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BlueWaveNeverEnd

(7,826 posts)
Thu Nov 24, 2022, 11:53 AM Nov 2022

REPUBLICANS LOST BIG ON ABORTION BALLOT MEASURES. NOW THEY'RE TRYING TO CHANGE THE RULES

REPUBLICANS LOST BIG ON ABORTION BALLOT MEASURES. NOW THEY’RE TRYING TO CHANGE THE RULES
Ohio’s Republican secretary of state says a proposal to make it harder to pass ballot initiatives isn’t about abortion. But as Ohio advocates debate a possible abortion ballot measure, liberal advocates are calling it “a power grab.”

Republicans, perhaps coming to terms with the unpopularity of their antiabortion agenda, seem to be grasping for a new playbook. Republicans in Ohio want to make it harder to amend the state constitution via ballot initiative, which abortion advocates say is a blatant attempt to block voter-driven efforts to enshrine reproductive protections in state rights.

“Ohio’s constitution has been far too susceptible to efforts by outside groups and special interests seeking to alter the people’s constitution to achieve their own ends,” Republican state representative Brian Stewart said, according to The Columbus Dispatch. With the backing of Frank LaRose, the Republican Ohio secretary of state, Stewart has introduced a resolution that would require a supermajority of Ohioans, 60%—as opposed to the current threshold of 50% plus one vote—to change the state constitution.

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The Fairness Project, an organization that backs progressive ballot measures, was quick to condemn the effort. “Let’s be clear about what this announcement means: Ohio Republicans are planning a power grab next year in order to diminish voters’ power at the ballot box,” executive director Kelly Hall said in a statement. “They know voters don’t agree with them on the issues, so they are changing the rules of the game.”

Even LaRose’s own statement regarding the supermajority proposal arguably belies the claim that the current threshold has left Ohio susceptible to the grip of special interests. As he noted, of the 16 petition-based amendments that have been proposed in the state since 2000, only five have passed. And abortion is a particularly controversial issue in the Buckeye state. Ohio’s Republican governor, Mike DeWine, signed one of the strictest abortion bans in 2019, which went into effect when Roe v. Wade fell. A so-called heartbeat bill, it makes abortion illegal after about six-weeks of pregnancy with no exceptions for rape or incest, but has since been blocked by the courts. According to the Dispatch, abortion rights advocates in the state are currently debating whether to put the issue on the ballot in 2023 or 2024.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2022/11/republicans-abortion-ballot-measures-ohio

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REPUBLICANS LOST BIG ON ABORTION BALLOT MEASURES. NOW THEY'RE TRYING TO CHANGE THE RULES (Original Post) BlueWaveNeverEnd Nov 2022 OP
So much for "Listening to the people." BlueIdaho Nov 2022 #1
Yep MayReasonRule Nov 2022 #6
... catbyte Nov 2022 #2
nothing new here . move on. AllaN01Bear Nov 2022 #3
How long before they'll abolish petition-based ballot measures? Liberal In Texas Nov 2022 #4
We don't have that in Pennsylvania either except Deminpenn Nov 2022 #11
They can't win if they don't cheat. Timeflyer Nov 2022 #5
They tried to change those rules in South Dakota this summer... Hong Kong Cavalier Nov 2022 #7
i am glad BlueWaveNeverEnd Nov 2022 #8
The radicalized Republican party wants permanent rule. Democracy is in their way. Hermit-The-Prog Nov 2022 #9
And it always will be vercetti2021 Nov 2022 #10
Yep. That began in the early '90s with the Clinton victory. The right made it clear... keep_left Nov 2022 #13
Hillary's big "crime" was to try to get health insurance and education for children. Hermit-The-Prog Nov 2022 #14
Hillary's big "crime" Genki Hikari Nov 2022 #15
They never forgave her for that ... Hermit-The-Prog Nov 2022 #16
They hate that blue state to the north. roamer65 Nov 2022 #12
When right wingers are defeated at the ballot box, they don't abandon their proposals, mn9driver Nov 2022 #17

BlueIdaho

(13,582 posts)
1. So much for "Listening to the people."
Thu Nov 24, 2022, 11:58 AM
Nov 2022

These ChristoFascists are hell bent on destroying the constitution and the democracy good people have fought for since the beginning of our nation.

catbyte

(34,338 posts)
2. ...
Thu Nov 24, 2022, 12:02 PM
Nov 2022
“Ohio’s constitution has been far too susceptible to efforts by outside groups and special interests seeking to alter the people’s constitution to achieve their own ends,” Republican state representative Brian Stewart said, according to The Columbus Dispatch. With the backing of Frank LaRose, the Republican Ohio secretary of state, Stewart has introduced a resolution that would require a supermajority of Ohioans, 60%—as opposed to the current threshold of 50% plus one vote—to change the state constitution.


Oh, you mean no "outside influences" but the Koch brothers' ALEC and other corporate bullshit legislation? Can't have the people decide what they want their government to be, just the GQP's corporate and special interest overlords.

Liberal In Texas

(13,532 posts)
4. How long before they'll abolish petition-based ballot measures?
Thu Nov 24, 2022, 12:19 PM
Nov 2022

And be like my state:
Texas is one of eighteen states which do not permit any other form of initiative, referendum, or recall.
- https://texaspolitics.utexas.edu/archive/html/leg/features/0902_01/initiative.html

I wish we could get some petition generated things on the ballot. It might get more people out to vote for one thing.

Deminpenn

(15,265 posts)
11. We don't have that in Pennsylvania either except
Fri Nov 25, 2022, 07:03 AM
Nov 2022

for being able to propose constitutional amendments. Any proposed amendment has to pass in two consecutive sessions of the state legislature. The Rs figured out the timing so their amendments would be on the ballot during primaries when their voters tend to turnout more regularly therefore having a much better chance to pass. They were set to cause more mischief but didn't foresee losing control of the state house.

keep_left

(1,780 posts)
13. Yep. That began in the early '90s with the Clinton victory. The right made it clear...
Fri Nov 25, 2022, 11:13 AM
Nov 2022

...that Clinton would be treated as illegitimate from the first day. They cranked up the entire outrage machine, from the "think" tanks to the newly-minted Fox News, and went on the attack for Clinton's entire term. The attitude clearly was that only they could rule, period.

Hermit-The-Prog

(33,259 posts)
16. They never forgave her for that ...
Fri Nov 25, 2022, 06:00 PM
Nov 2022

She started out by exposing racism in education, then threatened some big (insurance) revenue streams.

roamer65

(36,744 posts)
12. They hate that blue state to the north.
Fri Nov 25, 2022, 10:35 AM
Nov 2022

Recreational MJ, independent redistricting, legal abortion, etc.

All of it was done via ballot proposals.

They don’t want true democracy to spread there from here.

Go Blue!

mn9driver

(4,419 posts)
17. When right wingers are defeated at the ballot box, they don't abandon their proposals,
Fri Nov 25, 2022, 06:08 PM
Nov 2022

They abandon democracy.

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