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nolabear

(41,949 posts)
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 01:48 PM Jan 2022

My sis caught Covid from an unmasked worker at the retirement community where she works.

I am so mad I could scream. She works at a HUGE retirement/assisted living/nursing home community in MS. Think The Villages. Well off people from all over the country.

A guy who works there came to work with symptoms, was tested with a test that took hours to get results, STAYED at work UNMASKED and sat beside her for hours (she’s vaxxed, masked, whole nine—why she sat by him I don’t know) and now she’s pretty sick, as is half the staff. She has asthma and a clotting issue so is high risk. She got monoclonal antibodies and steroids quickly, thank goodness, and is on the mend, but if it wasn’t a hopeless endeavor I’d sue the crap out of the place for letting that fool stay there and mingle with everyone. They’re now understaffed with a resident population who may well have a surge too.

I swear, I had no idea people—not the obviously impaired but business owners, professionals, etc.—we’re so damned stupid til this virus hit. The depression over the collective state of humankind is almost as bad as the plague itself.

68 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
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My sis caught Covid from an unmasked worker at the retirement community where she works. (Original Post) nolabear Jan 2022 OP
Small claims court ? make him show up Tetrachloride Jan 2022 #1
Would this fall under health care worker cilla4progress Jan 2022 #2
Possibly. GB_RN Jan 2022 #24
why the hell does a nursing home allowed unmasked employees? Takket Jan 2022 #3
My dad was living in a very upscale assisted living residence vanlassie Jan 2022 #5
You should look at the crowd of owners DENVERPOPS Jan 2022 #17
This one apparently is Catholic Church owned. nolabear Jan 2022 #40
One would think that the catholics DENVERPOPS Jan 2022 #43
Who knows who's making the rules. The place doesn't seem neglectful. nolabear Jan 2022 #45
Our local diocese hosts vaccination clinics. shrike3 Jan 2022 #60
Only in that bishops in red areas tend to be red. shrike3 Jan 2022 #61
John Oliver's episode on this is one for the ages mdelaguna Jan 2022 #31
I know many people with elderly in nursing homes. shrike3 Jan 2022 #62
I don't know the details of MS, but some areas are allowing positive vaccinated to work cadoman Jan 2022 #6
I don't know either but it's a nightmare. And it hit them. nolabear Jan 2022 #15
And they're short handed because they pay shitty wages TexasBushwhacker Jan 2022 #28
Because management doesn't wnylib Jan 2022 #23
I am so sorry mdelaguna Jan 2022 #32
That kind of work is done largely by women without a college degree. It does not Maru Kitteh Jan 2022 #63
A lot depends on the atmosphere wnylib Jan 2022 #64
The combo of ignorance and arrogance yorkster Jan 2022 #4
Why are workers sitting "for hours"? BlackSkimmer Jan 2022 #7
Security. Checking people in and out of the facility. nolabear Jan 2022 #11
Your statement below weighs heavy on me too. onecaliberal Jan 2022 #8
No kidding, my friend. calimary Jan 2022 #20
Part of it is the work culture in the US for mixing "sick days" and "personal days". Claustrum Jan 2022 #9
It's true. We shame the sick, and don't provide for them at all. nolabear Jan 2022 #13
Yes, there is a work culture that punishes people for taking sick days. Claustrum Jan 2022 #19
Very true. In some people's minds all possible absents are rolled up and used for vacation captain queeg Jan 2022 #30
And there are employers who ACTIVELY discourage taking sick days, which imo, is an outrage. ShazzieB Jan 2022 #47
And the root of the problem comes from the policies and stance of republicans. Claustrum Jan 2022 #50
Absolutely correct. ShazzieB Jan 2022 #55
Same way this culture views/treats the poor misanthrope Jan 2022 #66
I would have refused to let her in. wnylib Jan 2022 #25
I was at my parents house and our culture (I am an immigrant) don't let me to talk or make decisions Claustrum Jan 2022 #29
I can understand that kind of pressure. wnylib Jan 2022 #36
Thank you for sharing your story. Claustrum Jan 2022 #39
Glad that it had a good outcome for your dad. wnylib Jan 2022 #41
I wouldn't call it culture. multigraincracker Jan 2022 #33
I don't know. I don't see the same phenomena in other countries who also has free market capitalism. Claustrum Jan 2022 #34
That would be Somalia. multigraincracker Jan 2022 #38
It has less to do with capitalism but that I would be a gem/virus spreader that I am. Claustrum Jan 2022 #42
Sue him for what? And how do you prove he made anyone else sick? My MIL was in a senior Doodley Jan 2022 #10
Not him. The place. For letting him stay there nolabear Jan 2022 #12
You might get some satisfaction wnylib Jan 2022 #26
Honestly, anonymity is the only reason I posted it here. nolabear Jan 2022 #44
I hadn't thought about repercussions wnylib Jan 2022 #48
Disappointing how it got through mask and vaccine and she got very sick IronLionZion Jan 2022 #14
To avoid being infected by a maskhole, one needs to wear an N95 and the mask has to fit well, LisaL Jan 2022 #16
Exactly. All we can do is protect ourselves. radius777 Jan 2022 #67
We have to start telling people around us to put on masks. LisaL Jan 2022 #18
Damn! The facility should fire the culprit... a danger to their clients and staff. Karadeniz Jan 2022 #21
It's not that business owners are stupid... Chicago1980 Jan 2022 #22
Last paragraph...spot on. Sad. eom LittleGirl Jan 2022 #27
There have been plenty of clues that professional people are stupid soldierant Jan 2022 #35
Arrogance especially. No truer words. nolabear Jan 2022 #46
You are right that business do well under democratic leadership. Claustrum Jan 2022 #56
Unfortunately there's a half thread saying we are all going to get it and some will die progree Jan 2022 #37
Ugh. Pinback Jan 2022 #54
In California this would be illegal. It should be everywhere. Liberty Belle Jan 2022 #49
I think the rules are that, officially. Clearly they didn't enforce them. nolabear Jan 2022 #51
There should be liability here - these companies need to protect their workers and residents FakeNoose Jan 2022 #53
Right to work (sick)? IzzaNuDay Jan 2022 #52
That's what boggles my mind! nolabear Jan 2022 #58
More patients are getting COVID-19 during hospital stays. ... because infected healthcare workers progree Jan 2022 #57
As someone who gets help from a Catholic agency... electric_blue68 Jan 2022 #59
I am glad that your sister got monoclonal antibodies LetMyPeopleVote Jan 2022 #65
I thought it was the law that healthcare workers have to be vaccinated? Emile Jan 2022 #68

