prison should remain as an alternative punishment to fines and community service.
Yes and no:
In my mind, your third arrest for > 30 MPH over the speed limit in a populated area even if no injuries or property damage sends you to jail.
If harm means physical harm then for certain.
If harm means, I stole your lawn mower then restitution should be required and some community service, maybe mowing lawns.

"ban the box"
An unfamiliar term????


Most drug offenses should get you the equivalent of a parking ticket. End the war on drugs.
If you're making a living selling drugs, you should have the same licensing requirements that exist for making a living selling guns: federal and state license, pay taxes...


Criminals will repeat their crimes if there is no deterrent and if they know that they won't be held accountable.
Actually, I believe criminals will repeat crimes unless a reasonable alternative exists. Crime is a gamble. The problem part of the gamble is getting caught. Drug dealers get sent to county lockup for 23 months and get paroled then go back to dealing again.


IMHO, prison is a societal burden not only because it is expensive and dangerous but also because it needs to be humane and maintaining and ensuring humane conditions requires oversight, dedication and infrastructure that is now either inadequate or non-existent. Prison followed by release without reform and followup support is counterproductive.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 10:35 AM

7. Was anyone at the college held accountable for accepting these bribes?

At some point it must have been clearly obvious that this was an illegal act, yet we never seem to hear about the perpetrators at the institution.

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Response to cutroot (Reply #7)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 10:40 AM

8. I believe that someone at USC has been held accountable.

I am certain that at the University of Texas at least one person has been held accountable for their involvement in the scandal.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Reply #8)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 10:52 AM

10. I wonder where the money went.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Wed Jul 29, 2020, 10:42 AM

9. Chump CEO can't hang with JUST one month in the hole?

guess he'd probably wither at forced labor.

Fragility.

So sorry, no fucks to give on this one. I have kinfolk incarcerated for LESS for longer.

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