GB_RN

(2,344 posts)
24. Possibly.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:21 PM
Jan 2022

Unless they don't take any federal money, which would mean there's no assisted living center that takes Medicare (and possibly Medicaid). If they do have an assisted living center, then they should definitely fall under the federal mandates for vaccinations and masks for employees. And in that case, the owners and management could be held liable for anyone who got infected.

vanlassie

(5,667 posts)
5. My dad was living in a very upscale assisted living residence
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:08 PM
Jan 2022

when the outbreak occurred. My sister and I had already, in the previous 18 months since he had moved in, been continuously shocked by the poor quality of the entire staff. By fall of 2020 the director was still sending newsletters blaming the governor of California for the fact that they were being required to make masks mandatory for staff, etc. No family was allowed into that facility. Dad finally tested positive in November. He died in February 2021. I’m certain Covid was a factor. I’m so glad we’ll never to have to deal with that place again.

DENVERPOPS

(8,798 posts)
17. You should look at the crowd of owners
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:02 PM
Jan 2022

of these places. Uber rich, and squeezing every dime of profits out of the facility that they can.

I was at one visiting a friend....The gal taking care of my friend had a very prominent RN on her name tag.
I asked her where she went to nursing school to get her RN, just to make conversation.
she said: "Oh, I'm not an RN, this place just uses the Letters RN to designate a class of employees."

Cute.

I could write paragraphs about what else I observed, especially at night when I visited my friend.....
I talked to his wife, and she pulled him out of there that same day, and I helped her take my friend home where we both could take care of him.........

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
45. Who knows who's making the rules. The place doesn't seem neglectful.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:31 PM
Jan 2022

At least in general. It’s a luxury village. I won’t claim to know what the rules are but I know there are employees who are lax, at least from the stories. And I don’t think that’s unusual.

shrike3

(3,491 posts)
60. Our local diocese hosts vaccination clinics.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:21 PM
Jan 2022

But "the Catholics" aren't a monolith, and bishops in red areas tend to be red.

shrike3

(3,491 posts)
61. Only in that bishops in red areas tend to be red.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:23 PM
Jan 2022

And vice versa.

Francis has given numerous directives to get vaccinated. Most bishops world-wide has supported them. Conservative bishops in America not as much.

mdelaguna

(471 posts)
31. John Oliver's episode on this is one for the ages
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:50 PM
Jan 2022

If they didn’t pay the floor caregivers low wages - who do all the work - and cut their profit margin how great it would be for all concerned. As it is they have to use un vaxxed employees b’cause there are no willing replacements in the wings. I lost my dad to negligence of one such bottom of the pay grade worker in March 2021. There were some good ones but not vaxxed. Drove me nuts. The elderly are so vulnerable and being in an upscale place lace is zero guarantee (as Oliver points out).

shrike3

(3,491 posts)
62. I know many people with elderly in nursing homes.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:25 PM
Jan 2022

They visit every day, sometimes for hours, to make sure everything's being done right.

cadoman

(792 posts)
6. I don't know the details of MS, but some areas are allowing positive vaccinated to work
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:11 PM
Jan 2022

They need the bodies that badly. I don't know the exact science behind it, but I think we'd all agree at some point you have to weigh between bringing no one in, and bringing in some sick but fully vaccinated people.

Thankfully it sounds like OP's sister is vaccinated so she should be fine.

My takeaway from this: it doesn't hurt to call someone out at your office if they seem sick. "Hey, you sound kind like you might be sick. Did you consider asking for a day off?" They might not have even realized it. You could probably also raise the issue with a manager.

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
15. I don't know either but it's a nightmare. And it hit them.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:53 PM
Jan 2022

Now they are very short handed and I don’t know how they’re dealing with it. I know my sister is supposed to go back to work Wednesday, less than a week after first developing symptoms.

I recognize the dilemma but it’s not been handled well.

TexasBushwhacker

(20,150 posts)
28. And they're short handed because they pay shitty wages
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:39 PM
Jan 2022

for work that is often unpleasant. No one wants to change diapers, whether they are baby's or adults'.

wnylib

(21,357 posts)
23. Because management doesn't
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:21 PM
Jan 2022

give a damn. My uncle died of covid in a nursing home.

Depending on the home, the staff that deal with patients daily might be low information, poorly trained, and poorly paid.

mdelaguna

(471 posts)
32. I am so sorry
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:54 PM
Jan 2022

For me when dad died in March it was like if I couldn’t be there watching and advocating he and my mom would just fall thru the cracks. And then they worked hard to keep me (vaxxed) from being allowed in to spend time (tho the home’s caregiving staff were unvaxxed) on the grounds of cdc guidelines “no visitors.” So your parents need you but they lock you out all the while neglecting them and putting them in danger of breakthrough infections.

Maru Kitteh

(28,327 posts)
63. That kind of work is done largely by women without a college degree. It does not
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:43 PM
Jan 2022

typically attract those with other options since it is very physically and emotionally taxing work for less pay than some fast food joints.

Society places precious little on the value of women or their labor, and our elders pay the price in this case.

I'm so sorry to hear of your uncle. We have seven residents on our COVID ward right now and by God they will get the best care possible or I will die trying to make sure they get it.




wnylib

(21,357 posts)
64. A lot depends on the atmosphere
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:49 PM
Jan 2022

set by management and supervisors. I have known some dedicated angels working in nursing homes for low pay. I have also known some coldhearted, indifferent staff who were there for a paycheck, low as it was, and got annoyed when patient needs interrupted their gossip sessions and magazine articles.

yorkster

(1,462 posts)
4. The combo of ignorance and arrogance
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:04 PM
Jan 2022

is infuriating. And dangerous. The whole concept of the common good is out the window, apparently.

Hope your sister recovers soon.

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
11. Security. Checking people in and out of the facility.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:47 PM
Jan 2022

When I say it’s huge I mean it’s HUGE. The gate doesn’t have a booth; it has a building where several people vet visitors, repair people, deliveries, etc.

onecaliberal

(32,793 posts)
8. Your statement below weighs heavy on me too.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:18 PM
Jan 2022

Knowing how many of my neighbors and community are trying to kill me is almost more than I can bear.

“I swear, I had no idea people—not the obviously impaired but business owners, professionals, etc.—we’re so damned stupid til this virus hit. The depression over the collective state of humankind is almost as bad as the plague itself.”


Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
9. Part of it is the work culture in the US for mixing "sick days" and "personal days".
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:20 PM
Jan 2022

You have no idea how many people I've known in my 15+ years of working that they rather go to work while "sick" instead of wasting/using their precious "sick days". And that is an issue across the board with democrats, independent and republicans alike. I think, in general, democrats are better with COVID because we take it more seriously. But my aunt who works at a hospital, who basically pushed my dad into getting vaccinated and boosted (even though he keeps saying Omicron is no big deal and is weaker than flu) and was a big fan for masking and vaccines. She was sick with flu like symptoms during the Christmas time and she still chose to go to the hospital to work and then came to our home for a Christmas dinner. We got lucky as none of us came down with COVID so she might really just had a flu but I was so mad she came to our house sick.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
19. Yes, there is a work culture that punishes people for taking sick days.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:03 PM
Jan 2022

But there is also another side that takes "sick days" as their "personal days". My dad used sick days as his annual leave days so he would go to work sick so he can save his sick days for vacations. I've never done that and would have unused "sick days" because I am not sick. My dad never have any sick days left every year because he counted them as extra annual leave days.

captain queeg

(10,112 posts)
30. Very true. In some people's minds all possible absents are rolled up and used for vacation
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:40 PM
Jan 2022

Seems the “personal days” are a newer phenomena. At least I’d never worked anywhere that had them. I didn’t ever work at a place that had paid sick days till I was in my 30s. It’s great that so many places provide sick leave nowadays but there are always people who abuse it. Seems like most places it’s “use or lose” which can be counter productive. The last place I worked allowed you to roll sick leave balances into the next year and accumulations could be added to your time in service at retirement. Policies like that really help the situation.

ShazzieB

(16,303 posts)
47. And there are employers who ACTIVELY discourage taking sick days, which imo, is an outrage.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:36 PM
Jan 2022

Some employers (way too many) regard coming to work despite being sick as not only praiseworthy but pretty much expected. In those workplaces, people who come to work sick are regarded as harder workers, more dedicated, etc.

Then there are the employers that give employees one bucket of paid time off that is used for everything (illness, vacation, anything else that comes up), which incentivizes people to work through illness in order to have more pto available for vacation.

And let us not forget the legions of poorly paid workers who get NO paid time off of any kind and come to work sick because they can't afford to lose a day's pay.

The way this country treats its workers (in many ways, not just this) is a travesty.


Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
50. And the root of the problem comes from the policies and stance of republicans.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:44 PM
Jan 2022

They refuse to codify and treat paid time off as a necessity. And they encourage companies to get creative with making people self-employed or contractor so the company don't have to pay retirement, sick leave, and other benefits that comes with a job.

misanthrope

(7,411 posts)
66. Same way this culture views/treats the poor
Mon Jan 17, 2022, 12:22 AM
Jan 2022

American culture revolves a deeply embedded attitude that the less fortunate deserve scorn.

wnylib

(21,357 posts)
25. I would have refused to let her in.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:25 PM
Jan 2022

Or, if I discovered that she was sick after she entered, I would have made her leave. Not out of line to stand your ground during a pandemic.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
29. I was at my parents house and our culture (I am an immigrant) don't let me to talk or make decisions
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:40 PM
Jan 2022

no matter how old I get. The parents and the elders are the one making decisions.

wnylib

(21,357 posts)
36. I can understand that kind of pressure.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:08 PM
Jan 2022

So the only other alternative is for you to leave, or stay and take the risk. Sounds like leaving would mean being ostracized and possibly disowned by the relatives.

I know that I would have just left. But not everyone would feel that they could make that choice.

I used to have a verbally abusive father-in-law. The family tolerated his tyranny in silence and I was expected to do the same. I was young, in my 20s, and was brought up to respect elders and parental figures. I also wanted to avoid creating trouble between my husband and his family, or between his family and me. But one day in the middle of a large family dinner he started in on me verbally and I had had enough. I knew my husband would not speak up on my behalf. Nobody spoke up to that guy. I did not respond to him, did not excuse myself from the table, did not say a word. I just silently stood up and walked out the door.

I was a couple blocks away when my husband caught up with me in the car. He told me to get in, return to dinner, and apologize to everyone. I refused and kept walking. My husband and I lived on the other side of town, a very long walk for me, but I was angry enough to do it.

When my husband realized that I would not give in, he said that he would drive me home. He did, and then called to tell his family that I was not feeling well so he was staying home with me. I refused to go to the next couple of family dinners. My husband's relatives pleaded with me to stop making an issue of it and said I could not do that indefinitely, but I said that I would until he apologized. After several weeks, he did. Following that, I went to their house only for holidays.

Eventually I divorced the husband who turned out to be as abusive as his father. I have no reluctance since then to refuse to tolerate behavior that is harmful to me.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
39. Thank you for sharing your story.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:19 PM
Jan 2022

To be honest, I prepared myself since the beginning of COVID that I would eventually get it because of my family connections. I am relatively young and in good health. I am vaccinated and boosted so I have a very low risk even if/when I eventually get it. So it's easier for me to stay quiet than making a big deal out of it.

And that dinner was productive otherwise because my aunt got my kinda anti-vax dad to get boosted. I say kinda because while he buys and says all the stupid republican anti-vax stance (personal choice, Omicron is no worst than flu, etc), he still got his 2 shots previously and boosted after that Christmas dinner.

multigraincracker

(32,642 posts)
33. I wouldn't call it culture.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:55 PM
Jan 2022

It's the economic system we live under, Free Market Capitalism. Workers are counted as expenses, or capital outlays that need to be cut, not humans.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
34. I don't know. I don't see the same phenomena in other countries who also has free market capitalism.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:05 PM
Jan 2022

We, as a country, seem to let the capitalism run too crazy and placed too high by the right wing. We seem to ignore the human decency part. If I go to work really sick in other countries, the manager would tell me to go home because a) they care that I am sick b) they care that I shouldn't spread the gem/virus to other healthy people. That part seem to be missing in US and is pretty unique in US work culture.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
42. It has less to do with capitalism but that I would be a gem/virus spreader that I am.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:24 PM
Jan 2022

They would talk bad about my virus spreading especially in this COVID time. They would treat me as a human bioweapon if I cough. A lot of other countries (especially Asian countries) care about people spreading COVID. And they treat it seriously unlike here in the US.

Doodley

(9,064 posts)
10. Sue him for what? And how do you prove he made anyone else sick? My MIL was in a senior
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:33 PM
Jan 2022

living community, and I had zero tolerance for anyone there who was unmasked. We all have a responsibility to protect folks in that situation. She should have told him to mask up. Too late after it happens.

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
12. Not him. The place. For letting him stay there
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:49 PM
Jan 2022

He had symptoms, was waiting for a test result, and did not wear a mask. As I said the desire to sue is the manifestation of my anger at the facility, not realistic I know.

wnylib

(21,357 posts)
26. You might get some satisfaction
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:34 PM
Jan 2022

from posting what happened all over social media and then, offline, telling everyone you know about it. Could be doing a service to a lot of people who have relatives there as patients or who are considering placing relatives there.

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
44. Honestly, anonymity is the only reason I posted it here.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:28 PM
Jan 2022

My sister could suffer repercussions, as could I. Not necessarily horrible ones but she would be appalled and could lose her job—unofficially of course—and it would be a hardship. Plus, she’d never sue. She’s just not like that, sometimes to her detriment. But I respect it.

IronLionZion

(45,382 posts)
14. Disappointing how it got through mask and vaccine and she got very sick
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 02:52 PM
Jan 2022

I would steer clear of maskholes as much as possible.

LisaL

(44,972 posts)
16. To avoid being infected by a maskhole, one needs to wear an N95 and the mask has to fit well,
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:02 PM
Jan 2022

without gaps. Cloths or surgical masks don't work that well in preventing infection.

radius777

(3,635 posts)
67. Exactly. All we can do is protect ourselves.
Mon Jan 17, 2022, 03:49 AM
Jan 2022

In real world situations there is little we can do about the anti-maskers, or those who don't wear their masks properly.

Only properly fitting, authentic and new/clean N95's, KN95's and KF94's can protect the wearer from the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Some also suggest wearing protective glasses as there is a possibility that the virus can infect via the eyes.

The idea behind the cloth masks was that 'my mask protects you, and your mask protects me' but that only works if everyone wears it and wears it properly. Cloth masks do work well to stop the exhalation of viral droplets (as the droplets are much bigger and wetter as they are exhaled) but poorly at stopping the inhalation of viral droplets which are at that point dry and aerosolized and much smaller - which only the better masks can stop.

LisaL

(44,972 posts)
18. We have to start telling people around us to put on masks.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:02 PM
Jan 2022

And stay the hell way from us if sick. She is lucky she got antibodies, they are in short supply.

Chicago1980

(1,968 posts)
22. It's not that business owners are stupid...
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 03:19 PM
Jan 2022

They're greedy and couldn't give a damn.

All they know is there's another well-to-do elderly person waiting to pay up for the next apartment.

soldierant

(6,811 posts)
35. There have been plenty of clues that professional people are stupid
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:05 PM
Jan 2022

throughout history. And I agree it goes with being graady, and I would add arrogant.

But you don't have to know all of human history to grasp how stupid and arrogant they are.

All you need to do is go through the history of the United States in the 20th and 21st (so far) centuries and set side be side tax provision, regulatory provisions, and corparate earnings (adjusted for inflation). It's not all that hard to see that businessed overall are must successful under Democratic leadership. And that is also true of themiddle class - it is stringest uneder Democratic leadership as well.But, you know, stupidity - and arrogance especially - people think they know better.

Claustrum

(4,845 posts)
56. You are right that business do well under democratic leadership.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:24 PM
Jan 2022

But they stash all those profits somewhere and wait for a republican president so the top 1% can legally take those profits without paying taxes/their fair share.

progree

(10,897 posts)
37. Unfortunately there's a half thread saying we are all going to get it and some will die
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:12 PM
Jan 2022

Last edited Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:37 PM - Edit history (1)

but what the hay.

https://www.democraticunderground.com/10142854241

I'm very sorry to hear about your sister.

Pinback

(12,152 posts)
54. Ugh.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:15 PM
Jan 2022

“Elderly, immune compromised, under-5 — we productive citizens can get along without you.”

Liberty Belle

(9,533 posts)
49. In California this would be illegal. It should be everywhere.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:42 PM
Jan 2022

Here, every worker in a senior care facility must be vaxxed and boosted, test negative regularly, and wear masks. Visitors must also be vaxxed and masked at least for indoor visits.

Even that is not foolproof; Mom got COVID along with others in her facility despite all these precautions from an asymptomatic caregiver.

But to knowingly allow someone to work unmasked, especially with symptoms, is insane. If this turns out to be a bad case of COVID, sue the bastards.

That said, with Omnicron rampant, even the vulnerable seniors in Mom's facility, all vaxxed, have all recovered so far, so chances are it won't be too bad.

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
51. I think the rules are that, officially. Clearly they didn't enforce them.
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 04:52 PM
Jan 2022

They had an outbreak early on and seemed stringent about things, but I’ve heard many stories of employees not masking. I know the culture and don’t doubt it a bit but it’s insanely inconsistent.

FakeNoose

(32,604 posts)
53. There should be liability here - these companies need to protect their workers and residents
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:08 PM
Jan 2022

Why isn't the company (i.e., the owner of the nursing facility) liable if it allowed a sick, contagious worker to infect other workers and possibly residents of the nursing home? The Covid-infected worker should have been isolated, and removed immediately. Instead he stayed there and infected others who were trying to be careful.

The company has a responsibility to keep sick workers home, away from the healthy ones. When it fails to do that, it should be held liable, as in suing them for damages. I don't understand why more victims aren't doing this.

IzzaNuDay

(362 posts)
52. Right to work (sick)?
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:00 PM
Jan 2022

What was puzzling— a person who is symptomatic, takes a test, but not asked to isolate until test results are available? No backup?
I’m afraid we will see more of this!

nolabear

(41,949 posts)
58. That's what boggles my mind!
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 08:28 PM
Jan 2022

A fool is just a fool. But the facility? Come ON. Multiple people had to look at that and say “Okay, back to work. We’ll let you know.” And others had to put up with the lack of mask (my sister included apparently but there’s learned helplessness there).

progree

(10,897 posts)
57. More patients are getting COVID-19 during hospital stays. ... because infected healthcare workers
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 05:33 PM
Jan 2022
More patients are getting COVID-19 during hospital stays. Experts worry it's because infected healthcare workers are sick on the job, Business Insider, 1/16/22

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/more-patients-are-getting-covid-19-during-hospital-stays-experts-worry-it-s-because-infected-healthcare-workers-are-sick-on-the-job/ar-AASPNRd?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531

... The CDC announced looser isolation rules for healthcare workers in December amid staffing shortages.
The number of inpatients who contracted COVID-19 during their hospital stays rose shortly afterward.

Disease experts worry the CDC policy is fueling in-hospital transmission as infected employees return to work.

... the CDC said the isolation period could be cut even more — down to five days — in the event of staffing shortages. In that case, healthcare workers wouldn't need to test out of isolation. And in a crisis scenario, when there's no longer enough staff to provide safe patient care, there would be no work restrictions at all, the CDC said.
But disease experts fear the CDC policy is fueling in-hospital transmission, since research shows that some people with COVID-19 can still be infectious for up to 10 days.

A week after the CDC's announcement on December 23, the total number of hospitalized patients who contracted COVID-19 AT LEAST 2 WEEKS INTO THEIR HOSPITAL STAY went up 80% — from around 1,200 to 2,200 patients — according to HHS data.

Omicron's transmissibility doesn't fully explain the sharp rise of COVID-19 in hospitals...

electric_blue68

(14,840 posts)
59. As someone who gets help from a Catholic agency...
Sun Jan 16, 2022, 09:06 PM
Jan 2022

This Very Personal info I normally wouldn't share but to present what Proper Procedures are being done in some places....

they deeply encourage(d) vaxs, boosting, masking, distancing. They check up on people to see if they're doing any of this, etc. On current rare visits to their office they have all proper precautions, and will give you a mask if you arrive e out one. (I'm always masked 👍 )

nolabear I'm so sorry your sister got sick from some careless, selfish person! Horrible!

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